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Results: 1 to 20 of 38

1.

Prader-Willi syndrome

Prader-Willi (PWS) syndrome is characterized by severe hypotonia and feeding difficulties in early infancy, followed in later infancy or early childhood by excessive eating and gradual development of morbid obesity (unless eating is externally controlled). Motor milestones and language development are delayed. All individuals have some degree of cognitive impairment. A distinctive behavioral phenotype (with temper tantrums, stubbornness, manipulative behavior, and obsessive-compulsive characteristics) is common. Hypogonadism is present in both males and females and manifests as genital hypoplasia, incomplete pubertal development, and, in most, infertility. Short stature is common; characteristic facial features, strabismus, and scoliosis are often present, and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus often occurs in obese individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
46057
Concept ID:
C0032897
Congenital Abnormality
2.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
488662

3.

Learning Disabilities

According to U.S. federal legislation, disabilities involved in understanding or using language, manifested in impaired listening, thinking, talking, reading, writing, or arithmetic skills. Includes perceptual handicaps, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, and developmental aphasia. Compare LEARNING DISORDERS. [from PSY]

MedGen UID:
199623
Concept ID:
C0751265
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Bardet-Biedl syndrome

Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
156019
Concept ID:
C0752166
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hypogonadism

Condition resulting from deficient gonadal functions, such as GAMETOGENESIS and the production of GONADAL STEROID HORMONES. It is characterized by delay in GROWTH, germ cell maturation, and development of secondary sex characteristics. Hypogonadism can be due to a deficiency of GONADOTROPINS (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) or due to primary gonadal failure (hypergonadotropic hypogonadism). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5711
Concept ID:
C0020619
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Muscle fasciculation

Involuntary contraction of the muscle fibers innervated by a motor unit. Fasciculations can often by visualized and take the form of a muscle twitch or dimpling under the skin, but usually do not generate sufficient force to move a limb. They may represent a benign condition or occur as a manifestation of MOTOR NEURON DISEASE or PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1294) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5124
Concept ID:
C0015644
Sign or Symptom
9.

learning disabilities

MedGen UID:
833579
Concept ID:
CN229495
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Fasciculations

Fasciculations are observed as small, local, involuntary muscle contractions (twitching) visible under the skin. Fasciculations result from increased irritability of an axon (which in turn is often a manifestation of disease of a motor neuron). This leads to sporadic discharges of all the muscle fibers controlled by the axon in isolation from other motor units. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505219
Concept ID:
CN002161
Finding
11.

Hypogonadism

A decreased functionality of the gonad. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504359
Concept ID:
CN000131
Finding
12.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449670

13.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
14.

Bardet-Biedl syndrome 10

Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is characterized by rod-cone dystrophy, truncal obesity, postaxial polydactyly, cognitive impairment, male hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, complex female genitourinary malformations, and renal abnormalities. The visual prognosis for children with BBS is poor. Night blindness is usually evident by age seven to eight years; the mean age of legal blindness is 15.5 years. Birth weight is usually normal, but significant weight gain begins within the first year and becomes a lifelong issue for most individuals. A majority of individuals have significant learning difficulties; a minority have severe impairment on IQ testing. Renal disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
347909
Concept ID:
C1859568
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Microcephaly, normal intelligence and immunodeficiency

Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is characterized by progressive microcephaly, intrauterine growth retardation and short stature, recurrent sinopulmonary infections, an increased risk for cancer, and premature ovarian failure in females. Developmental milestones are attained at the usual time during the first year; however, borderline delays in development and hyperactivity may be observed in early childhood. Intellectual abilities tend to decline over time and most children tested after age seven years have mild to moderate intellectual disability. Recurrent pneumonia and bronchitis may result in respiratory failure and early death. Approximately 40% of affected individuals have developed malignancies before age 20 years, with the risk being highest for T-cell (55%) and B-cell lymphomas (45%). Other tumors include T-cell lymphoma and solid tumors (e.g., medulloblastoma, glioma, and rhabdomyosarcoma). Note, however, that much of what is reported about NBS is based on individuals who are homozygous for the single most common Eastern European pathogenic variant, 657_661del5. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140771
Concept ID:
C0398791
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Functional disorder

Deranged function in an individual or an organ that is due to a disease. (MedicineNet.com) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
124450
Concept ID:
C0277785
Pathologic Function
17.

Sporadic

MedGen UID:
64410
Concept ID:
C0205422
18.

Retinaldehyde

A carotenoid constituent of visual pigments. It is the oxidized form of retinol which functions as the active component of the visual cycle. It is bound to the protein opsin forming the complex rhodopsin. When stimulated by visible light, the retinal component of the rhodopsin complex undergoes isomerization at the 11-position of the double bond to the cis-form; this is reversed in "dark" reactions to return to the native trans-configuration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19764
Concept ID:
C0035331
Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Chromosome Deletion

actual loss of a portion of or the entire chromosome. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
3073
Concept ID:
C0008628
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
20.

Intellectual functioning disability

Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabiled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811461
Concept ID:
C3714756
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction

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