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1.

Pneumonia

Pneumonia is an infection in one or both of the lungs. Many germs, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi, can cause pneumonia. You can also get pneumonia by inhaling a liquid or chemical. People most at risk are older than 65 or younger than 2 years of age, or already have health problems. Symptoms of pneumonia vary from mild to severe. See your doctor promptly if you: -Have a high fever. -Have shaking chills. -Have a cough with phlegm that doesn't improve or gets worse. -Develop shortness of breath with normal daily activities. -Have chest pain when you breathe or cough. -Feel suddenly worse after a cold or the flu. Your doctor will use your medical history, a physical exam, and lab tests to diagnose pneumonia. Treatment depends on what kind you have. If bacteria are the cause, antibiotics should help. If you have viral pneumonia, your doctor may prescribe an antiviral medicine to treat it. Preventing pneumonia is always better than treating it. Vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and the flu. Other preventive measures include washing your hands frequently and not smoking. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10813
Concept ID:
C0032285
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Pneumonia

Inflammation of any part of the lung parenchyma. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505095
Concept ID:
CN001891
Finding
3.

Severe

A term used to describe cells that look abnormal under a microscope. These cells are more likely to grow and spread quickly than cells in low-grade cancer or in growths that may become cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
104640
Concept ID:
C0205082
4.

Onset

The start, beginning, or early stages. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87142
Concept ID:
C0332162
5.

Infection

Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
811352
Concept ID:
C3714514
Pathologic Function
6.

Soft tissue infection

Infections of non-skeletal tissue, i.e., exclusive of bone, ligaments, cartilage, and fibrous tissue. The concept is usually referred to as skin and soft tissue infections and usually subcutaneous and muscle tissue are involved. The predisposing factors in anaerobic infections are trauma, ischemia, and surgery. The organisms often derive from the fecal or oral flora, particularly in wounds associated with intestinal surgery, decubitus ulcer, and human bites. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1688) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
101768
Concept ID:
C0149778
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Infection

Unknown contamination with disease-producing germs. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
43874
Concept ID:
C0021311
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Furunculosis

A persistent skin infection marked by the presence of furuncles, often chronic and recurrent. In humans, the causative agent is various species of STAPHYLOCOCCUS. In salmonid fish (SALMONIDS), the pathogen is AEROMONAS SALMONICIDA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
42118
Concept ID:
C0016867
Disease or Syndrome
9.

SHORT STATURE, ONYCHODYSPLASIA, FACIAL DYSMORPHISM, AND HYPOTRICHOSIS SYNDROME

MedGen UID:
762199
Concept ID:
C3542022
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Absence

MedGen UID:
739164
Concept ID:
C1689985
Anatomical Abnormality
11.

Short stature, onychodysplasia, facial dysmorphism, and hypotrichosis

SOFT syndrome is characterized by severely short long bones, peculiar facies associated with paucity of hair, and nail anomalies. Growth retardation is evident on prenatal ultrasound as early as the second trimester of pregnancy, and affected individuals reach a final stature consistent with a height age of 6 years to 8 years. Relative macrocephaly is present during early childhood but head circumference is markedly low by adulthood. Psychomotor development is normal. Facial dysmorphism includes a long, triangular face with prominent nose and small ears, and affected individuals have an unusual high-pitched voice. Clinodactyly, brachydactyly, and hypoplastic distal phalanges and fingernails are present in association with postpubertal sparse and short hair. Typical skeletal findings include short and thick long bones with mild irregular metaphyseal changes, short femoral necks, and hypoplastic pelvis and sacrum. All long bones of the hand are short, with major delay of carpal ossification and cone-shaped epiphyses. Vertebral body ossification is also delayed (summary by Sarig et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
472512
Concept ID:
CN143712
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Severity

The degree of something undesirable e.g. pain or weather; also, strictness. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141003
Concept ID:
C0439793
13.

Problem

A difficulty, disorder, or condition needing resolution. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
46106
Concept ID:
C0033213
Finding
14.

Influenza

Flu is a respiratory infection caused by a number of viruses. The viruses pass through the air and enter your body through your nose or mouth. Between 5% and 20% of people in the U.S. get the flu each year. The flu can be serious or even deadly for elderly people, newborn babies, and people with certain chronic illnesses. Symptoms of the flu come on suddenly and are worse than those of the common cold. They may include: -Body or muscle aches. -Chills . -Cough . -Fever . -Headache . -Sore throat . Is it a cold or the flu? Colds rarely cause a fever or headaches. Flu almost never causes an upset stomach. And stomach flu isn't really flu at all, but gastroenteritis. Most people with the flu recover on their own without medical care. People with mild cases of the flu should stay home and avoid contact with others, except to get medical care. If you get the flu, your health care provider may prescribe medicine to help your body fight the infection and lessen symptoms. . The main way to keep from getting the flu is to get a yearly flu vaccine. Good hygiene, including hand washing, can also help. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9466
Concept ID:
C0021400
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Community-Acquired Infections

Any infection acquired in the community, that is, contrasted with those acquired in a health care facility (CROSS INFECTION). An infection would be classified as community-acquired if the patient had not recently been in a health care facility or been in contact with someone who had been recently in a health care facility. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
64530
Concept ID:
C0206171
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Staphylococcal infectious disease

Staph is short for Staphylococcus, a type of bacteria. There are over 30 types, but Staphylococcus aureus causes most staph infections (pronounced staff infections), including: -Skin infections. -Pneumonia. -Food poisoning. -Toxic shock syndrome. -Blood poisoning (bacteremia). Skin infections are the most common. They can look like pimples or boils. They may be red, swollen and painful, and sometimes have pus or other drainage. They can turn into impetigo, which turns into a crust on the skin, or cellulitis, a swollen, red area of skin that feels hot. Anyone can get a staph skin infection. You are more likely to get one if you have a cut or scratch, or have contact with a person or surface that has staph bacteria. The best way to prevent staph is to keep hands and wounds clean. Most staph skin infections are easily treated with antibiotics or by draining the infection. Some staph bacteria such as MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) are resistant to certain antibiotics, making infections harder to treat.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
52483
Concept ID:
C0038160
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Gram-Positive Bacterial Infections

Infections caused by bacteria that retain the crystal violet stain (positive) when treated by the gram-staining method. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
39283
Concept ID:
C0085426
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Bacterial Infections

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won't hurt you - less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese. But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14012
Concept ID:
C0004623
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Bacterial Infections and Mycoses

Infections caused by bacteria and fungi, general, specified, or unspecified. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2161
Concept ID:
C0004615
Disease or Syndrome
20.

furuncle

hair follicle infection [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
66060
Concept ID:
C0242301
Disease or Syndrome

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