Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Results: 1 to 20 of 23

1.

Immunodeficiency 15

Immunodeficiency-15 (IMD15) is an autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by onset in infancy of life-threatening bacterial, fungal, and viral infections and failure to thrive. Laboratory studies show hypo- or agammaglobulinemia with relatively normal numbers of B and T cells. However, functional studies show impaired differentiation and activation of immune cells (summary by Pannicke et al., 2013). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
775831
Concept ID:
CN183073
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Common variable immunodeficiency 9

Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome type III is an autosomal recessive disorder of immune dysregulation. The phenotype is variable, but most patients have significant lymphadenopathy associated with variable autoimmune manifestations. Some patients may have recurrent infections. Lymphocyte accumulation results from a combination of impaired apoptosis and excessive proliferation (summary by Oliveira, 2013). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ALPS, see 601859. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
760236
Concept ID:
CN182401
Disease or Syndrome
3.

Fanconi-Bickel syndrome

Fanconi-Bickel syndrome is a rare but well-defined clinical entity, inherited in an autosomal recessive mode and characterized by hepatorenal glycogen accumulation, proximal renal tubular dysfunction, and impaired utilization of glucose and galactose (Manz et al., 1987). Because no underlying enzymatic defect in carbohydrate metabolism had been identified and because metabolism of both glucose and galactose is impaired, a primary defect of monosaccharide transport across the membranes had been suggested (Berry et al., 1995; Fellers et al., 1967; Manz et al., 1987; Odievre, 1966). Use of the term glycogenosis type XI introduced by Hug (1987) is to be discouraged because glycogen accumulation is not due to the proposed functional defect of phosphoglucomutase, an essential enzyme in the common degradative pathways of both glycogen and galactose, but is secondary to nonfunctional glucose transport. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
501176
Concept ID:
C3495427
Disease or Syndrome
4.

Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia 3

AOA3 is an autosomal recessive progressive neurologic disorder with onset in the second decade of life (Al Tassan et al., 2012). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of ataxia-oculomotor apraxia, see AOA1 (208920). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
490012
Concept ID:
CN169372
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Serum level of adiponectin 1

MedGen UID:
382622
Concept ID:
C2675517
Disease or Syndrome
6.

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus

Nonsyndromic permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) is characterized by the onset of hyperglycemia within the first six months of life (mean age: 7 weeks; range: birth to 26 weeks) that does not resolve over time. Clinical manifestations at the time of diagnosis include intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), hyperglycemia, glycosuria, osmotic polyuria, severe dehydration, and failure to thrive. Therapy with insulin corrects the hyperglycemia and allows for catch-up growth. The course of PNDM varies by genotype. Pancreatic agenesis/hypoplasia caused by homozygous mutations in PDX1 results in severe insulin deficiency and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
371484
Concept ID:
C1833104
Disease or Syndrome
7.

Susceptibility to malaria

Malaria, a major cause of child mortality worldwide, is caused by mosquito-borne hematoprotozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Of the 4 species that infect humans, P. falciparum causes the most severe forms of malaria and is the major cause of death and disease. Although less fatal, P. malariae, P. ovale, and, in particular, P. vivax infections are major causes of morbidity. The parasite cycle involves a first stage in liver cells and a subsequent stage at erythrocytes, when malaria symptoms occur. A wide spectrum of phenotypes are observed, from asymptomatic infection to mild disease, including fever and mild anemia, to severe disease, including cerebral malaria, profound anemia, and respiratory distress. Genetic factors influence the response to infection, as well as disease progression and severity. Malaria is the strongest known selective pressure in the recent history of the human genome, and it is the evolutionary driving force behind sickle-cell disease (603903), thalassemia (see 141800), glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency (300908), and other erythrocyte defects that together constitute the most common mendelian diseases of humans (Kwiatkowski, 2005; Campino et al., 2006). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
370149
Concept ID:
C1970028
Finding
8.

Asthma, susceptibility to

Bronchial asthma is the most common chronic disease affecting children and young adults. It is a complex genetic disorder with a heterogeneous phenotype, largely attributed to the interactions among many genes and between these genes and the environment. Asthma-related traits include clinical symptoms of asthma, such as coughing, wheezing, and dyspnea; bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) as assessed by methacholine challenge test; serum IgE levels; atopy; and atopic dermatitis (Laitinen et al., 2001; Illig and Wjst, 2002; Pillai et al., 2006). See 147050 for information on the asthma-associated phenotype atopy. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
358271
Concept ID:
C1869116
Finding
9.

Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia familial 5

Congenital hyperinsulinism is a condition that causes individuals to have abnormally high levels of insulin, which is a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels. People with this condition have frequent episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). In infants and young children, these episodes are characterized by a lack of energy (lethargy), irritability, or difficulty feeding. Repeated episodes of low blood sugar increase the risk for serious complications such as breathing difficulties, seizures, intellectual disability, vision loss, brain damage, and coma. The severity of congenital hyperinsulinism varies widely among affected individuals, even among members of the same family. About 60 percent of infants with this condition experience a hypoglycemic episode within the first month of life. Other affected children develop hypoglycemia by early childhood. Unlike typical episodes of hypoglycemia, which occur most often after periods without food (fasting) or after exercising, episodes of hypoglycemia in people with congenital hyperinsulinism can also occur after eating.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
355335
Concept ID:
C1864952
Disease or Syndrome
10.

Transient neonatal diabetes mellitus 3

MedGen UID:
351177
Concept ID:
C1864623
Disease or Syndrome
11.

Pancreatic agenesis, congenital

Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus is a type of diabetes that first appears within the first 6 months of life and persists throughout the lifespan. This form of diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) resulting from a shortage of the hormone insulin. Insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells for conversion to energy. Individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus experience slow growth before birth (intrauterine growth retardation). Affected infants have hyperglycemia and an excessive loss of fluids (dehydration) and are unable to gain weight and grow at the expected rate (failure to thrive). In some cases, people with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus also have certain neurological problems, including developmental delay and recurrent seizures (epilepsy). This combination of developmental delay, epilepsy, and neonatal diabetes is called DEND syndrome. Intermediate DEND syndrome is a similar combination but with milder developmental delay and without epilepsy. A small number of individuals with permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus have an underdeveloped pancreas. Because the pancreas produces digestive enzymes as well as secreting insulin and other hormones, affected individuals experience digestive problems such as fatty stools and an inability to absorb fat-soluble vitamins.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
340466
Concept ID:
C1850096
Disease or Syndrome
12.

Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1

Familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) falls within the category of migraine with aura. In migraine with aura (including familial hemiplegic migraine) the neurologic symptoms of aura are unequivocally localizable to the cerebral cortex or brain stem and include visual disturbance (most common), sensory loss (e.g., numbness or paresthesias of the face or an extremity), and dysphasia (difficulty with speech); FHM must include motor involvement, i.e., hemiparesis (weakness of an extremity). Hemiparesis occurs with at least one other symptom during FHM aura. Neurologic deficits with FHM attacks can be prolonged for hours to days and may outlast the associated migrainous headache. FHM is often earlier in onset than typical migraine, frequently beginning in the first or second decade; the frequency of attacks tends to decrease with age. Approximately 40%-50% of families with FHM1 have cerebellar signs ranging from nystagmus to progressive, usually late-onset mild ataxia. Cerebral infarction and death have rarely been associated with hemiplegic migraine. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
331389
Concept ID:
C1832894
Disease or Syndrome
13.

Maturity-onset diabetes of the young, type 4

MedGen UID:
318863
Concept ID:
C1833382
Disease or Syndrome
14.

Episodic ataxia type 2

Episodic ataxia type 2 (EA2) is characterized by paroxysmal attacks of ataxia, vertigo, and nausea typically lasting minutes to days in duration. Attacks can be associated with dysarthria, diplopia, tinnitus, dystonia, hemiplegia, and headache. About 50% of individuals with EA2 have migraine headaches. Onset is typically in childhood or early adolescence (age range 2-32 years). Frequency of attacks can range from once or twice a year to three or four times a week. Attacks can be triggered by stress, exertion, caffeine, alcohol, fever, heat, and phenytoin and can be stopped or decreased in frequency and severity by administration of acetazolamide. Between attacks, individuals may initially be asymptomatic but eventually develop interictal findings that can include nystagmus and ataxia. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
314039
Concept ID:
C1720416
Disease or Syndrome
15.

Spinocerebellar ataxia 6

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is characterized by adult-onset, slowly progressive cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria, and nystagmus. Mean age of onset is 43 to 52 years. Initial symptoms are gait unsteadiness, stumbling, and imbalance (in ~90%) and dysarthria (in ~10%). Eventually all persons have gait ataxia, upper-limb incoordination, intention tremor, and dysarthria. Dysphagia and choking are common. Visual disturbances may result from diplopia, difficulty fixating on moving objects, horizontal gaze-evoked nystagmus, and vertical nystagmus. Hyperreflexia and extensor plantar responses occur in up to 40%-50%. Basal ganglia signs, including dystonia and blepharospasm, occur in up to 25%. Mentation is generally preserved. [from GeneReviews]

MedGen UID:
148458
Concept ID:
C0752124
Disease or Syndrome
16.

Deficiency of glycerol kinase

Francke et al. (1987) noted that there are 3 clinically distinct forms of glycerol kinase deficiency: infantile, juvenile, and adult. The infantile form is associated with severe developmental delay, and those with the adult form have no symptoms and are often detected fortuitously. The infantile form of GK deficiency, or the 'GK complex,' results from the Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome (300679) with congenital adrenal hypoplasia (300200) and/or Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD; 310200), whereas the juvenile and adult forms have isolated GK deficiency (Walker et al., 1996). [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
82803
Concept ID:
C0268418
Disease or Syndrome
17.

Leprechaunism syndrome

Donohue syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by severe insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's tissues and organs do not respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin normally helps regulate blood sugar levels by controlling how much sugar (in the form of glucose) is passed from the bloodstream into cells to be used as energy. Severe insulin resistance leads to problems with regulating blood sugar levels and affects the development and function of organs and tissues throughout the body. Severe insulin resistance underlies the varied signs and symptoms of Donohue syndrome. Individuals with Donohue syndrome are unusually small starting before birth, and affected infants experience failure to thrive, which means they do not grow and gain weight at the expected rate. Additional features that become apparent soon after birth include a lack of fatty tissue under the skin (subcutaneous fat); wasting (atrophy) of muscles; excessive body hair growth (hirsutism); multiple cysts on the ovaries in females; and enlargement of the nipples, genitalia, kidneys, heart, and other organs. Most affected individuals also have a skin condition called acanthosis nigricans, in which the skin in body folds and creases becomes thick, dark, and velvety. Distinctive facial features in people with Donohue syndrome include bulging eyes, thick lips, upturned nostrils, and low-set ears. Affected individuals develop recurrent, life-threatening infections beginning in infancy. Donohue syndrome is one of a group of related conditions described as inherited severe insulin resistance syndromes. These disorders, which also include Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome and type A insulin resistance syndrome, are considered part of a spectrum. Donohue syndrome represents the most severe end of the spectrum; children with this condition do not survive beyond age 2.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
82708
Concept ID:
C0265344
Disease or Syndrome
18.

Pineal hyperplasia AND diabetes mellitus syndrome

Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by severe insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's tissues and organs do not respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin normally helps regulate blood sugar levels by controlling how much sugar (in the form of glucose) is passed from the bloodstream into cells to be used as energy. In people with Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, insulin resistance impairs blood sugar regulation and ultimately leads to a condition called diabetes mellitus, in which blood sugar levels can become dangerously high. Severe insulin resistance in people with Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome affects the development of many parts of the body. Affected individuals are unusually small starting before birth, and infants experience failure to thrive, which means they do not grow and gain weight at the expected rate. Additional features of the condition that become apparent early in life include a lack of fatty tissue under the skin (subcutaneous fat); wasting (atrophy) of muscles; dental abnormalities; excessive body hair growth (hirsutism); multiple cysts on the ovaries in females; and enlargement of the nipples, genitalia, kidneys, heart, and other organs. Most affected individuals also have a skin condition called acanthosis nigricans, in which the skin in body folds and creases becomes thick, dark, and velvety. Distinctive facial features in people with Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome include prominent, widely spaced eyes; a broad nose; and large, low-set ears. Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome is one of a group of related conditions described as inherited severe insulin resistance syndromes. These disorders, which also include Donohue syndrome and type A insulin resistance syndrome, are considered part of a spectrum. Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome is intermediate in severity between Donohue syndrome (which is fatal before age 2) and type A insulin resistance syndrome (which is often not diagnosed until adolescence). People with Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome develop signs and symptoms early in life and live into their teens or twenties. Death usually results from complications related to diabetes mellitus, such as a toxic buildup of acids called ketones in the body (diabetic ketoacidosis).
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
78783
Concept ID:
C0271695
Disease or Syndrome
19.

Insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus AND acanthosis nigricans

Type A insulin resistance syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by severe insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's tissues and organs do not respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin normally helps regulate blood sugar levels by controlling how much sugar (in the form of glucose) is passed from the bloodstream into cells to be used as energy. In people with type A insulin resistance syndrome, insulin resistance impairs blood sugar regulation and ultimately leads to a condition called diabetes mellitus, in which blood sugar levels can become dangerously high. Severe insulin resistance also underlies the other signs and symptoms of type A insulin resistance syndrome. In affected females, the major features of the condition become apparent in adolescence. Many affected females do not begin menstruation by age 16 (primary amenorrhea) or their periods may be light and irregular (oligomenorrhea). They develop cysts on the ovaries and excessive body hair growth (hirsutism). Most affected females also develop a skin condition called acanthosis nigricans, in which the skin in body folds and creases becomes thick, dark, and velvety. Unlike most people with insulin resistance, females with type A insulin resistance syndrome are usually not overweight. The features of type A insulin resistance syndrome are more subtle in affected males. Some males have low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) as the only sign; others may also have acanthosis nigricans. In many cases, males with this condition come to medical attention only when they develop diabetes mellitus in adulthood. Type A insulin resistance syndrome is one of a group of related conditions described as inherited severe insulin resistance syndromes. These disorders, which also include Donohue syndrome and Rabson-Mendenhall syndrome, are considered part of a spectrum. Type A insulin resistance syndrome represents the mildest end of the spectrum: its features often do not become apparent until puberty or later, and it is generally not life-threatening.
[from GHR]

MedGen UID:
78782
Concept ID:
C0271690
Disease or Syndrome
20.

Migraine

Migraine is the most common type of chronic, episodic headache, as summarized by Featherstone (1985). One locus for migraine with or without aura (MGR1) has been identified on chromosome 4q24. Other loci for migraine have been identified on 6p21.1-p12.2 (MGR3; 607498), 14q21.2-q22.3 (MGR4; 607501), 19p13 (MGR5; 607508), 1q31 (MGR6; 607516), 15q11-q13 (MGR7; 609179), 5q21 (with or without aura, MGR8, 609570; with aura, MGR9, 609670), 17p13 (MGR10; 610208), 18q12 (MGR11; 610209), 10q22-q23 (MGR12; 611706), and the X chromosome (MGR2; 300125). Mutation in the KCNK18 gene (613655) on chromosome 10q25 causes migraine with aura (MGR13; 613656). A subtype of autosomal dominant migraine with aura (MA), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM; see 141500), is caused by mutation in the CACNA1A gene (601011) on chromosome 19p13 (FHM1; 141500), by mutation in the ATP1A2 gene (182340) on chromosome 1q21 (FHM2; 602481), or by mutation in the SCN1A gene (182389) on chromosome 2q24 (FHM3; 609634). Another locus for FHM has been mapped to chromosome 1q31 (FHM4; see 607516). There is evidence that a polymorphism in the estrogen receptor gene (ESR1; 133430.0005) and a polymorphism in the TNF gene (191160.0004) may confer susceptibility to migraine. A polymorphism in the endothelin receptor type A gene (EDNRA; 131243.0001) may confer resistance to migraine. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
57451
Concept ID:
C0149931
Disease or Syndrome

Display Settings:

Format
Items per page

Send to:

Choose Destination

Supplemental Content

Find related data

Recent activity

Your browsing activity is empty.

Activity recording is turned off.

Turn recording back on

See more...