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Results: 1 to 20 of 61

1.

Behavioral abnormality

An abnormality of mental functioning including various affective, behavioural, cognitive and perceptual abnormalities. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
425007
Concept ID:
CN000665
Finding
2.

Norepinephrine

A naturally occurring catecholamine hormone that functions as a neurotransmitter in the sympathetic nervous system. Norepinephrine directly stimulates adrenergic receptors. Stimulation of alpha-adrenergic receptors causes vasoconstriction of the radial smooth muscle of the iris, arteries, arterioles, veins, urinary bladder, and the sphincter of the gastrointestinal tract. Stimulation of beta-1 adrenergic receptors causes an increase in myocardial contractility, heart rate, automaticity, and atrioventricular (AV) conduction while stimulation of beta-2 adrenergic receptors causes bronchiolar and vascular smooth muscle dilatation. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
45125
Concept ID:
C0028351
Pharmacologic Substance
3.

Drug abuse

Drug abuse is a serious public health problem that affects almost every community and family in some way. Each year drug abuse causes millions of serious illnesses or injuries among Americans. Abused drugs include: -Amphetamines. -Anabolic steroids. -Club drugs. -Cocaine. -Heroin. -Inhalants. -Marijuana. -Prescription drugs. Drug abuse also plays a role in many major social problems, such as drugged driving, violence, stress, and child abuse. Drug abuse can lead to homelessness, crime, and missed work or problems with keeping a job. It harms unborn babies and destroys families. There are different types of treatment for drug abuse. But the best is to prevent drug abuse in the first place. . NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41659
Concept ID:
C0013146
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
4.

Dopamine

A monoamine compound with positive inotropic activity. Dopamine is a naturally occurring catecholamine formed by decarboxylation of dehydroxyphenylalanine and a precursor of norepinephrine and epinephrine. Dopamine binds to alpha-1 and beta-1 adrenergic receptors. Mediated through myocardial beta-1 adrenergic receptors, dopamine increase heart rate and force, thereby increasing cardiac output. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptor stimulation on vascular smooth muscle, leads to vasoconstriction and results in an increase in systemic vascular resistance. Stimulation of dopaminergic receptors in renal vasculature, leads to renal blood vessel dilation, and an increase in glomerular filtration rate, renal blood flow, sodium excretion, and urine output. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
41644
Concept ID:
C0013030
Pharmacologic Substance
5.

Heroin

Heroin is a white or brown powder or a black, sticky goo. It's made from morphine, a natural substance in the seedpod of the Asian poppy plant. It can be mixed with water and injected with a needle. Heroin can also be smoked or snorted up the nose. All of these ways of taking heroin send it to the brain very quickly. This makes it very addictive. Major health problems from heroin include miscarriages, heart infections, and death from overdose. People who inject the drug also risk getting infectious diseases, including HIV/AIDS and hepatitis. Regular use of heroin can lead to tolerance. This means users need more and more drug to have the same effect. At higher doses over time, the body becomes dependent on heroin. If dependent users stop heroin, they have withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms include restlessness, muscle and bone pain, diarrhea and vomiting, and cold flashes with goose bumps. . NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
41524
Concept ID:
C0011892
Pharmacologic Substance
6.

Obesity

Obesity means having too much body fat. It is different from being overweight, which means weighing too much. The weight may come from muscle, bone, fat, and/or body water. Both terms mean that a person's weight is greater than what's considered healthy for his or her height. . Obesity occurs over time when you eat more calories than you use. The balance between calories-in and calories-out differs for each person. Factors that might affect your weight include your genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and not being physically active. . Being obese increases your risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, and some cancers. If you are obese, losing even 5 to 10 percent of your weight can delay or prevent some of these diseases. For example, that means losing 10 to 20 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
18127
Concept ID:
C0028754
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Nicotine

A plant alkaloid, found in the tobacco plant, and addictive central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that causes either ganglionic stimulation in low doses or ganglionic blockage in high doses. Nicotine acts as an agonist at the nicotinic cholinergic receptors in the autonomic ganglia, at neuromuscular junctions, and in the adrenal medulla and the brain. Nicotine's CNS-stimulating activities may be mediated through the release of several neurotransmitters, including acetylcholine, beta-endorphin, dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and ACTH. As a result, peripheral vasoconstriction, tachycardia, and elevated blood pressure may be observed with nicotine intake. This agent may also stimulate the chemoreceptor trigger zone, thereby inducing nausea and vomiting. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
18039
Concept ID:
C0028040
Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Syndrome

A set of symptoms or conditions that occur together and suggest the presence of a certain disease or an increased chance of developing the disease. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
11688
Concept ID:
C0039082
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Cocaine

Cocaine is a white powder. It can be snorted up the nose or mixed with water and injected with a needle. Cocaine can also be made into small white rocks, called crack. Crack is smoked in a small glass pipe. Cocaine speeds up your whole body. You may feel full of energy, happy, and excited. But then your mood can change. You can become angry, nervous, and afraid that someone's out to get you. You might do things that make no sense. After the high of the cocaine wears off, you can crash and feel tired and sad for days. You also get a strong craving to take the drug again to try to feel better. No matter how cocaine is taken, it is dangerous. Some of the most common serious problems include heart attack and stroke. You are also at risk for HIV/AIDS and hepatitis, from sharing needles or having unsafe sex. Cocaine is more dangerous when combined with other drugs or alcohol. It is easy to lose control over cocaine use and become addicted. Then, even if you get treatment, it can be hard to stay off the drug. People who stopped using cocaine can still feel strong cravings for the drug, sometimes even years later. NIH: National Institute on Drug Abuse.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
3135
Concept ID:
C0009170
Pharmacologic Substance
10.

Alcoholic Intoxication, Chronic

For most adults, moderate alcohol use is probably not harmful. However, about 18 million adult Americans are alcoholics or have alcohol problems. Alcoholism is a disease with four main features:: - Craving - a strong need to drink. - Loss of control - not being able to stop drinking once you've started. - Physical dependence - withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, sweating, or shakiness when you don't drink. - Tolerance - the need to drink greater amounts of alcohol to feel the same effect. Alcoholism carries many serious dangers. Heavy drinking can increase the risk of certain cancers. It can cause damage to the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcoholism also increases the risk of death from car crashes, injuries, homicide, and suicide. If you want to stop drinking, there is help. Start by talking to your health care provider. Medicines, counseling, and support groups may help you to stop drinking. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
1801
Concept ID:
C0001973
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
11.

Victim of abuse finding

Indication of abuse victim.  [from HL7]

MedGen UID:
646740
Concept ID:
C0562381
Finding
12.

Error occurred: cannot get document summary

ID:
449670

13.

Alcohol dependence

MedGen UID:
426875
Concept ID:
CN028882
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Obesity

MedGen UID:
368429
Concept ID:
C1963185
Finding
15.

Acyl-CoA thioester hydrolase, long-chain, 1

MedGen UID:
351308
Concept ID:
C1865144
16.

PROGRESSIVE ENCEPHALOMYELITIS WITH RIGIDITY

MedGen UID:
349287
Concept ID:
C1861457
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Opiate agonist

A substance used to treat moderate to severe pain. Opioids are like opiates, such as morphine and codeine, but are not made from opium. Opioids bind to opioid receptors in the central nervous system. An opioid is a type of alkaloid. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
66892
Concept ID:
C0242402
Pharmacologic Substance
18.

Marihuana

Any part of, or extract from, the female hemp plant Cannabis sativa. Marijuana contains cannabinoids, substances with hallucinogenic, psychoactive, and addictive properties. This agent has potential use for treating cancer pain and cachexia. (NCI04) [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
44288
Concept ID:
C0024808
Pharmacologic Substance
19.

Compulsive gambling

Many people enjoy gambling, whether it's betting on a horse or playing poker on the Internet. Most people who gamble don't have a problem, but some lose control of their gambling. Signs of problem gambling include : - Always thinking about gambling. - Lying about gambling. - Spending work or family time gambling . - Feeling bad after you gamble, but not quitting . - Gambling with money you need for other things. If you have concerns about your gambling, ask for help. Your health care provider can work with you to find the treatment that's best for you. NIH: Natonal Institutes of Health.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
14632
Concept ID:
C0030662
Mental or Behavioral Dysfunction
20.

Alcohol

A class of compounds where a hydroxyl (OH) group is attached to single bonded hydrocarbons. Alcohols are classified according to the position of the carbon atom with the attached hydroxyl group (i.e. primary alcohols are alcohols with the OH group attached to the primary carbon atom, C1). Uses include solvents, astringents, and anti-infective activity. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
1400
Concept ID:
C0001975
Pharmacologic Substance

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