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Items: 18

1.

Stiff-man syndrome

The stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is most often an adult-onset sporadic acquired disorder characterized by progressive muscle stiffness with superimposed painful muscle spasms accompanied by electromyographic evidence of continuous motor activity at rest. SPS has been associated with autoimmune disorders, diabetes mellitus, thyrotoxicosis, and hypopituitarism with adrenal insufficiency (George et al., 1984). Approximately 60% of patients with SPS have antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD2, or GAD65; 138275), the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting an immune-mediated pathogenesis (Folli et al., 1993). Approximately 10% of patients develop SPS as a paraneoplastic neurologic disorder associated with antibodies to amphiphysin (AMPH; 600418), an intracellular protein associated with neuronal synaptic vesicle endocytosis (Burns, 2005). See also congenital stiff-man syndrome, or hereditary hyperexplexia (149400), which is caused by mutations in subunits of the glycine receptor gene (GLRA1, 138491; GLRB, 138492). Meinck and Thompson (2002) provided a detailed review of stiff-person syndrome. They also discussed 2 possibly related conditions, progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity (PERM), a more severe disorder with other neurologic features, and stiff-limb or stiff-leg syndrome, a focal disorder. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
39017
Concept ID:
C0085292
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Fever

A fever is a body temperature that is higher than normal. It is not an illness. It is part of your body's defense against infection. Most bacteria and viruses that cause infections do well at the body's normal temperature (98.6 F). A slight fever can make it harder for them to survive. Fever also activates your body's immune system. Infections cause most fevers. There can be many other causes, including. - Medicines. - Heat exhaustion. - Cancers. - Autoimmune diseases. Treatment depends on the cause of your fever. Your health care provider may recommend using over-the-counter medicines such as acetaminophen or ibuprofen to lower a very high fever. Adults can also take aspirin, but children with fevers should not take aspirin. It is also important to drink enough liquids to prevent dehydration.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5169
Concept ID:
C0015967
Finding
3.

West-Nile encephalitis

family transmitted by an infected mosquito, that is asymptomatic in the majority of cases but that can present in rare occasions with mild flulike symptoms such as low-grade fever, arthralgia, myalgia, and/or rash, or with neurologic manifestations including meningitis, encephalitis with mental confusion or disorientation, tremors and acute flaccid paralysis/poliomyelitis. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798565
Concept ID:
CN206069
Finding
4.

Noonan syndrome 1

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
22527
Concept ID:
C0041409
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Noonan syndrome

Noonan syndrome (NS) is characterized by characteristic facies, short stature, congenital heart defect, and developmental delay of variable degree. Other findings can include broad or webbed neck, unusual chest shape with superior pectus carinatum and inferior pectus excavatum, cryptorchidism, varied coagulation defects, lymphatic dysplasias, and ocular abnormalities. Although birth length is usually normal, final adult height approaches the lower limit of normal. Congenital heart disease occurs in 50%-80% of individuals. Pulmonary valve stenosis, often with dysplasia, is the most common heart defect and is found in 20%-50% of individuals. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, found in 20%-30% of individuals, may be present at birth or develop in infancy or childhood. Other structural defects include atrial and ventricular septal defects, branch pulmonary artery stenosis, and tetralogy of Fallot. Up to one fourth of affected individuals have mild intellectual disability, and language impairments in general are more common in NS than in the general population. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18073
Concept ID:
C0028326
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
6.

Infective encephalitis

Brain inflammation caused by an infectious agent.. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
108917
Concept ID:
C0596773
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Myelopathy

Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back and forth between your body and your brain. It is protected by your vertebrae, which are the bone disks that make up your spine. If you have an accident that damages the vertebrae or other parts of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include. - Tumors. - Infections such as meningitis and polio. - Inflammatory diseases. - Autoimmune diseases . - Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy. Symptoms vary but might include pain, numbness, loss of sensation and muscle weakness. These symptoms can occur around the spinal cord, and also in other areas such as your arms and legs. Treatments often include medicines and surgery. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
11550
Concept ID:
C0037928
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Neuromuscular Diseases

Neuromuscular disorders affect the nerves that control your voluntary muscles. Voluntary muscles are the ones you can control, like in your arms and legs. Your nerve cells, also called neurons, send the messages that control these muscles. When the neurons become unhealthy or die, communication between your nervous system and muscles breaks down. As a result, your muscles weaken and waste away. The weakness can lead to twitching, cramps, aches and pains, and joint and movement problems. Sometimes it also affects heart function and your ability to breathe. Examples of neuromuscular disorders include. -Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. -Multiple sclerosis. -Myasthenia gravis. -Spinal muscular atrophy. Many neuromuscular diseases are genetic, which means they run in families or there is a mutation in your genes. Sometimes, an immune system disorder can cause them. Most of them have no cure. The goal of treatment is to improve symptoms, increase mobility and lengthen life.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10323
Concept ID:
C0027868
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Encephalitis

Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain. Usually the cause is a viral infection, but bacteria can also cause it. It can be mild or severe. Most cases are mild. You may have flu-like symptoms. With a mild case, you may just need rest, plenty of fluids, and a pain reliever. Severe cases need immediate treatment. Symptoms of severe cases include. -Severe headache. -Sudden fever. -Drowsiness . -Vomiting. -Confusion. -Seizures. In babies, additional symptoms may include constant crying, poor feeding, body stiffness, and bulging in the soft spots of the skull. Severe cases may require a stay in the hospital. Treatments include oral and intravenous medicines to reduce inflammation and treat infection. Patients with breathing difficulties may need artificial respiration. Some people may need physical, speech, and occupational therapy once the illness is under control. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
4027
Concept ID:
C0014038
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Disorder of the central nervous system

A structural abnormality of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3306
Concept ID:
C0007682
Disease or Syndrome
11.

CNS infection

Pathogenic infections of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges. DNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; RNA VIRUS INFECTIONS; BACTERIAL INFECTIONS; MYCOPLASMA INFECTIONS; SPIROCHAETALES INFECTIONS; fungal infections; PROTOZOAN INFECTIONS; HELMINTHIASIS; and PRION DISEASES may involve the central nervous system as a primary or secondary process. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
2948
Concept ID:
C0007684
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Autoimmune disease

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling. The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Exaggerated startle response

An exaggerated startle reaction in response to a sudden unexpected visual or acoustic stimulus, or a quick movement near the face. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505176
Concept ID:
CN002058
Finding
14.

Hyperekplexia

Hereditary hyperekplexia (HPX) is characterized by generalized stiffness immediately after birth that normalizes during the first years of life; excessive startle reflex (eye blinking and a flexor spasm of the trunk) to unexpected (particularly auditory) stimuli; and a short period of generalized stiffness following the startle response during which voluntary movements are impossible. Exaggerated head-retraction reflex (HRR) consisting of extension of the head followed by violent flexor spasms of limbs and neck muscles elicited by tapping the tip of the nose is observed in most children. Other findings include periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and hypnagogic (occurring when falling asleep) myoclonus. Sudden infant death (SIDS) has been reported. Intellect is usually normal; mild intellectual disability may occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
488800
Concept ID:
C0234166
Sign or Symptom
15.

Hyperekplexia hereditary

Hereditary hyperekplexia (HPX) is characterized by generalized stiffness immediately after birth that normalizes during the first years of life; excessive startle reflex (eye blinking and a flexor spasm of the trunk) to unexpected (particularly auditory) stimuli; and a short period of generalized stiffness following the startle response during which voluntary movements are impossible. Exaggerated head-retraction reflex (HRR) consisting of extension of the head followed by violent flexor spasms of limbs and neck muscles elicited by tapping the tip of the nose is observed in most children. Other findings include periodic limb movements in sleep (PLMS) and hypnagogic (occurring when falling asleep) myoclonus. Sudden infant death (SIDS) has been reported. Intellect is usually normal; mild intellectual disability may occur. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
332019
Concept ID:
C1835614
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Hyperekplexia 2

MedGen UID:
766205
Concept ID:
C3553291
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hyperekplexia 3

MedGen UID:
766202
Concept ID:
C3553288
Disease or Syndrome
18.

TAU syndrome

MedGen UID:
419063
Concept ID:
C2931372
Disease or Syndrome
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