Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information

Results: 14

1.

Murine

MedGen UID:
108834
Concept ID:
C0591833
Pharmacologic Substance
2.

Pressure

MedGen UID:
632176
Concept ID:
C0460139
Finding
3.

Dilated cardiomyopathy

Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is defined by the presence of left ventricular dilatation and left ventricular systolic dysfunction in the absence of abnormal loading conditions (hypertension, valve disease) or coronary artery disease sufficient to cause global systolic impairment. Right ventricular dilation and dysfunction may be present but are not necessary for the diagnosis. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504887
Concept ID:
CN001497
Finding
4.

Cardiomyopathy

A myocardial disorder in which the heart muscle is structurally and functionally abnormal, in the absence of coronary artery disease, hypertension, valvular disease and congenital heart disease sufficient to cause the observed myocardial abnormality. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504883
Concept ID:
CN001491
Finding
5.

Cardiomyopathy

Cardiomyopathy is the name for diseases of the heart muscle. These diseases enlarge your heart muscle or make it thicker and more rigid than normal. In rare cases, scar tissue replaces the muscle tissue. Some people live long, healthy lives with cardiomyopathy. Some people don't even realize they have it. In others, however, it can make the heart less able to pump blood through the body. This can cause serious complications, including: - Heart failure . - Abnormal heart rhythms . - Heart valve problems. - Sudden cardiac arrest. Heart attacks, high blood pressure, infections, and other diseases can all cause cardiomyopathy. Some types of cardiomyopathy run in families. In many people, however, the cause is unknown. Treatment might involve medicines, surgery, other medical procedures, and lifestyle changes. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
209232
Concept ID:
C0878544
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy

Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) is characterized by progressive fibrofatty replacement of the myocardium that predisposes to ventricular tachycardia and sudden death in young individuals and athletes. It primarily affects the right ventricle; with time, it may also involve the left ventricle. The presentation of disease is highly variable even within families, and some affected individuals may not meet established clinical criteria. The mean age at diagnosis is 31 years (±13; range: 4-64 years). [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
87618
Concept ID:
C0349788
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Primary dilated cardiomyopathy

Nonsyndromic isolated dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by left ventricular enlargement and systolic dysfunction, a reduction in the myocardial force of contraction. DCM usually presents with any one of the following: Heart failure with symptoms of congestion (edema, orthopnea, paroxysmal dyspnea) and/or reduced cardiac output (fatigue, dyspnea on exertion). Arrhythmias and/or conduction system disease. Thromboembolic disease (from left ventricular mural thrombus) including stroke . [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
2880
Concept ID:
C0007193
Disease or Syndrome
8.

Enzyme activation

Conversion of an inactive form of an enzyme to one possessing metabolic activity. It includes 1, activation by ions (activators); 2, activation by cofactors (coenzymes); and 3, conversion of an enzyme precursor (proenzyme or zymogen) to an active enzyme. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
41819
Concept ID:
C0014429
Molecular Function
9.

Myocardial Diseases, Secondary

MedGen UID:
19916
Concept ID:
C0036529
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Primary cardiomyopathy

Disease of the heart muscle associated with electrical or mechanical dysfunction, in which the heart is the sole or predominantly involved organ. [from SNOMEDCT_US]

MedGen UID:
18634
Concept ID:
C0033141
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Imidazole

MedGen UID:
7016
Concept ID:
C0020923
Pharmacologic Substance
12.

Imidazoles

Compounds containing 1,3-diazole, a five membered aromatic ring containing two nitrogen atoms separated by one of the carbons. Chemically reduced ones include IMIDAZOLINES and IMIDAZOLIDINES. Distinguish from 1,2-diazole (PYRAZOLES). [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
5743
Concept ID:
C0020924
Pharmacologic Substance
13.

Heart disease

If you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. It is also a major cause of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is narrowing or blockage of the coronary arteries, the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease and happens slowly over time. It's the major reason people have heart attacks. Other kinds of heart problems may happen to the valves in the heart, or the heart may not pump well and cause heart failure. Some people are born with heart disease. You can help reduce your risk of heart disease by taking steps to control factors that put you at greater risk:: - Control your blood pressure. - Lower your cholesterol. - Don't smoke. - Get enough exercise. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
5458
Concept ID:
C0018799
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Disorder of cardiovascular system

A non-neoplastic or neoplastic disorder affecting the heart or the vessels (arteries, veins and lymph vessels). Representative examples of non-neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocarditis and hypertension. Representative examples of neoplastic cardiovascular disorders are endocardial myxoma and angiosarcoma. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
2848
Concept ID:
C0007222
Disease or Syndrome

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...