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Fanconi anemia, complementation group P(FANCP)

MedGen UID:
Concept ID:
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: FANCP; SLX4-Related Fanconi Anemia
Gene (location): SLX4 (16p13.3)
OMIM®: 613951

Disease characteristics

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Fanconi Anemia
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%.  [from GeneReviews]
Full text of GeneReview (by section):
Summary  |  Diagnosis  |  Clinical Characteristics  |  Differential Diagnosis  |  Management  |  Genetic Counseling  |  Resources  |  Molecular Genetics  |  References  |  Chapter Notes
Blanche P Alter  |  Gary Kupfer   view full author information

Additional descriptions

Fanconi anemia of complementation group P is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increased chromosomal instability and progressive bone marrow failure. Some patients have skeletal anomalies (summary by Kim et al., 2011). For a general description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Fanconi anemia (FA), see 227650.
From GHR
Fanconi anemia is a condition that affects many parts of the body. People with this condition may have bone marrow failure, physical abnormalities, organ defects, and an increased risk of certain cancers. The major function of bone marrow is to produce new blood cells. These include red blood cells, which carry oxygen to the body's tissues; white blood cells, which fight infections; and platelets, which are necessary for normal blood clotting. Approximately 90 percent of people with Fanconi anemia have impaired bone marrow function that leads to a decrease in the production of all blood cells (aplastic anemia). Affected individuals experience extreme tiredness (fatigue) due to low numbers of red blood cells (anemia), frequent infections due to low numbers of white blood cells (neutropenia), and clotting problems due to low numbers of platelets (thrombocytopenia). People with Fanconi anemia may also develop myelodysplastic syndrome, a condition in which immature blood cells fail to develop normally. More than half of people with Fanconi anemia have physical abnormalities. These abnormalities can involve irregular skin coloring such as unusually light-colored skin (hypopigmentation) or café-au-lait spots, which are flat patches on the skin that are darker than the surrounding area. Other possible symptoms of Fanconi anemia include malformed thumbs or forearms and other skeletal problems including short stature; malformed or absent kidneys and other defects of the urinary tract; gastrointestinal abnormalities; heart defects; eye abnormalities such as small or abnormally shaped eyes; and malformed ears and hearing loss. People with this condition may have abnormal genitalia or malformations of the reproductive system. As a result, most affected males and about half of affected females cannot have biological children (are infertile). Additional signs and symptoms can include abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system), including increased fluid in the center of the brain (hydrocephalus) or an unusually small head size (microcephaly). Individuals with Fanconi anemia have an increased risk of developing a cancer of blood-forming cells in the bone marrow called acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or tumors of the head, neck, skin, gastrointestinal system, or genital tract. The likelihood of developing one of these cancers in people with Fanconi anemia is between 10 and 30 percent.

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