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Results: 1 to 20 of 21

1.

Proportionate short stature; mild intellectual disability; dysmorphic facial features; precocious puberty

MedGen UID:
850705
Concept ID:
CN231399
Finding
2.

Hypothyroidism

MedGen UID:
413085
Concept ID:
C2750951
Finding
3.

Neonatal hemochromatosis

Neonatal hemochromatosis (NH) is characterized by hepatic failure in the newborn period and heavy iron staining in the liver. In addition, there is marked siderosis of extrahepatic tissues, including the heart and pancreas (Driscoll et al., 1988). Whitington (2007) postulated that some cases of neonatal hemochromatosis result from maternal alloimmunity directed at the fetal liver, and therefore do not represent an inherited mendelian disorder. Other causes may result from metabolic disease or perinatal infection. In particular, he commented that the disorder is not related to the family of inherited liver diseases that fall under the classification of hereditary hemochromatosis (see, e.g., 235200). Whitington (2007) proposed the term 'congenital alloimmune hepatitis.' In the past, the disorder has loosely been labeled 'neonatal hepatitis' and 'giant cell hepatitis,' which are pathologic findings in the liver representing a common response to a variety of insults, including cholestatic disorders and infection, among others (Fawaz et al., 1975; Knisely et al., 1987; Kelly et al., 2001). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82768
Concept ID:
C0268059
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Congenital hypothyroidism

Congenital hypothyroidism is a condition that affects infants from birth (congenital) and results from a partial or complete loss of thyroid function (hypothyroidism). The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped tissue in the lower neck. It makes iodine-containing hormones that play an important role in regulating growth, brain development, and the rate of chemical reactions in the body (metabolism). Congenital hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland fails to develop or function properly. In 80 to 85 percent of cases, the thyroid gland is absent, abnormally located, or severely reduced in size (hypoplastic). In the remaining cases, a normal-sized or enlarged thyroid gland is present, but production of thyroid hormones is decreased or absent. If untreated, congenital hypothyroidism can lead to intellectual disability and abnormal growth. In the United States and many other countries, all newborns are tested for congenital hypothyroidism. If treatment begins in the first month after birth, infants usually develop normally.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
41344
Concept ID:
C0010308
Congenital Abnormality
5.

Increased body weight

A change in overall body weight, relative to the beginning of the collection period. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
12145
Concept ID:
C0043094
Finding
6.

Neonatal

From delivery to 4 weeks of life. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
832381
Concept ID:
CN227392
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Goiter

An enlargement of the thyroid gland. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504628
Concept ID:
CN000799
Finding
8.

Congenital hypothyroidism

A type of hypothyroidism with congenital onset. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504626
Concept ID:
CN000797
Finding
9.

Hypothyroidism, congenital, nongoitrous, 1

Resistance to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; see 188540), a hallmark of congenital nongoitrous hypothyroidism, causes increased levels of plasma TSH and low levels of thyroid hormone. Only a subset of patients develop frank hypothyroidism; the remainder are euthyroid and asymptomatic (so-called compensated hypothyroidism) and are usually detected by neonatal screening programs (Paschke and Ludgate, 1997). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Nongoitrous Hypothyroidism CHNG2 (218700) is caused by mutation in the PAX8 gene (167415) on chromosome 2q12-q14; CHNG3 (609893) maps to a locus on chromosome 15q25.3; CHNG4 (275100) is caused by mutation in the TSHB gene (188540) on chromosome 1p13; CHNG5 (225250) is caused by mutation in the NKX2-5 gene (600584) on chromosome 5q34; and CHNG6 (614450) is caused by mutation in the THRA gene (190120) on chromosome 17q21.1. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
487729
Concept ID:
C3493776
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Dwarfism

A dwarf is a person of short stature - under 4' 10 as an adult. More than 200 different conditions can cause dwarfism. A single type, called achondroplasia, causes about 70 percent of all dwarfism. Achondroplasia is a genetic condition that affects about 1 in 15,000 to 1 in 40,000 people. It makes your arms and legs short in comparison to your head and trunk. Other genetic conditions, kidney disease and problems with metabolism or hormones can also cause short stature. Dwarfism itself is not a disease. However, there is a greater risk of some health problems. With proper medical care, most people with dwarfism have active lives and live as long as other people.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3931
Concept ID:
C0013336
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Abnormality of thyroid physiology

MedGen UID:
808233
Concept ID:
C0857576
Finding
14.

Abnormality of body weight

MedGen UID:
488951
Concept ID:
C0878621
Finding
15.

Abnormality of glutamine metabolism

An abnormality of a glutamine metabolic process. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
451198
Concept ID:
CN116636
Finding
16.

Abnormality of femoral epiphysis

An anomaly of a growth plate of a femur. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
446760
Concept ID:
CN005659
Finding
17.

Abnormality of serum amino acid levels

The presence of an abnormal decrease or increase of one or more amino acids in the blood circulation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
446472
Concept ID:
CN002806
Finding
18.

Abnormality of glycoprotein metabolism

An abnormality of a glycoprotein metabolic process. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
428078
Concept ID:
CN003866
Finding
19.

Abnormality of the distal femoral epiphysis

Any abnormality of the distal epiphysis of the femur. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
426740
Concept ID:
CN009416
Finding
20.

Thyroid dyshormonogenesis 6

Congenital hypothyroidism is a condition that affects infants from birth (congenital) and results from a partial or complete loss of thyroid function (hypothyroidism). The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped tissue in the lower neck. It makes iodine-containing hormones that play an important role in regulating growth, brain development, and the rate of chemical reactions in the body (metabolism). Congenital hypothyroidism occurs when the thyroid gland fails to develop or function properly. In 80 to 85 percent of cases, the thyroid gland is absent, abnormally located, or severely reduced in size (hypoplastic). In the remaining cases, a normal-sized or enlarged thyroid gland is present, but production of thyroid hormones is decreased or absent. If untreated, congenital hypothyroidism can lead to intellectual disability and abnormal growth. In the United States and many other countries, all newborns are tested for congenital hypothyroidism. If treatment begins in the first month after birth, infants usually develop normally.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
375935
Concept ID:
C1846632
Disease or Syndrome

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