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Items: 15

1.

Renal cell carcinoma

MedGen UID:
775811
Concept ID:
CN182935
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Renal cell carcinoma

A type of carcinoma of the kidney with origin in the epithelium of the proximal convoluted renal tubule. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505836
Concept ID:
CN004944
Finding
3.

Stage 5 chronic kidney disease

A degree of kidney failure severe enough to require dialysis or kidney transplantation for survival characterized by a severe reduction in glomerular filtration rate (less than 15 ml/min/1.73 m2) and other manifestations including increased serum creatinine. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505594
Concept ID:
CN003407
Finding
4.

Chronic kidney disease stage 5

Long-standing and persistent renal disease with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) less than 15 ml/min. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
384526
Concept ID:
C2316810
Disease or Syndrome; Finding
5.

Renal cell carcinoma, papillary, 1

Hereditary papillary renal cell carcinoma is characterized by the development of multiple, bilateral papillary renal tumors (Zbar et al., 1995). The transmission pattern is consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance. Papillary renal cell carcinoma is histologically and genetically distinct from 2 other forms of inherited renal carcinoma, von Hippel Lindau disease (193300), caused by mutation in the VHL gene (608537) on chromosome 3, and a form associated with the chromosome translocation t(3;8), as described by Cohen et al. (1979). Bodmer et al. (2002) reviewed the molecular genetics of familial and nonfamilial cases of renal cell carcinoma, including the roles of VHL, MET, and translocations involving chromosomes 1, 3, and X. For background information and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of nonpapillary renal cell carcinoma, see RCC (144700). See also a hereditary syndrome of predisposition to uterine leiomyomas and papillary renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC; 150800) caused by germline mutation in the FH gene (136850). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
766
Concept ID:
C0007134
Neoplastic Process
6.

Trisomy

The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
21702
Concept ID:
C0041107
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Neoplasm

A general term for autonomous tissue growth in which the malignancy status has not been established and for which the transformed cell type has not been specifically identified. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
10294
Concept ID:
C0027651
Neoplastic Process
8.

Neoplasms

MedGen UID:
880980
Concept ID:
CN236628
Disease or Syndrome
9.

Trisomy 17 mosaicism

A chromosomal abnormality consisting of the presence of a third copy of chromosome 17 in somatic cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
202107
Concept ID:
C1096168
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Inborn genetic diseases

Diseases that are caused by genetic mutations present during embryo or fetal development, although they may be observed later in life. The mutations may be inherited from a parent's genome or they may be acquired in utero. [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
181981
Concept ID:
C0950123
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Genitourinary neoplasm

A tumor (abnormal growth of tissue) of the genitourinary system. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
22583
Concept ID:
C0042065
Neoplastic Process
12.

Nephropathy

Your kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of your fists. They are located near the middle of your back, just below the rib cage. Inside each kidney about a million tiny structures called nephrons filter blood. They remove waste products and extra water, which become urine. The urine flows through tubes called ureters to your bladder, which stores the urine until you go to the bathroom. . Most kidney diseases attack the nephrons. This damage may leave kidneys unable to remove wastes. Causes can include genetic problems, injuries, or medicines. You are at greater risk for kidney disease if you have diabetes, high blood pressure, or a close family member with kidney disease. Chronic kidney disease damages the nephrons slowly over several years. Other kidney problems include:. -Cancer. -Cysts. -Stones. -Infections. Your doctor can run tests to find out if you have kidney disease. If your kidneys fail completely, a kidney transplant or dialysis can replace the work your kidneys normally do. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9635
Concept ID:
C0022658
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Congenital chromosomal disease

Clinical conditions caused by an abnormal chromosome constitution in which there is extra or missing chromosome material (either a whole chromosome or a chromosome segment). (from Thompson et al., Genetics in Medicine, 5th ed, p429) [from MeSH]

MedGen UID:
3441
Concept ID:
C0008626
Congenital Abnormality; Disease or Syndrome
14.

Adenocarcinoma

A malignant neoplasm arising from glandular cells. [from NCI]

MedGen UID:
122
Concept ID:
C0001418
Neoplastic Process
15.

Chromosome 17, duplication

MedGen UID:
435016
Concept ID:
CN072189
Disease or Syndrome
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