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Meckel syndrome type 4(MKS4)

MedGen UID:
410003
Concept ID:
C1970161
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: CEP290-Related Meckel Syndrome; MECKEL-GRUBER SYNDROME, TYPE 4; MKS4
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Sources: HPO, Orphanet
A mode of inheritance that is observed for traits related to a gene encoded on one of the autosomes (i.e., the human chromosomes 1-22) in which a trait manifests in homozygotes. In the context of medical genetics, autosomal recessive disorders manifest in homozygotes (with two copies of the mutant allele) or compound heterozygotes (whereby each copy of a gene has a distinct mutant allele).
 
Gene (location): CEP290 (12q21.32)
OMIM®: 611134

Definition

Meckel syndrome is an autosomal recessive pre- or perinatal lethal disorder characterized by a combination of renal cysts and variably associated features including developmental anomalies of the central nervous system (typically occipital encephalocele), hepatic ductal dysplasia and cysts, and postaxial polydactyly (summary by Baala et al., 2007). For a more complete phenotypic description and information on genetic heterogeneity of Meckel syndrome, see MKS1 (249000). [from OMIM]

Additional description

From GHR
Meckel syndrome is a disorder with severe signs and symptoms that affect many parts of the body. The most common features are enlarged kidneys with numerous fluid-filled cysts; an occipital encephalocele, which is a sac-like protrusion of the brain through an opening at the back of the skull; and the presence of extra fingers and toes (polydactyly). Most affected individuals also have a buildup of scar tissue (fibrosis) in the liver.Other signs and symptoms of Meckel syndrome vary widely among affected individuals. Numerous abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) have been reported in people with Meckel syndrome, including a group of birth defects known as neural tube defects. These defects occur when a structure called the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. Meckel syndrome can also cause problems with development of the eyes and other facial features, heart, bones, urinary system, and genitalia.Because of their serious health problems, most individuals with Meckel syndrome die before or shortly after birth. Most often, affected infants die of respiratory problems or kidney failure.  https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/meckel-syndrome

Clinical features

Atrial septal defect
MedGen UID:
6753
Concept ID:
C0018817
Congenital Abnormality
Atrial septal defect (ASD) is a congenital abnormality of the interatrial septum that enables blood flow between the left and right atria via the interatrial septum.
Ventricular septal defect
MedGen UID:
42366
Concept ID:
C0018818
Anatomical Abnormality
Developmental abnormalities in any portion of the VENTRICULAR SEPTUM resulting in abnormal communications between the two lower chambers of the heart. Classification of ventricular septal defects is based on location of the communication, such as perimembranous, inlet, outlet (infundibular), central muscular, marginal muscular, or apical muscular defect.
Microphthalmos
MedGen UID:
10033
Concept ID:
C0026010
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Renal cyst
MedGen UID:
7215
Concept ID:
C0022679
Disease or Syndrome
A fluid filled sac in the kidney.
Ulnar polydactyly of fingers
MedGen UID:
609221
Concept ID:
C0431904
Congenital Abnormality
Supernumerary digits located at the ulnar side of the hand (that is, on the side with the fifth finger).
Bowing of the long bones
MedGen UID:
340849
Concept ID:
C1855340
Disease or Syndrome
A bending or abnormal curvature of a long bone.
Small-for-dates baby
MedGen UID:
7066
Concept ID:
C0021296
Disease or Syndrome
An abnormal restriction of fetal growth with fetal weight below the tenth percentile for gestational age.
Anencephalus
MedGen UID:
8068
Concept ID:
C0002902
Congenital Abnormality
Anencephaly is considered an extreme form of neural tube defect (182940), which has been associated with variation in several genes. The entity described here is believed to show autosomal recessive inheritance.
Dandy-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4150
Concept ID:
C0010964
Disease or Syndrome
Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. Affected individuals often have motor deficits such as delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia; about half have mental retardation and some have hydrocephalus. DWM is a heterogeneous disorder. The low empiric recurrence risk of approximately 1 to 2% for nonsyndromic DWM suggests that mendelian inheritance is unlikely (summary by Murray et al., 1985).
Cephalocele
MedGen UID:
4934
Concept ID:
C0014065
Congenital Abnormality
Brain tissue herniation through a congenital or acquired defect in the skull. The majority of congenital encephaloceles occur in the occipital or frontal regions. Clinical features include a protuberant mass that may be pulsatile. The quantity and location of protruding neural tissue determines the type and degree of neurologic deficit. Visual defects, psychomotor developmental delay, and persistent motor deficits frequently occur.
Hydrocephalus
MedGen UID:
9335
Concept ID:
C0020255
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hydrocephalus is characterized by onset in utero of enlarged ventricles due to a disturbance of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation. Affected individuals may have neurologic impairment (summary by Drielsma et al., 2012). Hydrocephalus can also be caused by Arnold-Chiari malformation, atresia of foramen of Magendie, stenosis of aqueduct of Sylvius (307000), toxoplasmosis, hydranencephaly, etc. Furthermore, it develops in infancy or childhood in achondroplasia (100800) and in Hurler disease (607014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Congenital Hydrocephalus See also autosomal recessive HYC2 (615219), caused by mutation in the MPDZ gene (603785) on chromosome 9p. An X-linked form (307000) is caused by mutation in the L1CAM gene on (308840) on chromosome Xq28.
Microcephalus
MedGen UID:
44422
Concept ID:
C0025958
Congenital Abnormality
Occipito-frontal (head) circumference (OFC) less than -3 standard deviations compared to appropriate, age matched, normal standards (Ross JJ, Frias JL 1977, PMID:9683597). Alternatively, decreased size of the cranium.
Hypoplasia of corpus callosum
MedGen UID:
138005
Concept ID:
C0344482
Congenital Abnormality
Underdevelopment of the corpus callosum.
Familial aplasia of the vermis
MedGen UID:
98464
Concept ID:
C0431399
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS). Hypotonia. Developmental delays. Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Molar tooth sign on MRI
MedGen UID:
400670
Concept ID:
C1865060
Finding
An abnormal appearance of the midbrain in axial magnetic resonance imaging in which the elongated superior cerebellar peduncles give the midbrain an appearance reminiscent of a molar or wisdom tooth.
Bile duct proliferation
MedGen UID:
120603
Concept ID:
C0267818
Disease or Syndrome
Proliferative changes of the bile ducts.
Dandy-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4150
Concept ID:
C0010964
Disease or Syndrome
Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. Affected individuals often have motor deficits such as delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia; about half have mental retardation and some have hydrocephalus. DWM is a heterogeneous disorder. The low empiric recurrence risk of approximately 1 to 2% for nonsyndromic DWM suggests that mendelian inheritance is unlikely (summary by Murray et al., 1985).
Cephalocele
MedGen UID:
4934
Concept ID:
C0014065
Congenital Abnormality
Brain tissue herniation through a congenital or acquired defect in the skull. The majority of congenital encephaloceles occur in the occipital or frontal regions. Clinical features include a protuberant mass that may be pulsatile. The quantity and location of protruding neural tissue determines the type and degree of neurologic deficit. Visual defects, psychomotor developmental delay, and persistent motor deficits frequently occur.
Microcephalus
MedGen UID:
44422
Concept ID:
C0025958
Congenital Abnormality
Occipito-frontal (head) circumference (OFC) less than -3 standard deviations compared to appropriate, age matched, normal standards (Ross JJ, Frias JL 1977, PMID:9683597). Alternatively, decreased size of the cranium.
Ulnar polydactyly of fingers
MedGen UID:
609221
Concept ID:
C0431904
Congenital Abnormality
Supernumerary digits located at the ulnar side of the hand (that is, on the side with the fifth finger).
Bowing of the long bones
MedGen UID:
340849
Concept ID:
C1855340
Disease or Syndrome
A bending or abnormal curvature of a long bone.
Cleft palate
MedGen UID:
3107
Concept ID:
C0008925
Congenital Abnormality
Cleft palate is a developmental defect of the palate resulting from a failure of fusion of the palatine processes and manifesting as a separation of the roof of the mouth (soft and hard palate).
Dandy-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
4150
Concept ID:
C0010964
Disease or Syndrome
Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. Affected individuals often have motor deficits such as delayed motor development, hypotonia, and ataxia; about half have mental retardation and some have hydrocephalus. DWM is a heterogeneous disorder. The low empiric recurrence risk of approximately 1 to 2% for nonsyndromic DWM suggests that mendelian inheritance is unlikely (summary by Murray et al., 1985).
Cephalocele
MedGen UID:
4934
Concept ID:
C0014065
Congenital Abnormality
Brain tissue herniation through a congenital or acquired defect in the skull. The majority of congenital encephaloceles occur in the occipital or frontal regions. Clinical features include a protuberant mass that may be pulsatile. The quantity and location of protruding neural tissue determines the type and degree of neurologic deficit. Visual defects, psychomotor developmental delay, and persistent motor deficits frequently occur.
Microcephalus
MedGen UID:
44422
Concept ID:
C0025958
Congenital Abnormality
Occipito-frontal (head) circumference (OFC) less than -3 standard deviations compared to appropriate, age matched, normal standards (Ross JJ, Frias JL 1977, PMID:9683597). Alternatively, decreased size of the cranium.
Microphthalmos
MedGen UID:
10033
Concept ID:
C0026010
Congenital Abnormality
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss.People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision.People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved.Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.

Professional guidelines

PubMed

Salonen R, Kestilä M, Bergmann C
Eur J Hum Genet 2011 Jul;19(7) Epub 2011 Feb 2 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2010.255. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 21368913Free PMC Article

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Watson CM, Crinnion LA, Berry IR, Harrison SM, Lascelles C, Antanaviciute A, Charlton RS, Dobbie A, Carr IM, Bonthron DT
BMC Med Genet 2016 Jan 4;17:1. doi: 10.1186/s12881-015-0265-z. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 26729329Free PMC Article
Seidahmed MZ, Abdelbasit OB, Shaheed MM, Alhussein KA, Miqdad AM, Samadi AS, Khalil MI, Al-Mardawi E, Salih MA
Saudi Med J 2014 Dec;35 Suppl 1:S49-56. PMID: 25551112Free PMC Article
Eckmann-Scholz C, Jonat W, Zerres K, Ortiz-Brüchle N
Arch Gynecol Obstet 2012 Oct;286(4):917-21. Epub 2012 Jun 15 doi: 10.1007/s00404-012-2411-6. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22699515
Delous M, Baala L, Salomon R, Laclef C, Vierkotten J, Tory K, Golzio C, Lacoste T, Besse L, Ozilou C, Moutkine I, Hellman NE, Anselme I, Silbermann F, Vesque C, Gerhardt C, Rattenberry E, Wolf MT, Gubler MC, Martinovic J, Encha-Razavi F, Boddaert N, Gonzales M, Macher MA, Nivet H, Champion G, Berthélémé JP, Niaudet P, McDonald F, Hildebrandt F, Johnson CA, Vekemans M, Antignac C, Rüther U, Schneider-Maunoury S, Attié-Bitach T, Saunier S
Nat Genet 2007 Jul;39(7):875-81. Epub 2007 Jun 10 doi: 10.1038/ng2039. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 17558409

Diagnosis

Watson CM, Crinnion LA, Berry IR, Harrison SM, Lascelles C, Antanaviciute A, Charlton RS, Dobbie A, Carr IM, Bonthron DT
BMC Med Genet 2016 Jan 4;17:1. doi: 10.1186/s12881-015-0265-z. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 26729329Free PMC Article
Barisic I, Boban L, Loane M, Garne E, Wellesley D, Calzolari E, Dolk H, Addor MC, Bergman JE, Braz P, Draper ES, Haeusler M, Khoshnood B, Klungsoyr K, Pierini A, Queisser-Luft A, Rankin J, Rissmann A, Verellen-Dumoulin C
Eur J Hum Genet 2015 Jun;23(6):746-52. Epub 2014 Sep 3 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2014.174. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25182137Free PMC Article
Seidahmed MZ, Abdelbasit OB, Shaheed MM, Alhussein KA, Miqdad AM, Samadi AS, Khalil MI, Al-Mardawi E, Salih MA
Saudi Med J 2014 Dec;35 Suppl 1:S49-56. PMID: 25551112Free PMC Article
Eckmann-Scholz C, Jonat W, Zerres K, Ortiz-Brüchle N
Arch Gynecol Obstet 2012 Oct;286(4):917-21. Epub 2012 Jun 15 doi: 10.1007/s00404-012-2411-6. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22699515

Prognosis

Zhang D, Aravind L
Cell Cycle 2012 Oct 15;11(20):3861-75. Epub 2012 Sep 14 doi: 10.4161/cc.22068. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22983010Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Barisic I, Boban L, Loane M, Garne E, Wellesley D, Calzolari E, Dolk H, Addor MC, Bergman JE, Braz P, Draper ES, Haeusler M, Khoshnood B, Klungsoyr K, Pierini A, Queisser-Luft A, Rankin J, Rissmann A, Verellen-Dumoulin C
Eur J Hum Genet 2015 Jun;23(6):746-52. Epub 2014 Sep 3 doi: 10.1038/ejhg.2014.174. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 25182137Free PMC Article
Zhang D, Aravind L
Cell Cycle 2012 Oct 15;11(20):3861-75. Epub 2012 Sep 14 doi: 10.4161/cc.22068. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22983010Free PMC Article

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