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Results: 15

1.

Retinal neovascularization

Formation of new blood vessels originating from the retinal veins and extending along the inner (vitreal) surface of the retina. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
20550
Concept ID:
C0035320
Pathologic Function
2.

Proliferation

Growth and reproduction of new similar forms, e.g. cells, buds, or offspring. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
137720
Concept ID:
C0334094
Pathologic Function
3.

Neovascularization

A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45041
Concept ID:
C0027686
Pathologic Function
4.

Falls

A fall can change your life. If you're elderly, it can lead to disability and a loss of independence. If your bones are fragile from osteoporosis, you could break a bone, often a hip. But aging alone doesn't make people fall. Diabetes and heart disease affect balance. So do problems with circulation, thyroid or nervous systems. Some medicines make people dizzy. Eye problems or alcohol can be factors. Any of these things can make a fall more likely. Babies and young children are also at risk of falling - off of furniture and down stairs, for example. Falls and accidents seldom just happen. Taking care of your health by exercising and getting regular eye exams and physicals may help reduce your chance of falling. Getting rid of tripping hazards in your home and wearing nonskid shoes may also help. To reduce the chances of breaking a bone if you do fall, make sure that you get enough calcium and vitamin D. . NIH: National Institute on Aging.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
39084
Concept ID:
C0085639
Finding
5.

Retinaldehyde

A carotenoid constituent of visual pigments. It is the oxidized form of retinol which functions as the active component of the visual cycle. It is bound to the protein opsin forming the complex rhodopsin. When stimulated by visible light, the retinal component of the rhodopsin complex undergoes isomerization at the 11-position of the double bond to the cis-form; this is reversed in "dark" reactions to return to the native trans-configuration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19764
Concept ID:
C0035331
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Sugar

A white crystalline carbohydrate, typically sucrose, used as a sweetener and preservative. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
69157
Concept ID:
C0242209
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

vessel (polysaccharide)

MedGen UID:
56099
Concept ID:
C0148346
Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Polysaccharide

A large carbohydrate molecule. It contains many small sugar molecules that are joined chemically. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
46014
Concept ID:
C0032594
Pharmacologic Substance
9.

Immunoglobulins

there are two types of polypeptide chains responsible for the biological and immunological properties of the different immunoglobulins, the heavy chain and the light chain; they are linked by covalent and non-covalent forces to give a four-chain Y-shaped structure based on pairs of identical heavy and light chains; each chain consists of a variable region and a constant region which are coded for by different genes; some immunoglobulin classes occur as polymers of this basic monomer. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
43841
Concept ID:
C0021027
Pharmacologic Substance
10.

Corneal neovascularization

New blood vessels originating from the corneal veins and extending from the limbus into the adjacent CORNEAL STROMA. Neovascularization in the superficial and/or deep corneal stroma is a sequel to numerous inflammatory diseases of the ocular anterior segment, such as TRACHOMA, viral interstitial KERATITIS, microbial KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS, and the immune response elicited by CORNEAL TRANSPLANTATION. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
43103
Concept ID:
C0085109
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Retinal Diseases

The retina is a layer of tissue in the back of your eye that senses light and sends images to your brain. In the center of this nerve tissue is the macula. It provides the sharp, central vision needed for reading, driving and seeing fine detail. Retinal disorders affect this vital tissue. They can affect your vision, and some can be serious enough to cause blindness. Examples are: -Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys your sharp, central vision. -Diabetic eye disease. -Retinal detachment - a medical emergency, when the retina is pulled away from the back of the eye. -Macular pucker - scar tissue on the macula. -Macular hole - a small break in the macula that usually happens to people over 60. -Floaters - cobwebs or specks in your field of vision. NIH: National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11209
Concept ID:
C0035309
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Metaplasia

A condition in which there is a change of one adult cell type to another similar adult cell type. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
7571
Concept ID:
C0025568
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
13.

Ischemia

a decrease in blood supply caused by blockage of blood vessel [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
5899
Concept ID:
C0022116
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of eye

Some eye problems are minor and don't last long. But some can lead to a permanent loss of vision. Common eye problems include: -Refractive errors. -Cataracts - clouded lenses. -Glaucoma - a disorder caused by damage to the optic nerve. -Retinal disorders - problems with the nerve layer at the back of the eye. -Macular degeneration - a disease that destroys sharp, central vision. -Diabetic eye problems. -Conjunctivitis - an infection also known as pinkeye. Your best defense is to have regular checkups, because eye diseases do not always have symptoms. Early detection and treatment could prevent vision loss. See an eye care professional right away if you have a sudden change in vision, if everything looks dim, or if you see flashes of light. Other symptoms that need quick attention are pain, double vision, fluid coming from the eye, and inflammation. NIH: National Eye Institute .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5092
Concept ID:
C0015397
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Disorder of cornea

Your cornea is the outermost layer of your eye. It is clear and shaped like a dome. The cornea helps to shield the rest of the eye from germs, dust, and other harmful matter. It also helps your eye to focus. If you wear contact lenses, they float on top of your corneas. . Problems with the cornea include: -Refractive errors. -Allergies. -Infections. -Injuries. -Dystrophies - conditions in which parts of the cornea lose clarity due to a buildup of cloudy material. Treatments of corneal disorders include medicines, corneal transplantation, and corneal laser surgery. NIH National Eye Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3617
Concept ID:
C0010034
Disease or Syndrome

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