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Results: 1 to 20 of 35

1.

Genomic Instability

An increased tendency of the GENOME to acquire MUTATIONS when various processes involved in maintaining and replicating the genome are dysfunctional. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
182518
Concept ID:
C0919532
Cell or Molecular Dysfunction
2.

Instability

MedGen UID:
731956
Concept ID:
C1444783
Finding
3.

BIDS brittle hair-impaired intellect-decreased fertility-short stature syndrome

Trichothiodystrophy, which is commonly called TTD, is a rare inherited condition that affects many parts of the body. The hallmark of this condition is brittle hair that is sparse and easily broken. Tests show that the hair is lacking sulfur, an element that normally gives hair its strength. The signs and symptoms of trichothiodystrophy vary widely. Mild cases may involve only the hair. More severe cases also cause delayed development, significant intellectual disability, and recurrent infections; severely affected individuals may survive only into infancy or early childhood. Mothers of children with trichothiodystrophy may experience problems during pregnancy including pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (preeclampsia) and a related condition called HELLP syndrome that can damage the liver. Babies with trichothiodystrophy are at increased risk of premature birth, low birth weight, and slow growth. Most affected children have short stature compared to others their age. Intellectual disability and delayed development are common, although most affected individuals are highly social with an outgoing and engaging personality. Some have brain abnormalities that can be seen with imaging tests. Trichothiodystrophy is also associated with recurrent infections, particularly respiratory infections, which can be life-threatening. Other features of trichothiodystrophy can include dry, scaly skin (ichthyosis); abnormalities of the fingernails and toenails; clouding of the lens in both eyes from birth (congenital cataracts); poor coordination; and skeletal abnormalities. About half of all people with trichothiodystrophy have a photosensitive form of the disorder, which causes them to be extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) rays from sunlight. They develop a severe sunburn after spending just a few minutes in the sun. However, for reasons that are unclear, they do not develop other sun-related problems such as excessive freckling of the skin or an increased risk of skin cancer. Many people with trichothiodystrophy report that they do not sweat.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
149256
Concept ID:
C0740342
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Xeroderma

A non-neoplastic disorder characterized by abnormally dry skin. Causes include vitamin A deficiency, sunlight exposure, medications, metabolic disorders, autoimmune disorders, and hereditary genetic disorders. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
53106
Concept ID:
C0043345
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Cockayne syndrome

Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or “moderate” form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome (COFS) or Pena-Shokeir syndrome type II; CS type III, a milder form; Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS). CS type I (moderate CS) is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II (severe CS or early-onset CS) is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age seven years. CS type III (mild CS or late-onset CS) is characterized by essentially normal growth and cognitive development or by late onset. Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, including intellectual disability, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS dysmyelination and calcifications. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
40363
Concept ID:
C0009207
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Xeroderma pigmentosum

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals, and marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age 2 years in most affected individuals); Ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); and Greatly increased risk of cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
21943
Concept ID:
C0043346
Congenital Abnormality
7.

Werner syndrome

Werner syndrome is characterized by the premature appearance of features associated with normal aging and cancer predisposition. Individuals with Werner syndrome develop normally until the end of the first decade. The first sign is the lack of a growth spurt during the early teen years. Early findings (usually observed in the 20s) include loss and graying of hair, hoarseness, and scleroderma-like skin changes, followed by bilateral ocular cataracts, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypogonadism, skin ulcers, and osteoporosis in the 30s. Myocardial infarction and cancer are the most common causes of death; the mean age of death in individuals with Werner syndrome is 54 years. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
12147
Concept ID:
C0043119
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Rothmund-Thomson syndrome

Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is characterized by poikiloderma; sparse hair, eyelashes, and/or eyebrows; small stature; skeletal and dental abnormalities; cataracts; and an increased risk for cancer, especially osteosarcoma. The skin is typically normal at birth; the rash of RTS develops between age three and six months as erythema, swelling, and blistering on the face and subsequently spreads to the buttocks and extremities. The rash evolves over months to years into the chronic pattern of reticulated hypo- and hyperpigmentation, punctate atrophy, and telangiectases, collectively known as poikiloderma. Hyperkeratotic lesions occur in approximately one third of individuals. Skeletal abnormalities include dysplasias, absent or malformed bones (such as absent radii), osteopenia, and delayed bone formation. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10819
Concept ID:
C0032339
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Bloom syndrome

Bloom’s syndrome (BSyn) is characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth deficiency, highly characteristic sparseness of subcutaneous fat tissue throughout infancy and early childhood, and short stature throughout postnatal life that in most affected individuals is accompanied by an erythematous and sun-sensitive skin lesion of the face. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is common and very possibly responsible for infections of the upper respiratory tract, the middle ear, and the lung that occur repeatedly in most persons with BSyn. Although most affected individuals have normal intellectual ability, many exhibit a poorly defined (and little studied) learning disability. Women may be fertile, but menopause occurs unusually early; men are infertile. Serious medical complications that are much more common than in the general population and that also appear at unusually early ages are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus resembling the adult-onset type, and cancer of a wide variety of types and anatomic sites. BSyn is very rare in all national and ethnic groups but is relatively less rare in Ashkenazi Jews. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2685
Concept ID:
C0005859
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B

Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group B (XPB) is an extremely rare subtype of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP; see this term), a rare photodermatosis predisposing to skin cancers. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
799752
Concept ID:
CN202607
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D

Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group D (XPD) is a subtype of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP; see this term), a rare photodermatosis predisposing to skin cancers. [from ORDO]

MedGen UID:
799362
Concept ID:
CN202609
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449889

14.

Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group b

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals, and marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age 2 years in most affected individuals); Ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); and Greatly increased risk of cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
373493
Concept ID:
C1970808
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Trichothiodystrophy Syndromes

A rare, autosomal recessive inherited syndrome characterized by brittle hair, mental and physical retardation, and decreased fertility. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
363064
Concept ID:
C1955934
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Xeroderma pigmentosum, group B

MedGen UID:
78643
Concept ID:
C0268136
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Xeroderma pigmentosum, group D

Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals, and marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age 2 years in most affected individuals); Ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); and Greatly increased risk of cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
75656
Concept ID:
C0268138
Disease or Syndrome
18.

DNA Repair-Deficiency Disorders

Disorders resulting from defective DNA REPAIR processes or the associated cellular responses to DNA DAMAGE. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
327583
Concept ID:
C1563696
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Skin and Connective Tissue Diseases

A collective term for diseases of the skin and its appendages and of connective tissue. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
59786
Concept ID:
C0175166
Disease or Syndrome

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