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Items: 20

1.

Glomerulonephritis

Inflammation of the renal glomeruli. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
6616
Concept ID:
C0017658
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Glomerulonephritis

Inflammation of the renal glomeruli. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504340
Concept ID:
CN000099
Finding
3.

Membranous nephropathy

A type of glomerulonephropathy characterized by thickening of the basement membrane and deposition of immune complexes in the subepithelial space. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
42231
Concept ID:
C0017665
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Nephritis

The presence of inflammation affecting the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
14328
Concept ID:
C0027697
Disease or Syndrome
5.

progressive

MedGen UID:
851455
Concept ID:
CN232553
Finding
6.

Minimal change glomerulonephritis

The presence of minimal changes visible by light microscopy but flattened and fused podocyte foot processes on electron microscopy in a person with nephrotic range proteinuria. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
776414
Concept ID:
CN183848
Finding
7.

Nephritis

The presence of inflammation affecting the kidney. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504350
Concept ID:
CN000119
Finding
8.

Glomerulosclerosis

Accumulation of scar tissue within the glomerulus. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
504338
Concept ID:
CN000096
Finding
9.

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

MedGen UID:
449387
Concept ID:
CN043606
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis

MedGen UID:
376918
Concept ID:
C1850973
Finding
11.

Glomerulonephritis, Minimal Change

A glomerular disorder characterized by the electron microscopic finding of loss of podocyte foot processes. Light microscopic examination does not show glomerular changes. Patients present with proteinuria and nephrotic syndrome. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
316453
Concept ID:
C1704320
Disease or Syndrome
12.

FG syndrome

The phenotypic spectrum of MED12-related disorders, which is still being defined, includes at a minimum the phenotypes of FG syndrome type 1 (FGS1) and Lujan syndrome (LS). FGS1 and LS share the clinical findings of cognitive impairment, hypotonia, and abnormalities of the corpus callosum. FGS1 is further characterized by absolute or relative macrocephaly, tall forehead, downslanted palpebral fissures, small and simple ears, constipation and/or anal anomalies, broad thumbs and halluces, and characteristic behavior. LS is further characterized by large head, tall thin body habitus, long thin face, high nasal root, high narrow palate, and short philtrum. Carrier females in families with FGS1 and LS are typically unaffected. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
113106
Concept ID:
C0220769
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
13.

Glomerulosclerosis

Accumulation of scar tissue within the glomerulus. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
61248
Concept ID:
C0178664
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Minimal change disease

A kidney disease with no or minimal histological glomerular changes on light microscopy and with no immune deposits. It is characterized by lipid accumulation in the epithelial cells of KIDNEY TUBULES and in the URINE. Patients usually show NEPHROTIC SYNDROME indicating the presence of PROTEINURIA with accompanying EDEMA. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
10307
Concept ID:
C0027721
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 1

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic finding in several renal disorders that manifest clinically as proteinuria and progressive decline in renal function. Some patients with FSGS develop the clinical entity called 'nephrotic syndrome' (see NPHS1; 256300), which includes massive proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, hyperlipidemia, and edema. However, patients with FSGS may have proteinuria in the nephrotic range without other features of the nephrotic syndrome (summary by D'Agati et al., 2004; Mathis et al., 1998). D'Agati et al. (2011) provided a detailed review of FSGS, emphasizing that the disorder results from defects of the podocyte. Because of confusion in the literature regarding use of the terms 'nephrotic syndrome' and 'focal segmental glomerulosclerosis' (see NOMENCLATURE section), these disorders in OMIM are classified as NPHS or FSGS according to how they were first designated in the literature. Genetic Heterogeneity of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis and Nephrotic Syndrome Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome are genetically heterogeneous disorders representing a spectrum of hereditary renal diseases. See also FSGS2 (603965), caused by mutation in the TRPC6 gene (603652); FSGS3 (607832), associated with variation in the CD2AP gene (604241); FSGS4 (612551), mapped to chromosome 22q12; FSGS5 (613237), caused by mutation in the INF2 gene (610982); FSGS6 (614131), caused by mutation in the MYO1E gene (601479); FSGS7 (616002), caused by mutation in the PAX2 gene (167409); FSGS8 (616032), caused by mutation in the ANLN gene (616027); and FSGS9 (616220), caused by mutation in the CRB2 gene (609720). See also NPHS1 (256300), caused by mutation in the NPHS1 gene (602716); NPHS2 (600995), caused by mutation in the podocin gene (604766); NPHS3 (610725), caused by mutation in the PLCE1 gene (608414); and NPHS4 (256370), caused by mutation in the WT1 gene (607102). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
4904
Concept ID:
C0017668
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Nephropathy

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter blood. They remove waste products and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom. . Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include:. -Cancer. -Cysts. -Stones. -Infections. Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail completely, a kidney transplant or dialysis can replace the work your kidneys normally do. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9635
Concept ID:
C0022658
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis

Chronic glomerulonephritis characterized histologically by proliferation of MESANGIAL CELLS, increase in the MESANGIAL EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX, and a thickening of the glomerular capillary walls. This may appear as a primary disorder or secondary to other diseases including infections and autoimmune disease SYSTEMIC LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS. Various subtypes are classified by their abnormal ultrastructures and immune deposits. Hypocomplementemia is a characteristic feature of all types of MPGN. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
9033
Concept ID:
C0017662
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Autoimmune disease

Your body's immune system protects you from disease and infection. But if you have an autoimmune disease, your immune system attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Autoimmune diseases can affect many parts of the body. No one is sure what causes autoimmune diseases. They do tend to run in families. Women - particularly African-American, Hispanic-American, and Native-American women - have a higher risk for some autoimmune diseases. There are more than 80 types of autoimmune diseases, and some have similar symptoms. This makes it hard for your health care provider to know if you really have one of these diseases, and if so, which one. Getting a diagnosis can be frustrating and stressful. Often, the first symptoms are fatigue, muscle aches and a low fever. The classic sign of an autoimmune disease is inflammation, which can cause redness, heat, pain and swelling. The diseases may also have flare-ups, when they get worse, and remissions, when symptoms get better or disappear. Treatment depends on the disease, but in most cases one important goal is to reduce inflammation. Sometimes doctors prescribe corticosteroids or other drugs that reduce your immune response.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
2135
Concept ID:
C0004364
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis 2

Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is a pathologic entity associated clinically with proteinuria, the nephrotic syndrome (NPHS), and progressive loss of renal function. It is a common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (review by Meyrier, 2005). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and nephrotic syndrome (NPHS), see FSGS1 (603278). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
349053
Concept ID:
C1858915
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis, type II

Dense deposit disease (DDD)/membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis type II (MPGNII) is characterized by onset of hematuria and/or proteinuria, acute nephritic syndrome, or nephrotic syndrome. It most frequently affects children between ages five and 15 years. Spontaneous remissions are uncommon and about 50% of affected individuals develop end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within ten years of diagnosis. DDD/MPGNII can be associated with acquired partial lipodystrophy (APL). Drusen, whitish-yellow deposits within Bruch's membrane of the retina often develop in the second decade of life; they initially have little impact on vision, but cause vision problems from subretinal neovascular membranes, macular detachment, and central serous retinopathy in about 10% of affected individuals. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
124345
Concept ID:
C0268743
Disease or Syndrome
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