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MedGen for PubMed (Select 16709486)

Items: 7

1.

Progressive hyperpigmentation

MedGen UID:
506083
Concept ID:
CN006582
Finding
2.

Hyperpigmentation, familial progressive, 1

Familial progressive hyperpigmentation (FPH) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by patches of hyperpigmentation in the skin, which are present at birth or in early infancy and increase in size and number with age (summary by Zhang et al., 2006). Also see familial progressive hyperpigmentation with or without hypopigmentation (FPHH; 145250). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
473598
Concept ID:
C2681535
Gene or Genome
3.

Familial progressive hyperpigmentation with or without hypopigmentation

Familial progressive hyperpigmentation with or without hypopigmentation (FPHH) is characterized by diffuse hyperpigmentation of variable intensity sometimes associated with cafe-au-lait macules and larger hypopigmented ash-leaf macules. These features, which involve the face, neck, trunk, and limbs, are seen at birth or develop early in infancy (summary by Wang et al., 2009 and Amyere et al., 2011). Also see familial progressive hyperpigmentation (FPH1; 614233). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
333550
Concept ID:
C1840392
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal-dominant condition characterized by the association of gastrointestinal polyposis, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and cancer predisposition. Peutz-Jeghers-type hamartomatous polyps are most common in the small intestine (in order of prevalence: in the jejunum, ileum, and duodenum) but can also occur in the stomach, large bowel, and extraintestinal sites including the renal pelvis, bronchus, gall bladder, nasal passages, urinary bladder, and ureters. Gastrointestinal polyps can result in chronic bleeding and anemia and also cause recurrent obstruction and intussusception requiring repeated laparotomy and bowel resection. Mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation presents in childhood as dark blue to dark brown macules around the mouth, eyes, and nostrils, in the perianal area, and on the buccal mucosa. Hyperpigmented macules on the fingers are common. The macules may fade in puberty and adulthood. Individuals with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome are at increased risk for a wide variety of epithelial malignancies (colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, breast, and ovarian cancers). Females are at risk for sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTAT), a benign neoplasm of the ovaries, and adenoma malignum of the cervix, a rare aggressive cancer. Males occasionally develop large calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCST) of the testes, which secrete estrogen and can lead to gynecomastia, advanced skeletal age, and ultimately short stature, if untreated. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18404
Concept ID:
C0031269
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Infancy

From 4 weeks to 23 months of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832100
Concept ID:
CN227393
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Multiple fibrofolliculomas

The clinical characteristics of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS) include cutaneous manifestations (fibrofolliculomas, trichodiscomas/angiofibromas, perifollicular fibromas, and acrochordons), pulmonary cysts/history of pneumothorax, and various types of renal tumors. Disease severity can vary significantly even within the same family. Skin lesions typically appear during the third and fourth decades of life and typically increase in size and number with age. Lung cysts are mostly bilateral and multifocal; most individuals are asymptomatic but at high risk for spontaneous pneumothorax. Individuals with BHDS are at a sevenfold increased risk for renal tumors that are typically bilateral and multifocal and usually slow growing; median age of tumor diagnosis is 48 years. The most common renal tumors are a hybrid of oncocytoma and chromophobe histologic cell types (so-called oncocytic hybrid tumor) and chromophobe histologic cell types. Some families have renal tumor and/or autosomal dominant spontaneous pneumothorax without cutaneous manifestations. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
91070
Concept ID:
C0346010
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hypermelanotic macule

A hyperpigmented circumscribed area of change in normal skin color without elevation or depression of any size. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
500898
Concept ID:
CN000969
Finding
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