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Results: 5

1.

Hypertensive disorder

Blood pressure is the force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries. Each time your heart beats, it pumps out blood into the arteries. Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats, pumping the blood. This is called systolic pressure. When your heart is at rest, between beats, your blood pressure falls. This is the diastolic pressure. . Your blood pressure reading uses these two numbers, the systolic and diastolic pressures. Usually they are written one above or before the other. A reading of : -119/79 or lower is normal blood pressure. -140/90 or higher is high blood pressure. -Between 120 and 139 for the top number, or between 80 and 89 for the bottom number is prehypertension. High blood pressure usually has no symptoms, but it can cause serious problems such as stroke, heart failure, heart attack and kidney failure. You can control high blood pressure through healthy lifestyle habits and taking medicines, if needed. . NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
6969
Concept ID:
C0020538
Disease or Syndrome
2.

Hypertension

A finding of increased blood pressure; not necessarily hypertensive disorder [from SNOMED CT]

MedGen UID:
635666
Concept ID:
C0497247
Finding
3.

Pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension is defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure greater than 25 mm Hg during rest (normal level, 10 mm Hg) or greater than 30 mm Hg during exercise (normal level, 15 mm Hg), as determined with right heart catheterization. [from HPO]

MedGen UID:
505097
Concept ID:
CN001893
Finding
4.

Pulmonary hypertension

Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood vessels that carry blood from your heart to your lungs become hard and narrow. Your heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and cannot do its job and you can develop heart failure. . Symptoms of PH include: -Shortness of breath during routine activity, such as climbing two flights of stairs. -Tiredness. -Chest pain. -A racing heartbeat. -Pain on the upper right side of the abdomen. -Decreased appetite. As PH worsens, you may find it hard to do any physical activities. There are two main kinds of PH. One runs in families or appears for no known reason. The other kind is related to another condition, usually heart or lung disease. . There is no cure for PH. Treatments can control symptoms. They involve treating the heart or lung disease, medicines, oxygen, and sometimes lung transplantation. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.  [from MedlinePlus]

MedGen UID:
9376
Concept ID:
C0020542
Disease or Syndrome
5.

Skin/hair/eye pigmentation, variation in, 2

Two types of melanin, the red pheomelanin and the black eumelanin, are present in human skin. Valverde et al. (1995) noted that eumelanin is photoprotective, whereas pheomelanin may contribute to UV-induced skin damage because of its potential to generate free radicals in response to ultraviolet radiation. Individuals with red hair have a predominance of pheomelanin in hair and skin and/or a reduced ability to produce eumelanin, which may explain why they fail to tan and are at risk from ultraviolet radiation. In mammals, the relative proportions of pheomelanin and eumelanin are regulated by melanocyte-stimulating hormone (see 176830), which acts via its receptor (MC1R) on melanocytes to increase the synthesis of eumelanin, and also via the product of the agouti locus (AGTI; 600201), which antagonizes this action. [from OMIM]

MedGen UID:
376587
Concept ID:
C1849452
Disease or Syndrome

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