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Results: 4

1.

Infections

MedGen UID:
833099
Concept ID:
CN228891
Finding
2.

Short stature, onychodysplasia, facial dysmorphism, and hypotrichosis

SOFT syndrome is characterized by severely short long bones, peculiar facies associated with paucity of hair, and nail anomalies. Growth retardation is evident on prenatal ultrasound as early as the second trimester of pregnancy, and affected individuals reach a final stature consistent with a height age of 6 years to 8 years. Relative macrocephaly is present during early childhood but head circumference is markedly low by adulthood. Psychomotor development is normal. Facial dysmorphism includes a long, triangular face with prominent nose and small ears, and affected individuals have an unusual high-pitched voice. Clinodactyly, brachydactyly, and hypoplastic distal phalanges and fingernails are present in association with postpubertal sparse and short hair. Typical skeletal findings include short and thick long bones with mild irregular metaphyseal changes, short femoral necks, and hypoplastic pelvis and sacrum. All long bones of the hand are short, with major delay of carpal ossification and cone-shaped epiphyses. Vertebral body ossification is also delayed (summary by Sarig et al., 2012). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
762199
Concept ID:
C3542022
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Respiratory tract infection

An infection of the upper or lower respiratory tract. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506629
Concept ID:
CN167673
Finding
4.

Hereditary spastic paraplegia

The hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) are clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by lower extremity spasticity and weakness (occurring in variable proportion). When symptoms begin after childhood, they usually progress slowly and steadily. When symptoms begin in very early childhood, they may be non-progressive and resemble spastic diplegic cerebral palsy. HSP is classified as "uncomplicated" if neurologic impairment is limited to lower extremity spastic weakness, hypertonic urinary bladder disturbance, and mild diminution of lower extremity vibration sensation. HSP is classified as "complicated" if the impairment present in uncomplicated HSP is accompanied by other systemic or neurologic abnormalities such as ataxia, seizures, cognitive impairment, dementia, amyotrophy, extrapyramidal disturbance, or peripheral neuropathy (in the absence of other causes for these additional features). Neurologic examination of individuals with uncomplicated HSP demonstrates variable degrees of increased muscle tone (spasticity) particularly in the hamstrings, quadriceps, gastrocnemius-soleus, and adductor muscles; weakness in the iliopsoas, hamstring, and tibialis anterior muscles; hyperreflexia at the patella and ankles; often (though not always) mildly reduced vibration sensation in the toes; extensor plantar responses; and spastic gait. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
20844
Concept ID:
C0037773
Disease or Syndrome

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