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Results: 1 to 20 of 23

1.

Dopamine

A monoamine compound with positive inotropic activity. Dopamine is a naturally occurring catecholamine formed by decarboxylation of dehydroxyphenylalanine and a precursor of norepinephrine and epinephrine. Dopamine binds to alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptors. Mediated through myocardial beta-1 adrenergic receptors, dopamine increase heart rate and force, thereby increasing cardiac output. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor stimulation on vascular smooth muscle, leads to vasoconstriction and results in an increase in systemic vascular resistance. Stimulation of dopaminergic receptors in renal vasculature, leads to renal blood vessel dilation, and an increase in glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, sodium excretion, and urine output. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
41644
Concept ID:
C0013030
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

MedGen UID:
426927
Concept ID:
CN033424
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Disease Response

The pathologic and/or clinical changes that result from treatment. The changes may include eradication of detectable disease, stabilization of disease, or disease progression. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
309976
Concept ID:
C1704632
Finding
4.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Is it hard for your child to sit still? Does your child act without thinking first? Does your child start but not finish things? If so, your child may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Nearly everyone shows some of these behaviors at times, but ADHD lasts more than 6 months and causes problems in school, at home and in social situations. ADHD is more common in boys than girls. It affects 3-5 percent of all American children. The main features of ADHD are: -Inattention. -Hyperactivity. -Impulsivity. No one knows exactly what causes ADHD. It sometimes runs in families, so genetics may be a factor. There may also be environmental factors. A complete evaluation by a trained professional is the only way to know for sure if your child has ADHD. Treatment may include medicine to control symptoms, therapy, or both. Structure at home and at school is important. Parent training may also help. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
220387
Concept ID:
C1263846
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Inhibition

MedGen UID:
5809
Concept ID:
C0021469
Molecular Function
6.

Elderly person

A person 65 through 79 years of age. For a person older than 79 years, AGED, 80 AND OVER is available. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7927
Concept ID:
C0001792
Finding
7.

Independent

MedGen UID:
721426
Concept ID:
C1299583
Finding
8.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) manifests at age 2-3 years or by first grade at the latest. The main symptoms are distractibility, impulsivity, hyperactivity, and often trouble organizing tasks and projects, difficulty going to sleep, and social problems from being aggressive, loud, or impatient. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506017
Concept ID:
CN006126
Finding
9.

Hyperactivity

MedGen UID:
504585
Concept ID:
CN000708
Finding
10.

Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy

Familial hyperinsulinism (referred to as FHI in this GeneReview) is characterized by hypoglycemia that ranges from severe neonatal-onset, difficult-to-manage disease to childhood-onset disease with mild symptoms and difficult-to-diagnose hypoglycemia. Neonatal-onset disease manifests within hours to two days after birth. Childhood-onset disease manifests during the first months or years of life. In the newborn period, presenting symptoms may be nonspecific, including seizures, hypotonia, poor feeding, and apnea. In severe cases, serum glucose concentrations are typically extremely low and thus easily recognized, whereas in milder cases, variable and mild hypoglycemia may make the diagnosis more difficult. Even within the same family, disease manifestations can range from mild to severe. Individuals with autosomal recessive familial hyperinsulinism, caused by mutations in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11 (FHI-KATP), tend to be large for gestational age and usually present with severe refractory hypoglycemia in the first 48 hours of life; affected infants usually respond only partially to diet or medical management (i.e., diazoxide therapy) and thus may require pancreatic resection. Individuals with autosomal dominant FHI-KATP tend to be appropriate for gestational age at birth, to present at approximately age one year (range: 2 days - 30 years), and to respond to diet and diazoxide therapy. Exceptions to both of these generalities have been reported. FHI-GCK, caused by mutations in GCK, may be much milder than FHI-KATP; however, some persons have severe, diazoxide-unresponsive hypoglycemia. FHI-HADH, caused by mutations in HADH, tends to be relatively mild, although severe cases have been reported. Individuals with FHI-HNF4A, caused by mutations in HNF4A, are typically born large for gestational age and have mild features that respond to diazoxide treatment. FHI-UCP2, caused by mutations in UCP2, is a rare cause of diazoxide-responsive FH1. Hyperammonemia/hyperinsulinism (HA/HI) is associated with mild-to-moderate hyperammonemia and with relatively mild, late-onset hypoglycemia; most but not all affected individuals have mutations in GLUD1. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
226230
Concept ID:
C1257959
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Disease regression

Return to a former state; a subsidence of the symptoms of a disease process; in cancer, a decrease in the size of a tumor or in the extent of cancer in the body. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
195771
Concept ID:
C0684320
Pathologic Function
12.

Impairment

Loss or abnormality of psychological, physiological, or anatomic structure or function. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
151925
Concept ID:
C0684336
Pathologic Function
13.

Hyperactive behavior

Excessive movement of muscles of the body as a whole, which may be associated with organic or psychological disorders. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
98406
Concept ID:
C0424295
Finding
14.

Diagnosis, Psychiatric

MedGen UID:
138165
Concept ID:
C0376338
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
15.

Mental Disorders Diagnosed in Childhood

Those psychiatric disorders usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence. These disorders can also be first diagnosed during other life stages. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
101230
Concept ID:
C0525040
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
16.

Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders

MedGen UID:
68635
Concept ID:
C0236964
Pathologic Function
17.

Mental disorder

Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including: -Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias. -Bipolar disorder. -Depression. -Mood disorders. -Personality disorders. -Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia. There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a role. Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, may also matter. Biological factors can also be part of the cause. A traumatic brain injury can lead to a mental disorder. A mother's exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant may play a part. Other factors may increase your risk, such as use of illegal drugs or having a serious medical condition like cancer. Medications and counseling can help many mental disorders. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14047
Concept ID:
C0004936
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
18.

Heredity

The transmission of traits encoded in GENES from parent to offspring. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
6814
Concept ID:
C0019266
Molecular Function
19.

MEMORY QUANTITATIVE TRAIT LOCUS

MedGen UID:
816419
Concept ID:
C3810089
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Memory quantitative trait locus

MedGen UID:
776396
Concept ID:
CN183729
Disease or Syndrome

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