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1.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HSP) is a multi-system disorder characterized by oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis and, in some cases, neutropenia, pulmonary fibrosis, or granulomatous colitis. HPS comprises eight known disorders (HPS-1 to HPS-8), the majority of which present with the same clinical phenotype to varying degrees of severity. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
831224
Concept ID:
CN205955
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 4

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
483344
Concept ID:
C3484357
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 7

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
481386
Concept ID:
C3279756
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 3

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
448213
Concept ID:
CN068829
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 8

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
433287
Concept ID:
CN068492
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 5

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
432881
Concept ID:
CN068618
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 6

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
432880
Concept ID:
CN068617
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome 1

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
419514
Concept ID:
C2931875
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) is a multisystem disorder characterized by: tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism; a bleeding diathesis resulting from a platelet storage pool deficiency; and, in some cases, pulmonary fibrosis, granulomatous colitis, or immunodeficiency. The albinism is characterized by: hypopigmentation of the skin and hair; and ocular findings of reduced iris pigment with iris transillumination, reduced retinal pigment, foveal hypoplasia with significant reduction in visual acuity (usually in the range of 20/50 to 20/400), nystagmus, and increased crossing of the optic nerve fibers. Hair color ranges from white to brown; skin color ranges from white to olive and is usually a shade lighter than that of other family members. The bleeding diathesis can result in easy bruising, frequent epistaxis, gingival bleeding, postpartum hemorrhage, colonic bleeding, and prolonged bleeding with menses or after tooth extraction, circumcision, and other surgeries. Pulmonary fibrosis, a restrictive lung disease, typically causes symptoms in the early thirties and can progress to death within a decade. Granulomatous colitis is severe in about 15% of affected individuals. Neutropenia and/or immune defects are associated primarily with HPS-2. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
36313
Concept ID:
C0079504
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
10.

Hypopigmentation of the skin

A reduction of skin color related to a decrease in melanin production and deposition. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
102477
Concept ID:
C0162835
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Hypopigmentation of the skin

A reduction of skin color related to a decrease in melanin production and deposition. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
446388
Concept ID:
CN000946
Finding
12.

Dilution, pigmentary

MedGen UID:
406294
Concept ID:
C1876214
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Prolonged bleeding time

Prolongation of the time taken for a standardized skin cut of fixed depth and length to stop bleeding. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
56231
Concept ID:
C0151529
Finding
14.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Blood Coagulation Disorders, Inherited

Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of inherited abnormalities in blood coagulation. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
163105
Concept ID:
C0852077
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Metabolic disease

Metabolism is the process your body uses to get or make energy from the food you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system break the food parts down into sugars and acids, your body's fuel. Your body can use this fuel right away, or it can store the energy in your body tissues, such as your liver, muscles, and body fat. A metabolic disorder occurs when abnormal chemical reactions in your body disrupt this process. When this happens, you might have too much of some substances or too little of other ones that you need to stay healthy. . You can develop a metabolic disorder when some organs, such as your liver or pancreas, become diseased or do not function normally. Diabetes is an example. .  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
44376
Concept ID:
C0025517
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Hereditary eye diseases

Transmission of gene defects or chromosomal aberrations/abnormalities which are expressed in extreme variation in the structure or function of the eye. These may be evident at birth, but may be manifested later with progression of the disorder. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
41933
Concept ID:
C0015398
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Oculocutaneous albinism

Oculocutaneous albinism is a group of conditions that affect coloring (pigmentation) of the skin, hair, and eyes. Affected individuals typically have very fair skin and white or light-colored hair. Long-term sun exposure greatly increases the risk of skin damage and skin cancers, including an aggressive form of skin cancer called melanoma, in people with this condition. Oculocutaneous albinism also reduces pigmentation of the colored part of the eye (the iris) and the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina). People with this condition usually have vision problems such as reduced sharpness; rapid, involuntary eye movements (nystagmus); and increased sensitivity to light (photophobia).Researchers have identified multiple types of oculocutaneous albinism, which are distinguished by their specific skin, hair, and eye color changes and by their genetic cause. Oculocutaneous albinism type 1 is characterized by white hair, very pale skin, and light-colored irises. Type 2 is typically less severe than type 1; the skin is usually a creamy white color and hair may be light yellow, blond, or light brown. Type 3 includes a form of albinism called rufous oculocutaneous albinism, which usually affects dark-skinned people. Affected individuals have reddish-brown skin, ginger or red hair, and hazel or brown irises. Type 3 is often associated with milder vision abnormalities than the other forms of oculocutaneous albinism. Type 4 has signs and symptoms similar to those seen with type 2.Several additional types of this disorder have been proposed, each affecting one or a few families.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
36250
Concept ID:
C0078918
Congenital Abnormality
19.

Platelet storage pool disease

Disorder characterized by a decrease or lack of platelet dense bodies in which the releasable pool of adenine nucleotides and 5HT are normally stored. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19351
Concept ID:
C0032197
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Abnormality of blood and blood-forming tissues

Your blood is living tissue made up of liquid and solids. The liquid part, called plasma, is made of water, salts and protein. Over half of your blood is plasma. The solid part of your blood contains red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. Blood disorders affect one or more parts of the blood and prevent your blood from doing its job. They can be acute or chronic. Many blood disorders are inherited. Other causes include other diseases, side effects of medicines, and a lack of certain nutrients in your diet. Types of blood disorders include. -Platelet disorders, excessive clotting, and bleeding problems, which affect how your blood clots. -Anemia, which happens when your blood does not carry enough oxygen to the rest of your body. -Cancers of the blood, such as leukemia and myeloma. -Eosinophilic disorders, which are problems with one type of white blood cell.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5483
Concept ID:
C0018939
Disease or Syndrome
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