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Abnormal thrombosis

MedGen UID:
505035
Concept ID:
CN001789
Finding
 
HPO: HP:0001977

Definition

Venous or arterial thrombosis (formation of blood clots) of spontaneous nature and which cannot be fully explained by acquired risk (e.g. atherosclerosis). [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Primary pulmonary hypertension
MedGen UID:
57749
Concept ID:
C0152171
Disease or Syndrome
Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by widespread obstruction and obliteration of the smallest pulmonary arteries. When a sufficient number of vessels are occluded, the resistance to blood flow through the lungs increases, and the right ventricle attempts to compensate by generating higher pressure to maintain pulmonary blood flow. When the right ventricle can no longer compensate for the increased resistance, progressive heart failure ensues. Initial symptoms include dyspnea (60%), fatigue (19%), syncope (8%), chest pain (7%), palpitations (5%), and leg edema (3%). All ages are affected, but the mean age at diagnosis is 36 years. Mean survival after diagnosis is 2.8 years; current therapy does improve clinical function but has modest effect on survival. The term heritable PAH (HPAH) includes familial PAH (PAH that occurs in two or more family members) and simplex PAH (i.e., a single occurrence in a family) when a pathogenic variant has been identified. Most heritable PAH (75%) is caused by a pathogenic variant in BMPR2; pathogenic variants in other genes (i.e., ACVRL1, KCNK3, CAV1, SMAD9, BMPR1B,) are considerably less common (1-3%). HPAH has identical symptoms, signs, and histology as PAH of unknown cause. The time from onset of symptoms to diagnosis may be shorter in individuals with familial PAH, possibly because of familial awareness of the disease. Three retrospective studies suggest that persons with PAH who have a BMPR2 pathogenic variant exhibit more severe disease.
Hereditary pancreatitis
MedGen UID:
116056
Concept ID:
C0238339
Disease or Syndrome
A disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of pancreatitis that start at a young age. It is caused by mutations in the PRSS1 or SPINK1 genes. Patients are at a high risk of developing pancreatic carcinoma.
May-Hegglin anomaly
MedGen UID:
87410
Concept ID:
C0340978
Finding
MYH9-related disorders (MYH9RD) are characterized by large platelets (i.e., >40% of platelets >3.9 µm in diameter) and thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 x 10(9)/L), both of which are present from birth. MYH9RD is variably associated with young-adult onset of progressive sensorineural hearing loss, presenile cataract, elevation of liver enzymes, and renal disease manifesting initially as glomerular nephropathy. Before identification of the gene in which mutation is causative, MYH9, individuals with MYH9RD were diagnosed as having Epstein syndrome, Fechtner syndrome, May-Hegglin anomaly, or Sebastian syndrome based on the combination of different clinical findings at the time of diagnosis. However, the realization that they all are due to heterozygous pathogenic variants in MYH9 and that the clinical findings often worsen throughout life as a result of late onset of non-hematologic manifestations has led the four conditions to be regarded as one disorder, now known as MYH9RD.
Arterial tortuosity syndrome
MedGen UID:
347942
Concept ID:
C1859726
Disease or Syndrome
Arterial tortuosity syndrome (ATS) is characterized by: Severe and widespread arterial tortuosity of the aorta and middle-sized arteries (with an increased risk of aneurysms and dissections) and focal and widespread stenosis which can involve the aorta and/or pulmonary arteries; ??The risk for ischemic vascular events involving cerebrovascular circulation and the abdominal arteries is increased. In addition, large veins may be dilated and valvular regurgitation and mitral valve prolapse can occur. Craniofacial involvement with characteristic facies and high palate with dental crowding; Soft/doughy skin and other evidence of a generalized connective tissue disorder including skeletal findings (scoliosis, pectus excavatum/carinatum, joint laxity, knee/elbow contractures, arachnodactyly, camptodactyly); inguinal/abdominal wall hernia; sliding hiatal or diaphragmatic hernia; hypotonia; and ocular involvement (myopia, keratoconus).
Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1B
MedGen UID:
400692
Concept ID:
C1865145
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital disorders of N-linked glycosylation (abbreviated here as CDG-N-linked), are a group of disorders of N-linked oligosaccharides caused by deficiency in 42 different enzymes in the N-linked synthetic pathway. Most commonly, the disorders begin in infancy; manifestations range from severe developmental delay and hypotonia with multiple organ system involvement to hypoglycemia and protein-losing enteropathy with normal development. However, most types have been described in only a few individuals, and thus understanding of the phenotypes is limited. In PMM2-CDG (CDG-Ia), the most common type reported, the clinical presentation and course are highly variable, ranging from death in infancy to mild involvement in adults.
Thrombophilia, histidine-rich glycoprotein-related
MedGen UID:
416465
Concept ID:
C2751090
Disease or Syndrome

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Arnold PD
Paediatr Anaesth 2014 Jan;24(1):89-97. Epub 2013 Nov 15 doi: 10.1111/pan.12296. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24237961
Ilhan F, Celiker U, Godekmerdan A, Kan E
Arch Med Res 2005 Jul-Aug;36(4):372-5. doi: 10.1016/j.arcmed.2005.03.032. PMID: 15950077

Diagnosis

Ilhan F, Celiker U, Godekmerdan A, Kan E
Arch Med Res 2005 Jul-Aug;36(4):372-5. doi: 10.1016/j.arcmed.2005.03.032. PMID: 15950077

Therapy

Arnold PD
Paediatr Anaesth 2014 Jan;24(1):89-97. Epub 2013 Nov 15 doi: 10.1111/pan.12296. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24237961

Clinical prediction guides

Cortes-Canteli M, Paul J, Norris EH, Bronstein R, Ahn HJ, Zamolodchikov D, Bhuvanendran S, Fenz KM, Strickland S
Neuron 2010 Jun 10;66(5):695-709. doi: 10.1016/j.neuron.2010.05.014. PMID: 20547128Free PMC Article
Ilhan F, Celiker U, Godekmerdan A, Kan E
Arch Med Res 2005 Jul-Aug;36(4):372-5. doi: 10.1016/j.arcmed.2005.03.032. PMID: 15950077

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