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MedGen for PubMed (Select 15488249)

Items: 12

1.

Agoraphobia

A type of anxiety disorder characterized by avoidance of public places, especially where crowds gather. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504586
Concept ID:
CN000710
Finding
2.

Anxiety

MedGen UID:
409544
Concept ID:
C1963064
Finding
3.

Panic disorder 1

The DSM-IV (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) defines panic disorder as the spontaneous, unexpected occurrence of panic attacks followed by persistent concern, worry, and anxiety about having additional panic attacks. Panic attacks are defined as a discrete period of intense fear or discomfort in which at least 4 of 13 symptom criteria are met that develop abruptly and reach a peak within 10 minutes. Some of these criteria include cardiac palpitations, sweating, feelings of choking, fear of losing control, and fear of dying. Panic disorder is divided into panic disorder with or without accompanying agoraphobia. However, agoraphobia can also occur without panic disorder, and panic attacks can occur in the absence of panic disorder. Comorbidity with depressive and addictive disorders is frequent. Barlow et al. (1994) and Smoller and Tsuang (1998) noted that because the diagnostic criteria remain purely clinical, the nosology of anxiety disorders, such as panic disorder, is controversial and evolving. Therefore, it is difficult to do genetic studies because of the difficulty in delineating overlapping phenotypes within the broader context of anxiety disorders. For example, there may be overlap of panic with specific phobias, variable expressivity of panic and anxiety or depression, or phenocopies within a family. The terms 'anxiety neurosis' and 'phobic neurosis' were used in the past (before the DSM-III in 1980) to encompass all of these disorders. Smoller and Tsuang (1998) suggested that dimensional personality traits, such as shyness, behavioral inhibition, and neuroticism (see 607834), could be used to define an anxiety phenotype. Schumacher et al. (2011) provided a review of the genetics of panic disorder. They noted that there is high (80%) comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders, including agoraphobia, mood disorders, substance abuse, and other anxiety disorders. Associated personality traits include anxiety sensitivity, behavioral inhibition, neuroticism, and harm avoidance. Women are more susceptible to development of the disorder, which has an average age of onset at 23.6 years. Genetic Heterogeneity of Susceptibility to Panic Disorder See also PAND2 (607853), which has been mapped to chromosome 9, and PAND3 (609985), which has been mapped to chromosome 4. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
401493
Concept ID:
C1868649
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Anxiety

Human personality is shaped by genetic and environmental factors, and evidence suggests that the genetic component is highly complex, polygenic, and epistatic. Genetic factors are thought to contribute to 40 to 60% of trait variance. Molecular genetics has tried to identify specific genes for quantitative traits, called quantitative trait loci (QTLs). The QTL concept suggests that complex personality traits or dimensions are not attributable to single genes, but to multiple interacting genes (Reif and Lesch, 2003). Fullerton et al. (2003) stated that psychologists were in agreement that the wide variation in human personalities can be explained by a small number of personality factors, including neuroticism (a measure of emotional stability), which manifests at one extreme as anxiety, depression, moodiness, low self-esteem, and diffidence. They cited a number of studies that had described a relationship between high scores on measures of neuroticism and major depressive disorder. They also noted that theoretical studies had suggested that large samples of randomly ascertained sibs could be used to ascertain phenotypically extreme individuals and thereby increase power to detect genetic linkage in complex traits. See also panic disorder (PAND1; 167870), which is a subtype of anxiety disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
335849
Concept ID:
C1842981
Disease or Syndrome; Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
5.

Depression

MedGen UID:
137999
Concept ID:
C0344315
Finding
6.

Behavior disorder

any of various conditions characterized by impairment of an individual's normal behavioral functioning, and caused by social, psychological, biochemical, genetic, or other factors, such as infection or head trauma. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
520
Concept ID:
C0004930
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
7.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) manifests at age 2-3 years or by first grade at the latest. The main symptoms are distractibility, impulsivity, hyperactivity, and often trouble organizing tasks and projects, difficulty going to sleep, and social problems from being aggressive, loud, or impatient. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506017
Concept ID:
CN006126
Finding
8.

Hyperactivity

MedGen UID:
504585
Concept ID:
CN000708
Finding
9.

Behavioral abnormality

An abnormality of mental functioning including various affective, behavioural, cognitive and perceptual abnormalities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425007
Concept ID:
CN000665
Finding
10.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

Is it hard for your child to sit still? Does your child act without thinking first? Does your child start but not finish things? If so, your child may have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Nearly everyone shows some of these behaviors at times, but ADHD lasts more than 6 months and causes problems in school, at home and in social situations. ADHD is more common in boys than girls. It affects 3-5 percent of all American children. The main features of ADHD are. -Inattention. -Hyperactivity. -Impulsivity. No one knows exactly what causes ADHD. It sometimes runs in families, so genetics may be a factor. There may also be environmental factors. A complete evaluation by a trained professional is the only way to know for sure if your child has ADHD. Treatment may include medicine to control symptoms, therapy, or both. Structure at home and at school is important. Parent training may also help. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
220387
Concept ID:
C1263846
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
11.

Major depressive disorder

Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
266123
Concept ID:
C1269683
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
12.

Panic disorder 2

MedGen UID:
375048
Concept ID:
C1842922
Disease or Syndrome
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