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Items: 1 to 20 of 23

1.

Proportionate short stature; mild intellectual disability; dysmorphic facial features; precocious puberty

MedGen UID:
850705
Concept ID:
CN231399
Finding
2.

Achromatopsia

A condition where the retina contains no functional cone cells, so that in addition to the absence of color discrimination, vision in lights of normal intensity is difficult. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506586
Concept ID:
CN167244
Finding
3.

Monochromacy

MedGen UID:
387862
Concept ID:
C1857589
Finding
4.

Rod monochromatism

A condition where the retina contains no functional cone cells, so that in addition to the absence of color discrimination, vision in lights of normal intensity is difficult. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
137059
Concept ID:
C0302129
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Achromatopsia

Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The symptoms are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
57751
Concept ID:
C0152200
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Delay

MedGen UID:
879911
Concept ID:
CN235300
Finding
7.

Dysmorphism

MedGen UID:
832917
Concept ID:
CN228290
Finding
8.

deceased

MedGen UID:
807672
Concept ID:
CN220451
Finding
9.

Global developmental delay

A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504774
Concept ID:
CN001157
Finding
10.

Cone dystrophy 4

Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The symptoms are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
416518
Concept ID:
C2751308
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Short stature, idiopathic, X-linked

Idiopathic short stature is usually defined as a height below the third percentile for chronological age or minus 2 standard deviations (SD) of national height standards in the absence of specific causative disorders (Rao et al., 1997). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of quantitative trait loci for stature, see STQTL1 (606255). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375584
Concept ID:
C1845118
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
12.

Growth control, Y-chromosome influenced

MedGen UID:
358267
Concept ID:
C1868676
Finding
13.

Retinal cone dystrophy 3A

MedGen UID:
355864
Concept ID:
C1864900
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Short stature, idiopathic, autosomal

MedGen UID:
346958
Concept ID:
C1858656
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Mild developmental delay

MedGen UID:
338529
Concept ID:
C1848735
Finding
16.

Achromatopsia 4

Achromatopsia is characterized by reduced visual acuity, pendular nystagmus, increased sensitivity to light (photophobia), a small central scotoma, eccentric fixation, and reduced or complete loss of color discrimination. All individuals with achromatopsia (achromats) have impaired color discrimination along all three axes of color vision corresponding to the three cone classes: the protan or long-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (red), the deutan or middle-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (green), and the tritan or short-wavelength-sensitive cone axis (blue). Most individuals have complete achromatopsia, with total lack of function of all three types of cones. Rarely, individuals have incomplete achromatopsia, in which one or more cone types may be partially functioning. The symptoms are similar to those of individuals with complete achromatopsia, but generally less severe. Hyperopia is common in achromatopsia. Nystagmus develops during the first few weeks after birth followed by increased sensitivity to bright light. Best visual acuity varies with severity of the disease; it is 20/200 or less in complete achromatopsia and may be as high as 20/80 in incomplete achromatopsia. Visual acuity is usually stable over time; both nystagmus and sensitivity to bright light may improve slightly. Although the fundus is usually normal, macular changes (which may show early signs of progression) and vessel narrowing may be present in some affected individuals. Defects in the macula are visible on optical coherence tomography. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
330669
Concept ID:
C1841721
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Mild

Mild; asymptomatic or mild symptoms; clinical or diagnostic observations only; intervention not indicated. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
268697
Concept ID:
C1513302
Finding
18.

Small hand

Disproportionately small hand. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
108279
Concept ID:
C0575802
Finding
19.

Global developmental delay

A delay in the achievement of motor or mental milestones in the domains of development of a child, including motor skills, speech and language, cognitive skills, and social and emotional skills. This term should only be used to describe children younger than five years of age. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
107838
Concept ID:
C0557874
Finding; Finding
20.

Developmental delay

Failure to meet, or late achievement of developmental milestones. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
98410
Concept ID:
C0424605
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
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