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Results: 3

1.

Carcinoma of pancreas

Pancreatic cancer shows among the highest mortality rates of any cancer, with a 5-year relative survival rate of less than 5%. By the time of initial diagnosis, metastatic disease is commonly present. Established risk factors include a family history of pancreatic cancer, a medical history of diabetes type 2, and cigarette smoking (summary by Amundadottir et al., 2009). Genetic Heterogeneity of Pancreatic Cancer Somatic mutations in pancreatic cancer occur in the KRAS (190070), CDKN2A (600160), MADH4 (600993), TP53 (191170), ARMET (601916), STK11 (602216), ACVR1B (601300), and RBBP8 (604124) genes. Susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer include PNCA1 (606856), related to mutation in the PALLD gene on chromosome 4q32 (608092); PNCA2 (613347), related to mutation in the BRCA2 gene on chromosome 13q12 (600185); PNCA3 (613348), related to mutation in the PALB2 gene on chromosome 16p12 (610355); and PNCA4 (614320), related to mutation in the BRCA1 gene on chromosome 17q21 (113705). Occurrence of Pancreatic Cancer in Other Disorders Several familial cancer syndromes increase the risk of pancreatic cancer. The best characterized include hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer syndrome (HNPCC; see 120435); hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome due to mutations in BRCA2; Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (175200); the melanoma-pancreatic cancer syndrome (606719), caused by mutations in CDKN2A (600160); von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (193300), ataxia-telangiectasia (208900) (Swift et al., 1976), and juvenile polyposis syndrome (174900). Patients with hereditary pancreatitis (167800) resulting from gain-of-function mutations in the protease serine-1 gene (PRSS1; 276000) have a lifetime pancreatic cancer risk ratio of 57 and a cumulative incidence, to age 70 years, of 40% (Lowenfels et al., 1997). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
65917
Concept ID:
C0235974
Neoplastic Process
2.

Malignant tumor of testis

Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) affect 1 in 500 men and are the most common cancer in males aged 15 to 40 in western European populations. The incidence of TGCT rose dramatically during the 20th century. Known risk factors for TGCT include a history of undescended testis (UDT), testicular dysgenesis, infertility, previously diagnosed TGCT, and a family history of the disease. Brothers of men with TGCT have an 8- to 10-fold risk of developing TGCT, whereas the relative risk to fathers and sons is 4-fold. This familial relative risk is much higher than that for most other types of cancer (summary by Rapley et al., 2000). Genetic Heterogeneity of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors A locus for testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT1; 300228) has been identified on chromosome Xq27. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
56313
Concept ID:
C0153594
Neoplastic Process
3.

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome

Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an autosomal-dominant condition characterized by the association of gastrointestinal polyposis, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and cancer predisposition. Peutz-Jeghers-type hamartomatous polyps are most common in the small intestine (in order of prevalence: in the jejunum, ileum, and duodenum) but can also occur in the stomach, large bowel, and extraintestinal sites including the renal pelvis, bronchus, gall bladder, nasal passages, urinary bladder, and ureters. Gastrointestinal polyps can result in chronic bleeding and anemia and also cause recurrent obstruction and intussusception requiring repeated laparotomy and bowel resection. Mucocutaneous hyperpigmentation presents in childhood as dark blue to dark brown macules around the mouth, eyes, and nostrils, in the perianal area, and on the buccal mucosa. Hyperpigmented macules on the fingers are common. The macules may fade in puberty and adulthood. Individuals with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome are at increased risk for a wide variety of epithelial malignancies (colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, breast, and ovarian cancers). Females are at risk for sex cord tumors with annular tubules (SCTAT), a benign neoplasm of the ovaries, and adenoma malignum of the cervix, a rare aggressive cancer. Males occasionally develop large calcifying Sertoli cell tumors (LCST) of the testes, which secrete estrogen and can lead to gynecomastia, advanced skeletal age, and ultimately short stature, if untreated. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
18404
Concept ID:
C0031269
Disease or Syndrome

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