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Results: 11

1.

Pain

Pain is a feeling triggered in the nervous system. Pain may be sharp or dull. It may come and go, or it may be constant. You may feel pain in one area of your body, such as your back, abdomen or chest or you may feel pain all over, such as when your muscles ache from the flu. Pain can be helpful in diagnosing a problem. Without pain, you might seriously hurt yourself without knowing it, or you might not realize you have a medical problem that needs treatment. Once you take care of the problem, pain usually goes away. However, sometimes pain goes on for weeks, months or even years. This is called chronic pain. Sometimes chronic pain is due to an ongoing cause, such as cancer or arthritis. Sometimes the cause is unknown. Fortunately, there are many ways to treat pain. Treatment varies depending on the cause of pain. Pain relievers, acupuncture and sometimes surgery are helpful.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45282
Concept ID:
C0030193
Sign or Symptom
2.

Abdominal pain

Your abdomen extends from below your chest to your groin. Some people call it the stomach, but your abdomen contains many other important organs. Pain in the abdomen can come from any one of them. The pain may start somewhere else, such as your chest. Severe pain doesn't always mean a serious problem. Nor does mild pain mean a problem is not serious. . Call your healthcare provider if mild pain lasts a week or more or if you have pain with other symptoms. Get medical help immediately if. - You have abdominal pain that is sudden and sharp. -You also have pain in your chest, neck or shoulder . - You're vomiting blood or have blood in your stool . - Your abdomen is stiff, hard and tender to touch . -You can't move your bowels, especially if you're also vomiting .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7803
Concept ID:
C0000737
Sign or Symptom
3.

Pain

MedGen UID:
776584
Concept ID:
C2364139
Finding
4.

Abdominal pain

An unpleasant sensation characterized by physical discomfort (such as pricking, throbbing, or aching) and perceived to originate in the abdomen. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505060
Concept ID:
CN001834
Finding
5.

Recurrent abdominal pain

MedGen UID:
432287
Concept ID:
C2585575
Sign or Symptom
6.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Novo-Mexiletine

MedGen UID:
288828
Concept ID:
C1563865
Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Mexiletene

MedGen UID:
182747
Concept ID:
C0949360
Pharmacologic Substance
9.

Mexitil

MedGen UID:
109375
Concept ID:
C0600129
Pharmacologic Substance
10.

KO-1173

MedGen UID:
5979
Concept ID:
C0022760
Pharmacologic Substance
11.

Lipomatosis dolorosa

Adiposis dolorosa, also known as Dercum disease, is characterized by generalized obesity and pronounced, disabling, and chronic pain in the adipose tissue of the proximal extremities, trunk, pelvic area, and buttocks; the face and hands are usually spared. There are a number of associated symptoms, including multiple lipomas, generalized weakness, fatigue, sleep disturbances, constipation, and psychiatric abnormalities. It is 5 to 30 times more common in women than men, and usually presents between 35 and 50 years of age (summary by Campen et al., 2001; review by Hansson et al., 2012). Based on a review of the literature and studies of 111 patients, Hansson et al, (2012) proposed a classification of Dercum disease into 4 types: (I) generalized diffuse form without clear lipomas, (II) generalized nodular form with multiple lipomas, (III) localized nodular form, and (IV) juxtaarticular form with solitary fatty deposits near joints. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
1757
Concept ID:
C0001529
Disease or Syndrome

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