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Results: 10

1.

Paraganglioma

A rare, usually benign tumor that develops from cells of the paraganglia. Paraganglia are a collection of cells that came from embryonic nervous tissue, and are found near the adrenal glands and some blood vessels and nerves. Paragangliomas that develop in the adrenal gland are called pheochromocytomas. Those that develop outside of the adrenal glands near blood vessels or nerves are called glomus tumors or chemodectomas. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10571
Concept ID:
C0030421
Neoplastic Process
2.

Paraganglioma

A carotid body tumor (also called paraganglionoma or chemodectoma) is a tumor found in the upper neck at the branching of the carotid artery. They arise from the chemoreceptor organ (paraganglion) located in the adventitia of the carotid artery bifurcation. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505325
Concept ID:
CN002425
Finding
3.

Gastrointestinal stroma tumor

MedGen UID:
451979
Concept ID:
CN117614
Finding
4.

Carney complex, type 1

Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by skin pigmentary abnormalities, myxomas, endocrine tumors or overactivity, and schwannomas. Pale brown to black lentigines are the most common presenting feature of CNC and typically increase in number at puberty. Cardiac myxomas occur at a young age, may occur in any or all cardiac chambers, and manifest as intracardiac obstruction of blood flow, embolic phenomena, and/or heart failure. Other sites for myxomas include the skin, breast, oropharynx, and female genital tract. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which causes Cushing syndrome, is the most frequently observed endocrine tumor in CNC, occurring in approximately 25% of affected individuals. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCTs) are observed in one third of affected males within the first decade and in almost all adult males. Up to 75% of individuals with CNC have multiple thyroid nodules, most of which are thyroid follicular adenomas. Clinically evident acromegaly from a growth hormone (GH)-producing adenoma is evident in approximately 10% of adults. Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS), a rare tumor of the nerve sheath, occurs in an estimated 10% of affected individuals. The median age of diagnosis is 20 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
388559
Concept ID:
C2607929
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Paraganglioma and gastric stromal sarcoma

A rare, inherited disorder marked by tumors of the gastrointestinal tract and tumors that form in embryonic nervous tissue in the head, neck, and torso. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
376098
Concept ID:
C1847319
Neoplastic Process
6.

Stromal Neoplasm

A tumor that arises in the supporting connective tissue of an organ. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
209308
Concept ID:
C0879615
Neoplastic Process
7.

Carney complex

Carney complex (CNC) is characterized by skin pigmentary abnormalities, myxomas, endocrine tumors or overactivity, and schwannomas. Pale brown to black lentigines are the most common presenting feature of CNC and typically increase in number at puberty. Cardiac myxomas occur at a young age, may occur in any or all cardiac chambers, and manifest as intracardiac obstruction of blood flow, embolic phenomena, and/or heart failure. Other sites for myxomas include the skin, breast, oropharynx, and female genital tract. Primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD), which causes Cushing syndrome, is the most frequently observed endocrine tumor in CNC, occurring in approximately 25% of affected individuals. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCCSCTs) are observed in one third of affected males within the first decade and in almost all adult males. Up to 75% of individuals with CNC have multiple thyroid nodules, most of which are thyroid follicular adenomas. Clinically evident acromegaly from a growth hormone (GH)-producing adenoma is evident in approximately 10% of adults. Psammomatous melanotic schwannoma (PMS), a rare tumor of the nerve sheath, occurs in an estimated 10% of affected individuals. The median age of diagnosis is 20 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
140810
Concept ID:
C0406810
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

Gastrointestinal stromal tumors are mesenchymal tumors found in the gastrointestinal tract that originate from the interstitial cells of Cajal, the pacemaker cells that regulate peristalsis in the digestive tract. Approximately 70% of GISTs develop in the stomach, 20% in the small intestine, and less than 10% in the esophagus, colon, and rectum. GISTs are typically more cellular than other gastrointestinal sarcomas. They occur predominantly in patients who are 40 to 70 years old but in rare cases may occur in younger persons (Miettinen et al., 1999, 1999). GISTs can also be seen in neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1; 162200) due to mutations in the NF1 gene, and are thus distinct from the GISTs described here. Sandberg and Bridge (2002) reviewed the cytogenetics and molecular genetics of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Coffey et al. (2007) reviewed the clinical features, pathogenesis, and molecular treatments of Menetrier disease (137280) and GIST, both of which are hyperproliferative disorders of the stomach caused by dysregulated receptor tyrosine kinases. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
116049
Concept ID:
C0238198
Neoplastic Process
9.

Chemodectoma

A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
18289
Concept ID:
C0030422
Neoplastic Process
10.

Carney triad

A very rare disorder marked by tumors of the gastrointestinal tract (usually the stomach), tumors that form in embryonic nervous tissue in the head, neck, and torso, and tumors that form in cartilage in the lungs. Sometimes tumors also form in the adrenal glands and esophagus. Carney triad is most common in young females. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
388099
Concept ID:
C1858592
Disease or Syndrome

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