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Items: 20

1.

Coronary artery calcification

Calcification, that is, pathological deposition of calcium salts, affecting the coronary arteries. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504928
Concept ID:
CN001562
Finding
2.

Coronary artery calcification

Calcification, that is, pathological deposition of calcium salts, affecting the coronary arteries. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
345985
Concept ID:
C1611184
Finding; Pathologic Function
3.

Calcinosis

Deposits of calcium in the tissues. Calcification in the breast can be seen on a mammogram, but cannot be detected by touch. There are two types of breast calcification, macrocalcification and microcalcification. Macrocalcifications are large deposits and are usually not related to cancer. Microcalcifications are specks of calcium that may be found in an area of rapidly dividing cells. Many microcalcifications clustered together may be a sign of cancer. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
288557
Concept ID:
C1533591
Finding; Organ or Tissue Function
4.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:. - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Coronary heart disease

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. As a result, the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts' blood supply, causing permanent heart damage. . Over time, CAD can also weaken the heart muscle and contribute to heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure means the heart can't pump blood well to the rest of the body. Arrhythmias are changes in the normal beating rhythm of the heart. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3624
Concept ID:
C0010068
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Calcinosis

Structure with calcium deposition [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
709
Concept ID:
C0006663
Finding; Pathologic Function
7.

Atherosclerosis

Atherosclerosis is a disease in which plaque builds up inside your arteries. Plaque is a sticky substance made up of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in the blood. Over time, plaque hardens and narrows your arteries. That limits the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Atherosclerosis can lead to serious problems, including. -Coronary artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your heart. When they are blocked, you can suffer angina or a heart attack. -Carotid artery disease. These arteries supply blood to your brain. When they are blocked you can suffer a stroke. -Peripheral arterial disease. These arteries are in your arms, legs and pelvis. When they are blocked, you can suffer from numbness, pain and sometimes infections. Atherosclerosis usually doesn't cause symptoms until it severely narrows or totally blocks an artery. Many people don't know they have it until they have a medical emergency. A physical exam, imaging, and other diagnostic tests can tell if you have it. Medicines can slow the progress of plaque buildup. Your doctor may also recommend procedures such as angioplasty to open the arteries, or surgery on the coronary or carotid arteries. Lifestyle changes can also help. These include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, maintaining a healthy weight, quitting smoking, and managing stress. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
13948
Concept ID:
C0004153
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Coronary atherosclerosis

Coronary artery disease, also called atherosclerotic heart disease, is the result of atheromatous plaques within the coronary arteries leading to myocardial ischemia and infarction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505722
Concept ID:
CN004372
Finding
9.

Atherosclerosis

A condition characterized by patchy atheromas or atherosclerotic plaques which develop in the walls of medium-sized and large arteries and can lead to arterial stenosis with reduced or blocked blood flow. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505298
Concept ID:
CN002382
Finding
10.

Asymptomatic

The finding of no indications of a particular disease or injury. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
65413
Concept ID:
C0231221
Finding
11.

Congenital heart disease

Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a term that refers to a group of serious heart defects that are present from birth. These abnormalities result from problems with the formation of one or more parts of the heart during the early stages of embryonic development. CCHD prevents the heart from pumping blood effectively or reduces the amount of oxygen in the blood. As a result, organs and tissues throughout the body do not receive enough oxygen, which can lead to organ damage and life-threatening complications. Individuals with CCHD usually require surgery soon after birth.Although babies with CCHD may appear healthy for the first few hours or days of life, signs and symptoms soon become apparent. These can include an abnormal heart sound during a heartbeat (heart murmur), rapid breathing (tachypnea), low blood pressure (hypotension), low levels of oxygen in the blood (hypoxemia), and a blue or purple tint to the skin caused by a shortage of oxygen (cyanosis). If untreated, CCHD can lead to shock, coma, and death. However, most people with CCHD now survive past infancy due to improvements in early detection, diagnosis, and treatment.Some people with treated CCHD have few related health problems later in life. However, long-term effects of CCHD can include delayed development and reduced stamina during exercise. Adults with these heart defects have an increased risk of abnormal heart rhythms, heart failure, sudden cardiac arrest, stroke, and premature death.Each of the heart defects associated with CCHD affects the flow of blood into, out of, or through the heart. Some of the heart defects involve structures within the heart itself, such as the two lower chambers of the heart (the ventricles) or the valves that control blood flow through the heart. Others affect the structure of the large blood vessels leading into and out of the heart (including the aorta and pulmonary artery). Still others involve a combination of these structural abnormalities.People with CCHD have one or more specific heart defects. The heart defects classified as CCHD include coarctation of the aorta, double-outlet right ventricle, D-transposition of the great arteries, Ebstein anomaly, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, interrupted aortic arch, pulmonary atresia with intact septum, single ventricle, total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, tetralogy of Fallot, tricuspid atresia, and truncus arteriosus.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
57501
Concept ID:
C0152021
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
12.

Coronary Arteriosclerosis

Coronary artery disease, also called atherosclerotic heart disease, is the result of atheromatous plaques within the coronary arteries leading to myocardial ischemia and infarction. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3623
Concept ID:
C0010054
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Tumoral calcinosis

An extremely rare benign condition characterized by large calcified periarticular soft tissue masses composed of calcium salts, usually located around large joints. Tumoral calcinosis can occur due to HYPERPHOSPHATEMIA in patients with UREMIA and/or who are undergoing RENAL DIALYSIS. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
452340
Concept ID:
C0263628
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of coronary artery

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to heart muscle become hardened and narrowed. This is due to the buildup of cholesterol and other material, called plaque, on their inner walls. This buildup is called atherosclerosis. As it grows, less blood can flow through the arteries. As a result, the heart muscle can't get the blood or oxygen it needs. This can lead to chest pain (angina) or a heart attack. Most heart attacks happen when a blood clot suddenly cuts off the hearts' blood supply, causing permanent heart damage. . Over time, CAD can also weaken the heart muscle and contribute to heart failure and arrhythmias. Heart failure means the heart can't pump blood well to the rest of the body. Arrhythmias are changes in the normal beating rhythm of the heart. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
365486
Concept ID:
C1956346
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
16.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Vascular disorder

The vascular system is the body's network of blood vessels. It includes the arteries, veins and capillaries that carry blood to and from the heart. Problems of the vascular system are common and can be serious. Arteries can become thick and stiff, a problem called atherosclerosis. Blood clots can clog vessels and block blood flow to the heart or brain. Weakened blood vessels can burst, causing bleeding inside the body. . You are more likely to have vascular disease as you get older. Other factors that make vascular disease more likely include. - Family history of vascular or heart diseases. - Pregnancy. - Illness or injury . - Long periods of sitting or standing still. - Any condition that affects the heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol . - Smoking . - Obesity . Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
22621
Concept ID:
C0042373
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Peripheral artery occlusive disease

A narrowing of the peripheral arteries (i.e., of arteries other than thos that supply the heart and the brain). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
13913
Concept ID:
C0003838
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

Any abnormality of the cardiovascular system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Arteriosclerosis

Sclerosis (hardening) of the arteries with increased thickness of the wall of arteries as well as increased stiffness and a loss of elasticity. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
2076
Concept ID:
C0003850
Disease or Syndrome
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