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Results: 1 to 20 of 32

1.

Shock

Shock happens when your blood pressure is too low and not enough blood and oxygen can get to your organs and tissues. Causes of shock include internal or external bleeding, dehydration, burns, or severe vomiting and/or diarrhea. All of these involve the loss of large amounts of body fluids. Shock often accompanies injury. Specific types of shock include: -Hypovolemic shock, caused by internal or external bleeding. -Septic shock, caused by infections in the bloodstream. -Anaphylactic shock, caused by a severe allergic reaction. -Cardiogenic shock, caused by the inability of the heart to pump blood effectively. -Neurogenic shock, caused by damage to the nervous system. Symptoms of shock include cold and sweaty skin, weak but rapid pulse, irregular breathing, dry mouth, dilated pupils and reduced urine flow. Shock is life threatening and it is important to get help right away. Treatment of shock depends on the cause. National Institute of General Medical Sciences.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20738
Concept ID:
C0036974
Pathologic Function
2.

Ischemia

a decrease in blood supply caused by blockage of blood vessel [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
5899
Concept ID:
C0022116
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Cerebral ischemia

Diminished or absent blood supply to the brain caused by obstruction (thrombosis or embolism) of an artery resulting in neurologic damage. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
182975
Concept ID:
C0917798
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Cerebrovascular accident

A stroke is a medical emergency. Strokes happen when blood flow to your brain stops. Within minutes, brain cells begin to die. There are two kinds of stroke. The more common kind, called ischemic stroke, is caused by a blood clot that blocks or plugs a blood vessel in the brain. The other kind, called hemorrhagic stroke, is caused by a blood vessel that breaks and bleeds into the brain. Mini-strokes or transient ischemic attacks (TIAs), occur when the blood supply to the brain is briefly interrupted. Symptoms of stroke are . -Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg (especially on one side of the body). -Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding speech. -Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes. -Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination. -Sudden severe headache with no known cause. If you have any of these symptoms, you must get to a hospital quickly to begin treatment. Acute stroke therapies try to stop a stroke while it is happening by quickly dissolving the blood clot or by stopping the bleeding. Post-stroke rehabilitation helps individuals overcome disabilities that result from stroke damage. Drug therapy with blood thinners is the most common treatment for stroke. . NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
52522
Concept ID:
C0038454
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Oxygen

An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
45267
Concept ID:
C0030054
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Glucose

A hexose with an aldehyde group; in which each of the 5 remaining carbons other than the aldehyde group has one hydroxyl group in the R,S,R, and R configuration counting from the first hydroxyl containing carbon next to the aldehyde in the straight chain (Fisher) projection; otherwise all carbons have exclusively hydrogens. Occurs mostly as pyran (6-membered oxygen containing ring or oxane) and rarely as furan (5-membered oxygen containing ring) or straight chain. When glucose forms a ring an additional ""anomeric"" asymmetric carbon is created which is denoted as ""alpha"" or ""beta"". For isomers see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glucose. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
42238
Concept ID:
C0017725
Pharmacologic Substance
7.

Hydrogen Peroxide

A strong oxidizing agent used in aqueous solution as a ripening agent, bleach, and topical anti-infective. It is relatively unstable and solutions deteriorate over time unless stabilized by the addition of acetanilide or similar organic materials. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9340
Concept ID:
C0020281
Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means low blood glucose, or blood sugar. Your body needs glucose to have enough energy. After you eat, your blood absorbs glucose. If you eat more sugar than your body needs, your muscles, and liver store the extra. When your blood sugar begins to fall, a hormone tells your liver to release glucose. In most people, this raises blood sugar. If it doesn't, you have hypoglycemia, and your blood sugar can be dangerously low. Signs include : -Hunger. -Shakiness. -Dizziness. -Confusion. -Difficulty speaking. -Feeling anxious or weak. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia is often a side effect of diabetes medicines. Eating or drinking something with carbohydrates can help. If it happens often, your health care provider may need to change your treatment plan. You can also have low blood sugar without having diabetes. Causes include certain medicines or diseases, hormone or enzyme deficiencies, and tumors. Laboratory tests can help find the cause. The kind of treatment depends on why you have low blood sugar. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6979
Concept ID:
C0020615
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Blood glucose decreased

Abnormally low blood sugar. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
777034
Concept ID:
C0595883
Finding
10.

Cerebral ischemia

MedGen UID:
505309
Concept ID:
CN002398
Finding
11.

Hypoglycemia

A decreased concentration of glucose in the blood. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505016
Concept ID:
CN001757
Finding
12.

Stroke

MedGen UID:
340407
Concept ID:
C1849743
Finding
13.

Normal growth

MedGen UID:
154370
Concept ID:
C0578019
Finding
14.

Severity

The degree of something undesirable e.g. pain or weather; also, strictness. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
141003
Concept ID:
C0439793
15.

Stress

Everyone feels stressed from time to time. Not all stress is bad. All animals have a stress response, and it can be life-saving. But chronic stress can cause both physical and mental harm. There are at least three different types of stress:: -Routine stress related to the pressures of work, family, and other daily responsibilities. -Stress brought about by a sudden negative change, such as losing a job, divorce, or illness. -Traumatic stress, which happens when you are in danger of being seriously hurt or killed. Examples include a major accident, war, assault, or a natural disaster. This type of stress can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different people may feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, and irritability. People under chronic stress get more frequent and severe viral infections, such as the flu or common cold. Vaccines, such as the flu shot, are less effective for them. Some people cope with stress more effectively than others. It's important to know your limits when it comes to stress, so you can avoid more serious health effects. NIH: National Institute of Mental Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
20971
Concept ID:
C0038435
Finding
16.

Infarct

tissue death caused by blocked blood circulation [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
9461
Concept ID:
C0021308
Pathologic Function
17.

Hypoxia of brain

A reduction in brain oxygen supply due to ANOXEMIA (a reduced amount of oxygen being carried in the blood by HEMOGLOBIN), or to a restriction of the blood supply to the brain, or both. Severe hypoxia is referred to as anoxia, and is a relatively common cause of injury to the central nervous system. Prolonged brain anoxia may lead to BRAIN DEATH or a PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE. Histologically, this condition is characterized by neuronal loss which is most prominent in the HIPPOCAMPUS; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; CEREBELLUM; and inferior olives. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
287140
Concept ID:
C1527348
Pathologic Function
18.

Anoxia of brain

MedGen UID:
242383
Concept ID:
C0995195
Pathologic Function
19.

Disorder of glucose metabolism

Pathological conditions in which the BLOOD GLUCOSE cannot be maintained within the normal range, such as in HYPOGLYCEMIA and HYPERGLYCEMIA. Etiology of these disorders varies. Plasma glucose concentration is critical to survival for it is the predominant fuel for the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
226229
Concept ID:
C1257958
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Superoxol

MedGen UID:
195886
Concept ID:
C0699404
Pharmacologic Substance

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