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1.

ovarian cancer

MedGen UID:
880186
Concept ID:
CN235601
Finding
2.

Ovarian cancer

Ovarian cancer is a disease that affects women. In this form of cancer, certain cells in the ovary become abnormal and multiply uncontrollably to form a tumor. The ovaries are the female reproductive organs in which egg cells are produced. In about 90 percent of cases, ovarian cancer occurs after age 40, and most cases occur after age 60.The most common form of ovarian cancer begins in epithelial cells, which are the cells that line the surfaces and cavities of the body. These cancers can arise in the epithelial cells on the surface of the ovary. However, researchers suggest that many or even most ovarian cancers begin in epithelial cells on the fringes (fimbriae) at the end of one of the fallopian tubes, and the cancerous cells migrate to the ovary.Cancer can also begin in epithelial cells that form the lining of the abdomen (the peritoneum). This form of cancer, called primary peritoneal cancer, resembles epithelial ovarian cancer in its origin, symptoms, progression, and treatment. Primary peritoneal cancer often spreads to the ovaries. It can also occur even if the ovaries have been removed. Because cancers that begin in the ovaries, fallopian tubes, and peritoneum are so similar and spread easily from one of these structures to the others, they are often difficult to distinguish. These cancers are so closely related that they are generally considered collectively by experts.In about 10 percent of cases, ovarian cancer develops not in epithelial cells but in germ cells, which are precursors to egg cells, or in hormone-producing ovarian cells called granulosa cells.In its early stages, ovarian cancer usually does not cause noticeable symptoms. As the cancer progresses, signs and symptoms can include pain or a feeling of heaviness in the pelvis or lower abdomen, bloating, feeling full quickly when eating, back pain, vaginal bleeding between menstrual periods or after menopause, or changes in urinary or bowel habits. However, these changes can occur as part of many different conditions. Having one or more of these symptoms does not mean that a woman has ovarian cancer.In some cases, cancerous tumors can invade surrounding tissue and spread to other parts of the body. If ovarian cancer spreads, cancerous tumors most often appear in the abdominal cavity or on the surfaces of nearby organs such as the bladder or colon. Tumors that begin at one site and then spread to other areas of the body are called metastatic cancers.Some ovarian cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary and are associated with inherited gene mutations. Hereditary ovarian cancers tend to develop earlier in life than non-inherited (sporadic) cases.Because it is often diagnosed at a late stage, ovarian cancer can be difficult to treat; it leads to the deaths of about 140,000 women annually, more than any other gynecological cancer. However, when it is diagnosed and treated early, the 5-year survival rate is high.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
216027
Concept ID:
C1140680
Neoplastic Process
3.

Neoplasm of ovary

Ovarian cancer, the leading cause of death from gynecologic malignancy, is characterized by advanced presentation with loco-regional dissemination in the peritoneal cavity and the rare incidence of visceral metastases (Chi et al., 2001). These typical features relate to the biology of the disease, which is a principal determinant of outcome (Auersperg et al., 2001). Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most common form and encompasses 5 major histologic subtypes: papillary serous, endometrioid, mucinous, clear cell, and transitional cell. Epithelial ovarian cancer arises as a result of genetic alterations sustained by the ovarian surface epithelium (Stany et al., 2008; Soslow, 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
181539
Concept ID:
C0919267
Neoplastic Process
4.

Malignant neoplasm of brain

Cancer of the brain is usually called a brain tumor. There are two main types. A primary brain tumor starts in the brain. A metastatic brain tumor starts somewhere else in the body and moves to the brain. Brain tumors can be benign, with no cancer cells, or malignant, with cancer cells that grow quickly. Brain tumors can cause many symptoms. Some of the most common are. - Headaches, usually worse in the morning . - Nausea and vomiting. - Changes in your ability to talk, hear, or see. - Problems with balance or walking. - Problems with thinking or memory . - Muscle jerking or twitching. - Numbness or tingling in arms or legs. Doctors diagnose brain tumors by doing a neurologic exam and tests including an MRI, CT scan, and biopsy. People with brain tumors have several treatment options. The options are surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Many people get a combination of treatments. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
57796
Concept ID:
C0153633
Neoplastic Process
5.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is a cancer of a part of the immune system called the lymph system. There are many types of lymphoma. One type is Hodgkin disease. The rest are called non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas begin when a type of white blood cell, called a T cell or B cell, becomes abnormal. The cell divides again and again, making more and more abnormal cells. These abnormal cells can spread to almost any other part of the body. Most of the time, doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have a weakened immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as . -Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits or groin. -Unexplained weight loss . -Fever . -Soaking night sweats . -Coughing, trouble breathing or chest pain . -Weakness and tiredness that don't go away . -Pain, swelling or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen . Your doctor will diagnose lymphoma with a physical exam, blood tests, a chest x-ray, and a biopsy. Treatments include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, targeted therapy, biological therapy, or therapy to remove proteins from the blood. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. If you don't have symptoms, you may not need treatment right away. This is called watchful waiting. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44223
Concept ID:
C0024299
Neoplastic Process
6.

Malignant melanoma

Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. Often the first sign of melanoma is a change in the size, shape, color, or feel of a mole. Most melanomas have a black or black-blue area. Melanoma may also appear as a new mole. It may be black, abnormal, or ugly looking.. Thinking of ABCDE can help you remember what to watch for:. - Asymmetry - the shape of one half does not match the other. - Border - the edges are ragged, blurred or irregular. - Color - the color is uneven and may include shades of black, brown and tan. - Diameter - there is a change in size, usually an increase. -Evolving - the mole has changed over the past few weeks or months. Surgery is the first treatment of all stages of melanoma. Other treatments include chemotherapy and radiation, biologic, and targeted therapies. Biologic therapy boosts your body's own ability to fight cancer. Targeted therapy uses substances that attack cancer cells without harming normal cells. NIH: National Cancer Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9944
Concept ID:
C0025202
Neoplastic Process
7.

brain cancer

MedGen UID:
880200
Concept ID:
CN235589
Finding
8.

bladder cancer

MedGen UID:
880168
Concept ID:
CN235588
Finding
9.

Melanoma

The presence of a melanoma, a malignant cancer originating from pigment producing melanocytes. Melanoma can originate from the skin or the pigmented layers of the eye (the uvea). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505377
Concept ID:
CN002586
Finding
10.

Lymphoma

A cancer originating in lymphocytes and presenting as a solid tumor of lymhpoid cells. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505322
Concept ID:
CN002422
Finding
11.

Malignant tumor of testis

Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) affect 1 in 500 men and are the most common cancer in males aged 15 to 40 in western European populations. The incidence of TGCT rose dramatically during the 20th century. Known risk factors for TGCT include a history of undescended testis (UDT), testicular dysgenesis, infertility, previously diagnosed TGCT, and a family history of the disease. Brothers of men with TGCT have an 8- to 10-fold risk of developing TGCT, whereas the relative risk to fathers and sons is 4-fold. This familial relative risk is much higher than that for most other types of cancer (summary by Rapley et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors A locus for testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT1; 300228) has been identified on chromosome Xq27. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
56313
Concept ID:
C0153594
Neoplastic Process
12.

Malignant tumor of urinary bladder

Bladder cancer is a disease in which certain cells in the bladder become abnormal and multiply without control or order. The bladder is a hollow, muscular organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine until it is ready to be excreted from the body. The most common type of bladder cancer begins in cells lining the inside of the bladder and is called transitional cell carcinoma (TCC).Bladder cancer may cause blood in the urine, pain during urination, frequent urination, or the feeling that one needs to urinate without results. These signs and symptoms are not specific to bladder cancer, however. They also can be caused by noncancerous conditions such as infections. [from GHR]

MedGen UID:
14150
Concept ID:
C0005684
Neoplastic Process
13.

Bladder neoplasm

new abnormal urinary bladder tissue that grows by excessive cellular division and proliferation more rapidly than normal and continues to grow after the stimuli that initiated the new growth cease. [from CRISP]

MedGen UID:
594
Concept ID:
C0005695
Neoplastic Process
14.

Genetic predisposition

A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
137259
Concept ID:
C0314657
Organism Attribute
15.

Disorder of ovary

The ovaries are a pair of organs that women have. They are located in the pelvis, one on each side of the uterus. Each ovary is about the size and shape of an almond. The ovaries produce a woman's eggs. If an egg is fertilized by a sperm, a pregnancy can result. Ovaries also make the female hormones estrogen and progesterone. When a woman goes through menopause, her ovaries stop releasing eggs and make far lower levels of hormones. Problems with the ovaries include. -Ovarian cancer. -Ovarian cysts and polycystic ovary syndrome. -Premature ovarian failure. -Ovarian torsion, a twisting of the ovary.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
45256
Concept ID:
C0029928
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
17.

Prostatic Neoplasms

A benign, borderline, or malignant neoplasm that affects the prostate gland. Representative examples include benign prostate phyllodes tumor, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, prostate carcinoma, and prostate sarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18697
Concept ID:
C0033578
Neoplastic Process
18.

Neoplasm of the respiratory system

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the respiratory system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
11200
Concept ID:
C0035244
Neoplastic Process
19.

Neoplasm of lung

Tumor of the lung. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
7400
Concept ID:
C0024121
Neoplastic Process
20.

Disorder of lung

When you breathe, your lungs take in oxygen from the air and deliver it to the bloodstream. The cells in your body need oxygen to work and grow. During a normal day, you breathe nearly 25,000 times. People with lung disease have difficulty breathing. Millions of people in the U.S. have lung disease. If all types of lung disease are lumped together, it is the number three killer in the United States. The term lung disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer, and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure. Dept. of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
7399
Concept ID:
C0024115
Disease or Syndrome
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