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Results: 14

1.

Papilloma

A benign epithelial neoplasm that projects above the surrounding epithelial surface. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10566
Concept ID:
C0030354
Neoplastic Process
2.

Papilloma of skin

A benign papillary neoplasm of the skin. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
91127
Concept ID:
C0347390
Neoplastic Process
3.

Carcinogenesis

The origin, production or development of cancer through genotypic and phenotypic changes which upset the normal balance between cell proliferation and cell death. Carcinogenesis generally requires a constellation of steps, which may occur quickly or over a period of many years. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
154544
Concept ID:
C0596263
Neoplastic Process
4.

Skin Carcinogenesis

The process by which normal skin cells are transformed into cancer cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
276822
Concept ID:
C1519346
Neoplastic Process
5.

Epithelial neoplasm

neoplasm of epithelial origin, ranging from benign (adenoma and papilloma) to malignant (carcinoma). [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
277963
Concept ID:
C1368683
Neoplastic Process
6.

Papillomatosis

MedGen UID:
64459
Concept ID:
C0205875
Neoplastic Process
7.

Squamous cell neoplasm

Neoplasms composed of squamous cells of the epithelium. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in tissue composed of squamous elements. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
60219
Concept ID:
C0206720
Neoplastic Process
8.

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
59786
Concept ID:
C0175166
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Disorder of skin

Did you know that your skin is the largest organ of your body? It is, in terms of both weight, between 6 and 9 pounds, and surface area, about 2 square yards. Your skin separates the inside of your body from the outside world. It: -Protects you from bacteria and viruses that can cause infections. -Helps you sense the outside world, such as whether it is hot or cold, wet or dry. -Regulates your body temperature . Conditions that irritate, clog or inflame your skin can cause symptoms such as redness, swelling, burning and itching. Allergies, irritants, your genetic makeup and certain diseases and immune system problems can cause dermatitis, hives and other skin conditions. Many skin problems, such as acne, also affect your appearance.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20777
Concept ID:
C0037274
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Neoplasm of skin

A benign or malignant tumor involving the skin. Representative examples of benign skin neoplasms include the benign melanocytic skin nevus, acanthoma, sebaceous adenoma, sweat gland adenoma, lipoma, hemangioma, fibroma, and benign fibrous histiocytoma. Representative examples of malignant skin neoplasms include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, and Kaposi sarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
19993
Concept ID:
C0037286
Neoplastic Process
11.

Neoplasms by Histologic Type

A collective term for the various histological types of NEOPLASMS. It is more likely to be used by searchers than by indexers and catalogers. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10295
Concept ID:
C0027652
Neoplastic Process
12.

Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial

Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10217
Concept ID:
C0027660
Neoplastic Process
13.

Papilloma of the Mouse Skin

MedGen UID:
282643
Concept ID:
C1522106
Neoplastic Process
14.

Squamous cell papilloma of skin

MedGen UID:
83397
Concept ID:
C0345983
Neoplastic Process

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