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Items: 18

1.

Parkinson disease, late-onset

Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
463618
Concept ID:
C3160718
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Parkinson disease

Parkinsonism refers to all clinical states characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, slowed movement (bradykinesia) and often postural instability. Parkinson disease is the primary and most common form of parkinsonism. Psychiatric manifestations, which include depression and visual hallucinations, are common but not uniformly present. Dementia eventually occurs in at least 20% of cases. The most common sporadic form of Parkinson disease manifests around age 60; however, young-onset and even juvenile presentations are seen. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
10590
Concept ID:
C0030567
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Hyperreflexia

Hyperreflexia is the presence of hyperactive stretch reflexes of the muscles. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
57738
Concept ID:
C0151889
Finding
4.

Dyskinesia

Abnormal involuntary movements which primarily affect the extremities, trunk, or jaw that occur as a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of dyskinesia as a primary manifestation of disease may be referred to as dyskinesia syndromes (see MOVEMENT DISORDERS). Dyskinesias are also a relatively common manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
8514
Concept ID:
C0013384
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Dystonia

Dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive movements and/or postures. Dystonic movements are typically patterned and twisting, and may be associated with tremor. Dystonia is often initiated or worsened by voluntary action and associated with overflow muscle activation. Dystonia can be classified clinically according to age of onset, body distribution, temporal pattern, and associated features (i.e., isolated dystonia – in which it is the only motor feature except tremor; combined dystonia – in which another movement disorder is present; or complex dystonia – in which other neurologic or systemic manifestations are present). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
3940
Concept ID:
C0013421
Sign or Symptom
6.

Dyskinesia

A movement disorder which consists of effects including diminished voluntary movements and the presence of involuntary movements. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
506509
Concept ID:
CN117552
Finding
7.

Dystonia

An abnormally increased muscular tone that causes fixed abnormal postures. There is a slow, intermittent twisting motion that leads to exaggerated turning and posture of the extremities and trunk. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504804
Concept ID:
CN001220
Finding
8.

Juvenile onset

MedGen UID:
461003
Concept ID:
C3149653
Finding
9.

Juvenile-onset dystonia

MedGen UID:
339494
Concept ID:
C1846331
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Tardive dyskinesia

Tardive dyskinesia is a debilitating motor disorder manifest as hyperkinetic, involuntary, repetitive movements predominantly of the orofacial region. It is a complication of treatment with so-called typical antipsychotic or neuroleptic agents, such as chlorpromazine or haloperidol, and is estimated to occur in 20 to 30% of chronic schizophrenics on long-term treatment (Thelma et al., 2008). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
151939
Concept ID:
C0686347
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Parkinsonism

Characteristic neurologic anomaly resulting form degeneration of dopamine-generating cells in the substantia nigra, a region of the midbrain, characterized clinically by shaking, rigidity, slowness of movement and difficulty with walking and gait. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
66079
Concept ID:
C0242422
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Abnormality of the basal ganglia

Abnormality of the basal ganglia. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
14035
Concept ID:
C0004782
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Movement disorder

Imagine if parts of your body moved when you didn't want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia is abnormal uncontrolled movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. . Nerve diseases cause many movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease. Other causes include injuries, autoimmune diseases, infections and certain medicines. Many movement disorders are inherited, which means they run in families. Treatment varies by disorder. Medicine can cure some disorders. Others get better when an underlying disease is treated. Often, however, there is no cure. In that case, the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms and relieve pain.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
10113
Concept ID:
C0026650
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of the central nervous system

A structural abnormality of the central nervous system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
3306
Concept ID:
C0007682
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Dystonia 21

Dystonia-21 (DYT21) is an autosomal dominant form of pure torsion dystonia, a movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements and abnormal postures (summary by Norgren et al., 2011). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
482866
Concept ID:
C3281236
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia 2

Familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia is a disorder of the nervous system that causes periods of involuntary movement. Paroxysmal indicates that the abnormal movements come and go over time. Nonkinesigenic means that episodes are not triggered by sudden movement. Dyskinesia broadly refers to involuntary movement of the body.People with familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia experience episodes of abnormal movement that develop without a known cause or are brought on by alcohol, caffeine, stress, fatigue, menses, or excitement. Episodes are not induced by exercise or sudden movement and do not occur during sleep. An episode is characterized by irregular, jerking or shaking movements that range from mild to severe. In this disorder, the dyskinesias can include slow, prolonged contraction of muscles (dystonia); small, fast, "dance-like" motions (chorea); writhing movements of the limbs (athetosis); and, rarely, flailing movements of the limbs (ballismus). Dyskinesias also affect muscles in the trunk and face. The type of abnormal movement varies among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. Individuals with familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia do not lose consciousness during an episode. Most people do not experience any other neurological symptoms between episodes.Individuals with familial paroxysmal nonkinesigenic dyskinesia usually begin to show signs and symptoms of the disorder during childhood or their early teens. Episodes typically last 1-4 hours, and the frequency of episodes ranges from several per day to one per year. In some affected individuals, episodes occur less often with age.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
370188
Concept ID:
C1970149
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Dystonia 7, torsion

Idiopathic torsion dystonia (ITD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of movement disorders characterized by sustained dystonic muscle contractions causing involuntary twisting movements and/or postures, where causes such as cerebral lesions (especially of the basal ganglia), drugs, or other neurologic disorders have not been found. Adult-onset torsion dystonia usually remains focal and is localized in the upper part of the body (summary by Leube et al., 1996). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
355560
Concept ID:
C1865818
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Dystonia 13

MedGen UID:
335918
Concept ID:
C1843264
Disease or Syndrome
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