Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 1 to 20 of 46

1.

Late-onset retinal degeneration

Late-onset retinal degeneration (LORD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by onset in the fifth to sixth decade with night blindness and punctate yellow-white deposits in the retinal fundus, progressing to severe central and peripheral degeneration, with choroidal neovascularization and chorioretinal atrophy (Hayward et al., 2003). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
344198
Concept ID:
C1854065
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Degeneration of retina

A retrogressive pathological change in the retina, focal or generalized, caused by genetic defects, inflammation, trauma, vascular disease, or aging. Degeneration affecting predominantly the macula lutea of the retina is MACULAR DEGENERATION. (Newell, Ophthalmology: Principles and Concepts, 7th ed, p304) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
48432
Concept ID:
C0035304
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Photoreceptor degeneration

MedGen UID:
745042
Concept ID:
C1998028
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Retinal degeneration

A deterioration of the retina. This nonspecific term is retained here because of its wide use in the literature, but if possible new annotations should indicate the precise type of retinal abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504488
Concept ID:
CN000512
Finding
5.

Late onset

A type of `adult onset` with onset of symptoms after the age of 60 years. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
427965
Concept ID:
CN003237
Finding
6.

Onset

The start, beginning, or early stages. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
87142
Concept ID:
C0332162
7.

Retinaldehyde

A carotenoid constituent of visual pigments. It is the oxidized form of retinol which functions as the active component of the visual cycle. It is bound to the protein opsin forming the complex rhodopsin. When stimulated by visible light, the retinal component of the rhodopsin complex undergoes isomerization at the 11-position of the double bond to the cis-form; this is reversed in "dark" reactions to return to the native trans-configuration. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19764
Concept ID:
C0035331
Pharmacologic Substance
8.

Tissue Degeneration

MedGen UID:
3705
Concept ID:
C0011164
Pathologic Function
9.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time. Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected. Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and slowly progressive vision loss. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other. The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
116576
Concept ID:
C0242383
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Scotoma

A localized defect in the visual field bordered by an area of normal vision. This occurs with a variety of EYE DISEASES (e.g., RETINAL DISEASES and GLAUCOMA); OPTIC NERVE DISEASES, and other conditions. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
19902
Concept ID:
C0036454
Finding
11.

Degenerative disorder of macula

deterioration of the eye part called macula lutea of the retina [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
7434
Concept ID:
C0024437
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma

MedGen UID:
698687
Concept ID:
C1275421
Congenital Abnormality
13.

Dystrophy

a degenerative disorder [from CHV]

MedGen UID:
569248
Concept ID:
C0333606
Pathologic Function
14.

Age-related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a medical condition which usually affects older adults and results in a loss of vision in the center of the visual field (the macula) because of damage to the retina. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506135
Concept ID:
CN006909
Finding
15.

Scotoma

Scotoma refers to an area or island of loss or impairment of visual acuity surrounded by a field of normal or relatively well-preserved vision. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504504
Concept ID:
CN000540
Finding
16.

Visual loss

Loss of visual acuity (implying that vision was better at a certain timepoint in live - otherwise the term is impaired vision or a subclass of that). [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504502
Concept ID:
CN000537
Finding
17.

Age-related macular degeneration 10

Age-related macular degeneration is an eye disease that is a leading cause of vision loss in older people in developed countries. The vision loss usually becomes noticeable in a person's sixties or seventies and tends to worsen over time. Age-related macular degeneration mainly affects central vision, which is needed for detailed tasks such as reading, driving, and recognizing faces. The vision loss in this condition results from a gradual deterioration of light-sensing cells in the tissue at the back of the eye that detects light and color (the retina). Specifically, age-related macular degeneration affects a small area near the center of the retina, called the macula, which is responsible for central vision. Side (peripheral) vision and night vision are generally not affected. Researchers have described two major types of age-related macular degeneration, known as the dry form and the wet form. The dry form is much more common, accounting for 85 to 90 percent of all cases of age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by a buildup of yellowish deposits called drusen beneath the retina and slowly progressive vision loss. The condition typically affects vision in both eyes, although vision loss often occurs in one eye before the other. The wet form of age-related macular degeneration is associated with severe vision loss that can worsen rapidly. This form of the condition is characterized by the growth of abnormal, fragile blood vessels underneath the macula. These vessels leak blood and fluid, which damages the macula and makes central vision appear blurry and distorted.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
409758
Concept ID:
C1969108
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Staining (finding)

MedGen UID:
352872
Concept ID:
C1704680
Finding
19.

Sorsby fundus dystrophy

MedGen UID:
338164
Concept ID:
C1850938
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Macular degeneration

MedGen UID:
336506
Concept ID:
C1849131
Finding

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...