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Results: 1 to 20 of 46

1.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymphatic system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is called Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphoma. . Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors can't determine why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. . Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as : -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will perform an exam and lab tests to determine if you have lymphoma. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
2.

Infection

Unknown contamination with disease-producing germs. [from HHCC]

MedGen UID:
43874
Concept ID:
C0021311
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Communicable Diseases

Infectious diseases kill more people worldwide than any other single cause. Infectious diseases are caused by germs. Germs are tiny living things that are found everywhere - in air, soil and water. You can get infected by touching, eating, drinking or breathing something that contains a germ. Germs can also spread through animal and insect bites, kissing and sexual contact. Vaccines, proper hand washing and medicines can help prevent infections. . There are four main kinds of germs: : - Bacteria - one-celled germs that multiply quickly and may release chemicals which can make you sick. - Viruses - capsules that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply. - Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew . - Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live. NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1057
Concept ID:
C0009450
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a heterogeneous group of malignant lymphoid neoplasms of B-cell origin characterized histologically by the presence of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in the vast majority of cases. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
799611
Concept ID:
CN206988
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hodgkin lymphoma

A typer of lymphoma characterized microscopically by multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
776519
Concept ID:
CN167915
Finding
6.

Lymphoma

A cancer originating in lymphocytes and presenting as a solid tumor of lymhpoid cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505322
Concept ID:
CN002422
Finding
7.

Epstein-Barr Virus Infections

Infection with human herpesvirus 4 (HERPESVIRUS 4, HUMAN); which may facilitate the development of various lymphoproliferative disorders. These include BURKITT LYMPHOMA (African type), INFECTIOUS MONONUCLEOSIS, and oral hairy leukoplakia (LEUKOPLAKIA, HAIRY). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
57439
Concept ID:
C0149678
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hodgkin lymphoma

Hodgkin disease is a type of lymphoma. Lymphoma is cancer of lymph tissue found in the lymph nodes, spleen, liver, and bone marrow. The first sign of Hodgkin disease is often an enlarged lymph node. The disease can spread to nearby lymph nodes. Later it may spread to the lungs, liver or bone marrow. The cause is unknown. . Hodgkin disease is rare. Symptoms include: -Painless swelling of the lymph nodes in the neck, armpits, or groin . -Fever and chills . -Night sweats . -Weight loss . -Loss of appetite . -Itchy skin. Doctors can diagnose Hodgkin disease with a biopsy. This involves removing and examining a piece of tissue under a microscope. Treatment varies depending on how far the disease has spread and often includes radiation therapy or chemotherapy. . The earlier the disease is diagnosed, the more effective the treatment. In most cases, Hodgkin disease can be cured. . NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9283
Concept ID:
C0019829
Neoplastic Process
9.

Composite Lymphoma

Two or more distinct types of malignant lymphoid tumors occurring within a single organ or tissue at the same time. It may contain different types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells or both Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma cells. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
107468
Concept ID:
C0545080
Neoplastic Process
10.

Mantle cell lymphoma

Mantle cell lymphoma is a rare form of malignant non-Hodgkin lymphoma (see this term) affecting B lymphocytes in the lymph nodes in a region called the ``mantle zone''. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
798955
Concept ID:
CN205223
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

A typer of lymphoma characterized microscopically by the absence of multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
776527
Concept ID:
CN182652
Finding
12.

Composite Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

MedGen UID:
690133
Concept ID:
C1266191
Neoplastic Process
13.

LEIOMYOMA, MULTIPLE CUTANEOUS

MedGen UID:
372056
Concept ID:
C1835485
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer

Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is characterized by cutaneous leiomyomata (multiple or single in 76% of affected individuals), uterine leiomyomata (fibroids), and/or a single renal tumor. Cutaneous leiomyomata appear as skin-colored to light brown papules or nodules distributed over the trunk and extremities, and occasionally on the face, and appear at a mean age of 25 years, increasing in size and number with age. Uterine leiomyomata are present in almost all females with HLRCC and tend to be numerous and large; age at diagnosis ranges from 18 to 52 years, with most women experiencing irregular or heavy menstruation and pelvic pain. Renal tumors causing hematuria, lower back pain, and a palpable mass are usually unilateral, solitary, and aggressive and range from type 2 papillary to tubulo-papillary to collecting-duct carcinomas. They occur in about 10%-16% of individuals with HLRCC; the median age of detection is 44 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
353771
Concept ID:
C1708350
Neoplastic Process
15.

Pathogenesis

specific processes that generate the ability of an organism to cause disease [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
195936
Concept ID:
C0699748
Pathologic Function
16.

Dentatorubral pallidoluysian atrophy

Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is a progressive disorder of ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia or character changes in adults and ataxia, myoclonus, epilepsy, and progressive intellectual deterioration in children. The age of onset is from one to 62 years with a mean age of onset of 30 years. The clinical presentation varies depending on the age of onset. The cardinal features in adults are ataxia, choreoathetosis, and dementia. Cardinal features in children are progressive intellectual deterioration, behavioral changes, myoclonus, and epilepsy. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
155630
Concept ID:
C0751781
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Mantle cell lymphoma

A form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma having a usually diffuse pattern with both small and medium lymphocytes and small cleaved cells. It accounts for about 5% of adult non-Hodgkin lymphomas in the United States and Europe. The majority of mantle-cell lymphomas are associated with a t(11;14) translocation resulting in overexpression of the CYCLIN D1 gene (GENES, BCL-1). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
87278
Concept ID:
C0334634
Neoplastic Process
18.

Finding

The result of an examination or inquiry. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
66215
Concept ID:
C0243095
Finding
19.

Clinical finding

clinical manifestations that can be either objective when observed by a physician, or subjective when perceived by the patient. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
19974
Concept ID:
C0037088
Sign or Symptom
20.

Malignant lymphoma, non-Hodgkin

Any of a large group of cancers of lymphocytes (white blood cells). NHLs can occur at any age and are often marked by lymph nodes that are larger than normal, fever, and weight loss. There are many different types of NHL. These types can be divided into aggressive (fast-growing) and indolent (slow-growing) types, and they can be formed from either B-cells or T-cells. B-cell NHLs include Burkitt lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, immunoblastic large cell lymphoma, precursor B-lymphoblastic lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma. T-cell NHLs include mycosis fungoides, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, and precursor T-lymphoblastic lymphoma. Lymphomas that occur after bone marrow or stem cell transplantation are usually B-cell NHLs. Prognosis and treatment depend on the stage and type of disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
6160
Concept ID:
C0024305
Neoplastic Process

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