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Items: 6

1.

Hypertension

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is called diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers. Usually the systolic number comes before or above the diastolic number. A reading of. -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is called prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits such as exercise and the DASH diet and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
3.

Pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension is defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure greater than 25 mm Hg during rest (normal level, 10 mm Hg) or greater than 30 mm Hg during exercise (normal level, 15 mm Hg), as determined with right heart catheterization. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505097
Concept ID:
CN001893
Finding
4.

Primary pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by widespread obstruction and obliteration of the smallest pulmonary arteries. When a sufficient number of vessels are occluded, the resistance to blood flow through the lungs increases, and the right ventricle attempts to compensate by generating higher pressure to maintain pulmonary blood flow. When the right ventricle can no longer compensate for the increased resistance, progressive heart failure ensues. Initial symptoms include dyspnea (60%), fatigue (19%), syncope (8%), chest pain (7%), palpitations (5%), and leg edema (3%). All ages are affected, but the mean age at diagnosis is 36 years. Mean survival after diagnosis is 2.8 years; current therapy does improve clinical function but has modest effect on survival. The term heritable PAH (HPAH) includes familial PAH (PAH that occurs in two or more family members) and simplex PAH (i.e., a single occurrence in a family) when a pathogenic variant has been identified. Most heritable PAH (75%) is caused by a pathogenic variant in BMPR2; pathogenic variants in other genes (i.e., ACVRL1, KCNK3, CAV1, SMAD9, BMPR1B,) are considerably less common (1-3%). HPAH has identical symptoms, signs, and histology as PAH of unknown cause. The time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis may be shorter in individuals with familial PAH, possibly because of familial awareness of the disease. Three retrospective studies suggest that persons with PAH who have a BMPR2 pathogenic variant exhibit more severe disease. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
57749
Concept ID:
C0152171
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood vessels that carry blood from your heart to your lungs become hard and narrow. Your heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and cannot do its job and you can develop heart failure. . Symptoms of PH include. -Shortness of breath during routine activity, such as climbing two flights of stairs. -Tiredness. -Chest pain. -A racing heartbeat. -Pain on the upper right side of the abdomen. -Decreased appetite. As PH worsens, you may find it hard to do any physical activities. There are two main kinds of PH. One runs in families or appears for no known reason. The other kind is related to another condition, usually heart or lung disease. . There is no cure for PH. Treatments can control symptoms. They involve treating the heart or lung disease, medicines, oxygen, and sometimes lung transplantation. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9376
Concept ID:
C0020542
Finding; Pathologic Function
6.

Smith McCort dysplasia

Smith-McCort dysplasia is a rare autosomal recessive osteochondrodysplasia characterized by short limbs and trunk with barrel-shaped chest. The radiographic phenotype includes platyspondyly, generalized abnormalities of the epiphyses and metaphyses, and a distinctive lacy appearance of the iliac crest, features identical to those of Dyggve-Melchior-Clausen disease. Spinal cord compression due to atlantoaxial instability occurs in both SMC and DMC (Spranger et al., 1976; Nakamura et al., 1997). Genetic Heterogeneity of Smith-McCort Dysplasia Smith-McCort dysplasia-2 (SMC2; 615222) is caused by mutation in the RAB33B gene (605950) on chromosome 4q31. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
375887
Concept ID:
C1846431
Disease or Syndrome
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