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Results: 5

1.

Smallpox

Smallpox is a disease caused by the Variola major virus. Some experts say that over the centuries it has killed more people than all other infectious diseases combined. Worldwide immunization stopped the spread of smallpox three decades ago. The last case was reported in 1977. Two research labs still keep small amounts of the virus. Experts fear bioterrorists could use the virus to spread disease. Smallpox spreads very easily from person to person. Symptoms are flu-like. They include: -High fever. -Fatigue. -Headache. -Backache. -A rash with flat red sores. There is no treatment. Fluids and medicines for pain or fever can help control symptoms. Most people recover, but some can die. Those who do recover may have severe scars. The U.S. stopped routine smallpox vaccinations in 1972. Military and other high-risk groups continue to get the vaccine. The U.S. has increased its supply of the vaccine in recent years. The vaccine makes some people sick, so doctors save it for those at highest risk of disease. . NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20785
Concept ID:
C0037354
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Dermatitis

An inflammatory process affecting the skin. Signs include red rash, itching, and blister formation. Representative examples are contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
4233
Concept ID:
C0011603
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Eczema

Eczema is a form of dermatitis. The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions and can be related to a number of underlying conditions. Manifestations of eczema can include dryness and recurring skin rashes with redness, skin edema, itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504663
Concept ID:
CN000902
Finding
4.

Spongiotic dermatitis

A chronic inflammatory skin condition characterized by itchiness and a rash in the chest and abdominal areas. It affects males more than females and is usually contracted at a relatively young age. It is thought to be caused by an allergic reaction to food, insect bites, or medication. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
120468
Concept ID:
C0262984
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Pityriasis rosea

A mild exanthematous inflammation of unknown etiology. It is characterized by the presence of salmon-colored maculopapular lesions. The most striking feature is the arrangement of the lesions such that the long axis is parallel to the lines of cleavage. The eruptions are usually generalized, affecting chiefly the trunk, and the course is often self-limiting. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18492
Concept ID:
C0032026
Disease or Syndrome

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