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Items: 19

1.

Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease

Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) is a form of bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia that is often associated with adrenocorticotrophin hormone (ACTH) independent Cushing syndrome (see this term) and is characterized by small to normal sized adrenal glands containing multiple small cortical pigmented nodules (less than 1 cm in diameter). [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
799719
Concept ID:
CN200645
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Carney complex

Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by skin pigmentary abnormalities, myxomas, endocrine tumors or overactivity, and schwannomas. Pale brown to black lentigines are the most common presenting feature of CNC and typically increase in number at puberty. Cardiac myxomas occur at a young age, may occur in any or all cardiac chambers, and manifest as intracardiac obstruction of blood flow, embolic phenomena, and/or heart failure. Other sites for myxomas include the skin, breast, oropharynx, and female genital tract. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which causes Cushing syndrome, is the most frequently observed endocrine tumor in CNC, occurring in approximately 25% of affected individuals. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCTs) are observed in one third of affected males within the first decade and in almost all adult males. Up to 75% of individuals with CNC have multiple thyroid nodules, most of which are thyroid follicular adenomas. Clinically evident acromegaly from a growth hormone (GH)-producing adenoma is evident in approximately 10% of adults. Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS), a rare tumor of the nerve sheath, occurs in an estimated 10% of affected individuals. The median age of diagnosis is 20 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140810
Concept ID:
C0406810
Disease or Syndrome
3.

ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome

Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) independent Cushing syndrome is a form of endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS; see this term) that may result from excess secretion of cortisol by either a unilateral and benign (adrenocortical adenoma: 55-60%) or malignant (adrenocortical carcinoma: 35-40 %) adrenocortical tumor or by bilateral adrenal secretion by macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH), as an isolated disease or as part of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS), or by primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), as an isolated disease or as part of Carney complex (CNC; see these terms). [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798745
Concept ID:
CN207429
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cushing syndrome

Cushing's syndrome (CS) encompasses a group of hormonal disorders caused by prolonged and high exposure levels to glucocorticoids that can be of either endogenous (adrenal cortex production) or exogenous (iatrogenic) origin. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
797996
Concept ID:
CN205287
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hypercortisolism

Overproduction of the hormone of cortisol by the adrenal cortex, resulting in a characteristic combination of clinical symptoms termed Cushing syndrome, with truncal obesity, a round, full face, striae atrophicae and acne, muscle weakness, and other features. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427887
Concept ID:
CN001437
Finding
6.

Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 1

Primary pigmented micronodular adrenocortical disease is a form of ACTH-independent adrenal hyperplasia resulting in Cushing syndrome. It is usually seen as a manifestation of the Carney complex (CNC1; 160980), a multiple neoplasia syndrome. However, PPNAD can also occur in isolation (Groussin et al., 2002). Genetic Heterogeneity of Primary Pigmented Micronodular Adrenocortical Disease See also PPNAD2 (610475), caused by mutation in the PDE11A gene (604961) on chromosome 2q31; PPNAD3 (614190), caused by mutation in the PDE8B gene (603390) on chromosome 5q13; and PPNAD4 (615830), caused by a duplication on chromosome 19p13 that includes the PRKACA gene (601639). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
400627
Concept ID:
C1864846
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect

MedGen UID:
396060
Concept ID:
C1861101
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Atrial myxoma, familial

MedGen UID:
376844
Concept ID:
C1850635
Disease or Syndrome; Neoplastic Process
9.

Cushing syndrome

ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is an endogenous form of adrenal Cushing syndrome characterized by multiple bilateral adrenocortical nodules that cause a striking enlargement of the adrenal glands. Although some familial cases have been reported, the vast majority of AIMAH cases are sporadic. Patients typically present in the fifth and sixth decades of life, approximately 10 years later than most patients with other causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). Approximately 10 to 15% of adrenal Cushing syndrome is due to primary bilateral ACTH-independent adrenocortical pathology. The 2 main subtypes are AIMAH and primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD, see 610489), which is often a component of the Carney complex (160980) and associated with mutations in the PRKAR1A gene (188830) on chromosome 17q23-q24. AIMAH is rare, representing less than 1% of endogenous causes of Cushing syndrome (Swain et al., 1998; Christopoulos et al., 2005). See also ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (615830) due to somatic mutation in the PRKACA gene (601639). Cushing 'disease' (219090) is an ACTH-dependent disorder caused in most cases by pituitary adenomas that secrete excessive ACTH. Genetic Heterogeneity of ACTH-Independent Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia AIMAH2 (615954) is caused by germline mutation of 1 allele of the ARMC5 gene (615549) coupled with a somatic mutation in the other allele. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
347456
Concept ID:
C1857451
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Autosomal dominant inheritance

Autosomal dominant inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur when a mutation is present in one copy of a given gene (i.e., the person is heterozygous). [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141047
Concept ID:
C0443147
Genetic Function; Intellectual Product
11.

Hypercortisolism

Abnormally high level of cortisol in the blood.(NICHD) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
7899
Concept ID:
C0001622
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Disorder of endocrine system

Your endocrine system includes eight major glands throughout your body. These glands make hormones. Hormones are chemical messengers. They travel through your bloodstream to tissues or organs. Hormones work slowly and affect body processes from head to toe. These include. -Growth and development. -Metabolism - digestion, elimination, breathing, blood circulation and maintaining body temperature . -Sexual function. -Reproduction. -Mood. If your hormone levels are too high or too low, you may have a hormone disorder. Hormone diseases also occur if your body does not respond to hormones the way it is supposed to. Stress, infection and changes in your blood's fluid and electrolyte balance can also influence hormone levels. In the United States, the most common endocrine disease is diabetes. There are many others. They are usually treated by controlling how much hormone your body makes. Hormone supplements can help if the problem is too little of a hormone.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4043
Concept ID:
C0014130
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Disorder of adrenal gland

The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live without, including sex hormones and cortisol. Cortisol helps you respond to stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not enough hormones. In Cushing's syndrome, there's too much cortisol, while with Addison's disease, there is too little. Some people are born unable to make enough cortisol. Causes of adrenal gland disorders include. -Genetic mutations. -Tumors including pheochromocytomas. -Infections. -A problem in another gland, such as the pituitary, which helps to regulate the adrenal gland. -Certain medicines. Treatment depends on which problem you have. Surgery or medicines can treat many adrenal gland disorders. NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
155
Concept ID:
C0001621
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Carney complex, type 2

Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by skin pigmentary abnormalities, myxomas, endocrine tumors or overactivity, and schwannomas. Pale brown to black lentigines are the most common presenting feature of CNC and typically increase in number at puberty. Cardiac myxomas occur at a young age, may occur in any or all cardiac chambers, and manifest as intracardiac obstruction of blood flow, embolic phenomena, and/or heart failure. Other sites for myxomas include the skin, breast, oropharynx, and female genital tract. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which causes Cushing syndrome, is the most frequently observed endocrine tumor in CNC, occurring in approximately 25% of affected individuals. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCTs) are observed in one third of affected males within the first decade and in almost all adult males. Up to 75% of individuals with CNC have multiple thyroid nodules, most of which are thyroid follicular adenomas. Clinically evident acromegaly from a growth hormone (GH)-producing adenoma is evident in approximately 10% of adults. Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS), a rare tumor of the nerve sheath, occurs in an estimated 10% of affected individuals. The median age of diagnosis is 20 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
340253
Concept ID:
C1854540
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 4

Cushing syndrome is a clinical designation for the systemic signs and symptoms arising from excess cortisol production. Affected individuals typically show hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance, central obesity, osteoporosis, and sometimes depression. Corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome results from autonomous cortisol production by the adrenal glands, often associated with adrenocortical tumors. Adrenocortical tumors are most common in adult females (summary by Cao et al., 2014; Sato et al., 2014). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
786093
Concept ID:
CN188261
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease, primary, 3

MedGen UID:
481724
Concept ID:
C3280094
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Cushing syndrome, familial

MedGen UID:
447729
Concept ID:
CN036793
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Carney complex variant

MedGen UID:
332400
Concept ID:
C1837245
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Russell-silver syndrome, X-linked

MedGen UID:
67401
Concept ID:
C0220775
Disease or Syndrome
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