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Microphthalmos

MedGen UID:
504501
Concept ID:
CN000533
Finding
Synonyms: Microphthalmia; Nanophthalmos
 
HPO: HP:0000568

Definition

A developmental anomaly characterized by abnormal smallness of one or both eyes. [from HPO]

Conditions with this feature

Gorlin syndrome
MedGen UID:
2554
Concept ID:
C0004779
Neoplastic Process
Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is characterized by the development of multiple jaw keratocysts, frequently beginning in the second decade of life, and/or basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) usually from the third decade onward. Approximately 60% of individuals have a recognizable appearance with macrocephaly, bossing of the forehead, coarse facial features, and facial milia. Most individuals have skeletal anomalies (e.g., bifid ribs, wedge-shaped vertebrae). Ectopic calcification, particularly in the falx, is present in more than 90% of affected individuals by age 20 years. Cardiac and ovarian fibromas occur in approximately 2% and 20% of individuals respectively. Approximately 5% of children with NBCCS develop medulloblastoma (primitive neuroectodermal tumor [PNET]), generally the desmoplastic subtype. Peak incidence is at age two years. Life expectancy in NBCCS is not significantly different from average.
Focal dermal hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
42055
Concept ID:
C0016395
Disease or Syndrome
Focal dermal hypoplasia is a multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. Skin manifestations present at birth include atrophic and hypoplastic areas of skin; cutis aplasia; fat nodules in the dermis manifesting as soft, yellow-pink cutaneous nodules; and pigmentary changes. Verrucoid papillomas of the skin and mucous membranes may appear later. The nails can be ridged, dysplastic, or hypoplastic; hair can be sparse or absent. Limb malformations include oligo/syndactyly and split hand/foot. Developmental abnormalities of the eye can include anophthalmia/microphthalmia, iris and chorioretinal coloboma, and lacrimal duct abnormalities. Craniofacial findings can include facial asymmetry, notched alae nasi, cleft lip and palate, and pointed chin. Occasional findings include dental anomalies, abdominal wall defects, diaphragmatic hernia, and renal anomalies. Psychomotor development is usually normal; some individuals have cognitive impairment.
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome
MedGen UID:
5414
Concept ID:
C0018522
Congenital Abnormality
Hallermann-Streiff syndrome is characterized by a typical skull shape (brachycephaly with frontal bossing), hypotrichosis, microphthalmia, cataracts, beaked nose, micrognathia, skin atrophy, dental anomalies, and proportionate short stature (Hallermann, 1948; Streiff, 1950; Francois, 1958). Mental retardation is present in a minority of cases (Gorlin et al., 1990).
Incontinentia pigmenti syndrome
MedGen UID:
7049
Concept ID:
C0021171
Disease or Syndrome
Incontinentia pigmenti (IP) is a disorder that affects the skin, hair, teeth, nails, eyes, and central nervous system. Characteristic skin lesions evolve through four stages: I. Blistering (birth to age ~4 months). II. Wart-like rash (for several months). III. Swirling macular hyperpigmentation (age ~6 months into adulthood) . IV. Linear hypopigmentation. Alopecia, hypodontia, abnormal tooth shape, and dystrophic nails are observed. Neovascularization of the retina, present in some individuals, predisposes to retinal detachment. Neurologic findings including cognitive delays/intellectual disability and learning disability are occasionally seen.
Lowe syndrome
MedGen UID:
18145
Concept ID:
C0028860
Disease or Syndrome
Lowe syndrome (oculocerebrorenal syndrome) is characterized by involvement of the eyes, central nervous system, and kidneys. Dense congenital cataracts are found in all affected boys and infantile glaucoma in approximately 50%. All boys have impaired vision; corrected acuity is rarely better than 20/100. Generalized hypotonia is noted at birth and is of central (brain) origin. Deep tendon reflexes are usually absent. Hypotonia may slowly improve with age, but normal motor tone and strength are never achieved. Motor milestones are delayed. Almost all affected males have some degree of intellectual disability; 10%-25% function in the low-normal or borderline range, approximately 25% in the mild-to-moderate range, and 50%-65% in the severe-to-profound range of intellectual disability. Affected males have varying degrees of proximal renal tubular dysfunction of the Fanconi type, including bicarbonate wasting and renal tubular acidosis, phosphaturia with hypophosphatemia and renal rickets, aminoaciduria, low molecular-weight (LMW) proteinuria, sodium and potassium wasting, and polyuria. Fanconi syndrome is usually not clinically apparent in the first few months of life, but symptoms may appear by age six to 12 months. Glomerulosclerosis associated with chronic tubular injury usually results in slowly progressive chronic renal failure and end-stage renal disease after age ten to 20 years.
Rothmund-Thomson syndrome
MedGen UID:
10819
Concept ID:
C0032339
Disease or Syndrome
Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS) is characterized by poikiloderma; sparse hair, eyelashes, and/or eyebrows; small stature; skeletal and dental abnormalities; cataracts; and an increased risk for cancer, especially osteosarcoma. The skin is typically normal at birth; the rash of RTS develops between age three and six months as erythema, swelling, and blistering on the face and subsequently spreads to the buttocks and extremities. The rash evolves over months to years into the chronic pattern of reticulated hypo- and hyperpigmentation, punctate atrophy, and telangiectases, collectively known as poikiloderma. Hyperkeratotic lesions occur in approximately one third of individuals. Skeletal abnormalities include dysplasias, absent or malformed bones (such as absent radii), osteopenia, and delayed bone formation.
Dubowitz's syndrome
MedGen UID:
59797
Concept ID:
C0175691
Congenital Abnormality
A syndrome of intrauterine dwarfism, short stature, mental retardation, sparse hair, eczema, and characteristic facies. The phenotype varies from normal growth and head circumference with mild psychomotor retardation and lack of eczema to severe growth and mental retardation, microcephaly, behavioral problems, aplastic anemia, immunological disorders, neoplasms, and eczema Some features of this syndrome are similar to those in Bloom and fetal alcohol syndromes.
Aicardi's syndrome
MedGen UID:
61236
Concept ID:
C0175713
Disease or Syndrome
Aicardi syndrome was classically characterized by a triad of features: agenesis of the corpus callosum, distinctive chorioretinal lacunae, and infantile spasms. However, it is now well recognized that several other important findings are typically present in girls with Aicardi syndrome. Neurologic examination can reveal microcephaly, axial hypotonia, and appendicular hypertonia with spasticity. Moderate to severe global developmental delay and intellectual disability are expected. Many girls with Aicardi syndrome develop seizures prior to age three months, and most before age one year. Ongoing medically refractory epilepsy with a variety of seizure types develops over time. Costovertebral defects are common and can lead to marked scoliosis in up to one third of affected individuals. Other features include characteristic facial features, gastrointestinal difficulties, small hands, vascular malformations and pigmentary lesions of the skin, increased incidence of tumors, lower growth rate after ages seven to nine years, and precocious or delayed puberty. Survival is highly variable, with the mean age of death about 8.3 years and the median age of death about 18.5 years.
Blepharophimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus
MedGen UID:
66312
Concept ID:
C0220663
Disease or Syndrome
Blephariphimosis, ptosis, and epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) is a complex eyelid malformation invariably characterized by four major features: blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus, and telecanthus. BPES type I includes the four major features and premature ovarian insufficiency (POI); BPES type II includes only the four major features. Other ophthalmic manifestations that can be associated with BPES include lacrimal duct anomalies, amblyopia, strabismus, and refractive errors. Minor features include a broad nasal bridge, low-set ears, and a short philtrum. Individuals with BPES and an intragenic FOXL2 pathogenic variant are expected to have normal intelligence, in contrast to affected individuals with cytogenetic rearrangements that involve FOXL2 and additional genes.
Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal syndrome
MedGen UID:
66320
Concept ID:
C0220722
Congenital Abnormality
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome is an autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by microcephaly, congenital cataracts, severe mental retardation, facial dysmorphism, and arthrogryposis (summary by Jaakkola et al., 2010). Genetic Heterogeneity of Cerebrooculofacioskeletal Syndrome See also COFS2 (610756), caused by mutation in the ERCC2 gene (126340); COFS3, also known as XPG/CS syndrome (see 278780), caused by mutation in the ERCC5 gene (133530); and COFS4 (610758), caused by mutation in the ERCC1 gene (126380).
Fryns syndrome
MedGen UID:
65088
Concept ID:
C0220730
Disease or Syndrome
Fryns syndrome is characterized by diaphragmatic defects (diaphragmatic hernia, eventration, hypoplasia or agenesis); characteristic facial appearance (coarse facies, ocular hypertelorism, broad and flat nasal bridge, thick nasal tip, long philtrum, low-set and poorly formed ears, tented upper lip, macrostomia, micrognathia); distal digital hypoplasia (nails, terminal phalanges); pulmonary hypoplasia; and associated anomalies (polyhydramnios, cloudy corneas and/or microphthalmia, orofacial clefting, renal dysplasia/renal cortical cysts, and/or malformations involving the brain, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitalia). Survival beyond the neonatal period has been rare. Data on postnatal growth and psychomotor development are limited; however, severe developmental delay and intellectual disability are common.
Oromandibular-limb hypogenesis spectrum
MedGen UID:
66357
Concept ID:
C0221060
Congenital Abnormality
The most basic description of Moebius syndrome is a congenital facial palsy with impairment of ocular abduction. The facial nerve (cranial nerve VII) and abducens nerve (CN VI) are most frequently involved, but other cranial nerves may be involved as well. Other variable features include orofacial dysmorphism and limb malformations. Mental retardation has been reported in a subset of patients. Most cases of Moebius syndrome are sporadic, but familial occurrence has been reported (Verzijl et al., 2003). The definition of and diagnostic criteria for Moebius syndrome have been controversial and problematic. The syndrome has most frequently been confused with hereditary congenital facial paresis (see 601471), which is restricted to involvement of the facial nerve and no other abnormalities. Verzijl et al. (2003) and Verzijl et al. (2005) concluded that HCFP and Moebius syndrome are distinct disorders, and that Moebius syndrome is a complex developmental disorder of the brainstem. Moebius syndrome was defined at the Moebius Syndrome Foundation Research Conference in 2007 as congenital, nonprogressive facial weakness with limited abduction of one or both eyes. Additional features can include hearing loss and other cranial nerve dysfunction, as well as motor, orofacial, musculoskeletal, neurodevelopmental, and social problems (summary by Webb et al., 2012). Kumar (1990) provided a review of Moebius syndrome, which was critiqued by Lipson et al. (1990). Briegel (2006) provided a review of Moebius sequence with special emphasis on neuropsychiatric findings.
Meckel-Gruber syndrome
MedGen UID:
120513
Concept ID:
C0265215
Congenital Abnormality
A rare, lethal, autosomal recessive inherited syndrome characterized by pulmonary hypoplasia, central nervous system malformations, and hepatic malformations.
Neu-Laxova syndrome
MedGen UID:
78537
Concept ID:
C0265218
Congenital Abnormality
Pallister-Hall syndrome
MedGen UID:
120514
Concept ID:
C0265220
Disease or Syndrome
Pallister-Hall syndrome (referred to as PHS in this entry) is characterized by a spectrum of anomalies ranging from polydactyly, asymptomatic bifid epiglottis, and hypothalamic hamartoma at the mild end to laryngotracheal cleft with neonatal lethality at the severe end. Individuals with mild PHS may be incorrectly diagnosed as having isolated postaxial polydactyly type A. Individuals with PHS can have pituitary insufficiency and may die as neonates from undiagnosed and untreated adrenal insufficiency.
Walker-Warburg congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
75553
Concept ID:
C0265221
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative mutations occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutations in POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SEPN1-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype.
Goldenhar syndrome
MedGen UID:
75554
Concept ID:
C0265240
Congenital Abnormality
Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Characteristic findings include facial asymmetry resulting from maxillary and/or mandibular hypoplasia; preauricular or facial tags; ear malformations that can include microtia (hypoplasia of the external ear), anotia (absence of the external ear), or aural atresia (absence of the external ear canal); and hearing loss. Severity can range from subtle facial asymmetry with a small skin tag in front of an otherwise normal-appearing ear to bilateral involvement (typically asymmetric), microtia/anotia with atresia of the ear canals, microphthalmia, and respiratory compromise from severe mandibular hypoplasia. Other craniofacial malformations including cleft lip and/or palate can be seen. Non-craniofacial malformations, especially vertebral, renal, cardiac, and limb, can be seen.
Adams-Oliver syndrome
MedGen UID:
78544
Concept ID:
C0265268
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS) is a rare developmental disorder defined by the combination of aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp vertex and terminal transverse limb defects (e.g., amputations, syndactyly, brachydactyly, or oligodactyly). In addition, vascular anomalies such as cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, pulmonary hypertension, portal hypertension, and retinal hypervascularization are recurrently seen. Congenital heart defects have been estimated to be present in 20% of AOS patients; reported malformations include ventricular septal defects, anomalies of the great arteries and their valves, and tetralogy of Fallot (summary by Stittrich et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Adams-Oliver Syndrome Other autosomal dominant forms of Adams-Oliver syndrome include AOS3 (614814), caused by mutation in the RBPJ gene (147183) on chromosome 4p15, and AOS5 (616028), caused by mutation in the NOTCH1 gene (190198) on chromosome 9q34. Autosomal recessive forms of Adams-Oliver syndrome include AOS2 (614219), caused by mutation in the DOCK6 gene (614194) on chromosome 19p13.2, and AOS4 (615297), caused by mutation in the EOGT gene (614789) on chromosome 3p14.
Kenny-Caffey syndrome
MedGen UID:
75560
Concept ID:
C0265291
Disease or Syndrome
In the classical form, the syndrome involves the skeletal and endocrine system and is manifested by inner cortical thickening with stenosis of the medullary cavities of the tubular bones, short stature, episodes of hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism, and macrocephaly. The phenotype was expanded in later cases to include central nervous system and immunological disorders and psychomotor retardation.
CHARGE association
MedGen UID:
75567
Concept ID:
C0265354
Congenital Abnormality
CHARGE is a mnemonic for coloboma, heart defects, choanal atresia, retarded growth and development, genital abnormalities, and ear anomalies. CHARGE syndrome is characterized by the following: Unilateral or bilateral coloboma of the iris, retina-choroid, and/or disc with or without microphthalmos (80%-90% of individuals). Unilateral or bilateral choanal atresia or stenosis (50%-60%). Cranial nerve dysfunction resulting in hyposmia or anosmia, unilateral or bilateral facial palsy (40%), impaired hearing, and/or swallowing problems (70%-90%). Abnormal outer ears, ossicular malformations, Mondini defect of the cochlea and absent or hypoplastic semicircular canals (>90%). Cryptorchidism in males and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism in both males and females. Developmental delay. Cardiovascular malformations (75%-85%). Growth deficiency (70%-80%). Orofacial clefts (15%-20%). Tracheoesophageal fistula (15%-20%) . Neonates with CHARGE syndrome often have multiple life-threatening medical conditions. Feeding difficulties are a major cause of morbidity in all age groups.
Cat eye syndrome
MedGen UID:
120543
Concept ID:
C0265493
Disease or Syndrome
Cat eye syndrome (CES) is characterized clinically by the combination of coloboma of the iris and anal atresia with fistula, downslanting palpebral fissures, preauricular tags and/or pits, frequent occurrence of heart and renal malformations, and normal or near-normal mental development. A small supernumerary chromosome (smaller than chromosome 21) is present, frequently has 2 centromeres, is bisatellited, and represents an inv dup(22)(q11).
Atrophia bulborum hereditaria
MedGen UID:
75615
Concept ID:
C0266526
Congenital Abnormality
NDP-related retinopathies are characterized by a spectrum of fibrous and vascular changes of the retina at birth that progress through childhood or adolescence to cause varying degrees of visual impairment. The most severe phenotype is described as Norrie disease (ND), characterized by greyish yellow fibrovascular masses (pseudogliomas) secondary to retinal vascular dysgenesis and detachment. Congenital blindness is almost always present. Approximately 30%-50% of males with ND have developmental delay/intellectual disability, behavioral abnormalities, or psychotic-like features. The majority of males with ND develop sensorineural hearing loss. Less severe phenotypes include: persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), characterized by a fibrotic white stalk from the optic disk to the lens; X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR), characterized by peripheral retinal vascular anomalies with or without fibrotic changes and retinal detachment; retinopathy of prematurity (ROP); and Coats disease, an exudative proliferative vasculopathy. Phenotypes can vary within families.
Chondrodysplasia punctata 2 X-linked dominant
MedGen UID:
79381
Concept ID:
C0282102
Disease or Syndrome
The findings in X-linked chondrodysplasia punctata 2 (CDPX2) range from fetal demise with multiple malformations and severe growth retardation to much milder manifestations, including adults with no recognizable physical abnormalities. At least 95% of liveborn individuals with CDPX2 are female with the following findings: Growth deficiency/short stature. Distinctive craniofacial appearance . Skeletal changes: stippling (chondrodysplasia punctate) on x-rays of the epiphyses of the long bones and vertebrae, the trachea and distal ends of the ribs seen in children prior to completion of normal epiphyseal ossification; rhizomelic (i.e., proximal) shortening of limbs that is often asymmetric; scoliosis. Ectodermal changes: linear or blotchy scaling ichthyosis in the newborn that usually resolves in the first months of life leaving linear or whorled atrophic patches involving hair follicles (follicular atrophoderma); coarse hair with scarring alopecia; occasional flattened or split nails; normal teeth. Ocular changes: cataracts; microphthalmia and/or microcornea. Intellect is usually normal. Rarely affected males have been identified with a phenotype that includes: hypotonia; moderate to profound developmental delay; seizures; cerebellar (primarily vermis) hypoplasia and/or Dandy-Walker variant; and agenesis of the corpus callosum.
Gorlin-Chaudhry-Moss syndrome
MedGen UID:
87500
Concept ID:
C0345382
Disease or Syndrome
Branchiooculofacial syndrome
MedGen UID:
91261
Concept ID:
C0376524
Congenital Abnormality
The branchiooculofacial syndrome (BOFS) is characterized by: branchial (cervical [90%] or infra- or supra-auricular [60%]) skin defects that range from barely perceptible thin skin or hair patch to erythematous “hemangiomatous” lesions to large weeping erosions; ocular anomalies that can include microphthalmia, anophthalmia, coloboma, and nasolacrimal duct stenosis/atresia; and facial anomalies that can include ocular hypertelorism or telecanthus, broad nasal tip, upslanted palpebral fissures, cleft lip or prominent philtral pillars that give the appearance of a repaired cleft lip (formerly called "pseudocleft lip") with or without cleft palate, upper lip pits and lower facial weakness (asymmetric crying face or partial 7(th) cranial nerve weakness). Malformed and prominent pinnae and hearing loss from inner ear and/or petrous bone anomalies are common. Intellect is usually normal.
Roberts-SC phocomelia syndrome
MedGen UID:
95931
Concept ID:
C0392475
Congenital Abnormality
Roberts syndrome (RBS) is characterized by prenatal growth retardation (ranging from mild to severe), craniofacial findings (including microcephaly and cleft lip and/or palate) and limb malformations (including bilateral symmetric tetraphocomelia or hypomelia caused by mesomelic shortening). Upper limbs are more severely affected than lower limbs. Other limb malformations include oligodactyly with thumb aplasia or hypoplasia, syndactyly, clinodactyly, and elbow and knee flexion contractures. Craniofacial abnormalities include cleft lip and/or cleft palate, premaxillary prominence, micrognathia, microbrachycephaly, malar flattening, downslanted palpebral fissures, widely spaced eyes, exophthalmos resulting from shallow orbits, corneal clouding, underdeveloped ala nasi, beaked nose, and ear malformations. Intellectual disability is reported in the majority of affected individuals. Mortality is high among severely affected pregnancies and newborns. Mildly affected individuals may survive to adulthood.
Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis
MedGen UID:
140807
Concept ID:
C0406612
Congenital Abnormality
Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a neurocutaneous disorder characterized by ocular anomalies, skin lesions, and central nervous system anomalies (Moog et al., 2007).
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy
MedGen UID:
140820
Concept ID:
C0410174
Disease or Syndrome
Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy (FCMD) is characterized by hypotonia, symmetric generalized muscle weakness, and CNS migration disturbances that result in changes consistent with cobblestone (previously type II) lissencephaly with cerebral and cerebellar cortical dysplasia. Mild, typical, and severe phenotypes are recognized. Onset typically occurs in early infancy, with a poor suck, weak cry, and floppiness. Affected individuals have contractures of the hips, knees, and interphalangeal joints. Later features include myopathic facial appearance, pseudohypertrophy of the calves and forearms, motor and speech retardation, intellectual disability, seizures, ophthalmologic abnormalities including visual impairment and retinal dysplasia, and progressive cardiac involvement in individuals older than age ten years. Swallowing disturbance occurs in individuals with severe FCMD and in individuals older than age ten years, leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia and death.
Osteoporosis with pseudoglioma
MedGen UID:
98480
Concept ID:
C0432252
Disease or Syndrome
Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome is a rare condition characterized by severe thinning of the bones (osteoporosis) and eye abnormalities that lead to vision loss. In people with this condition, osteoporosis is usually recognized in early childhood. It is caused by a shortage of minerals, such as calcium, in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone to fracture. Affected individuals often have multiple bone fractures, including in the bones that form the spine (vertebrae). Multiple fractures can cause collapse of the affected vertebrae (compressed vertebrae), abnormal side-to-side curvature of the spine (scoliosis), short stature, and limb deformities. Decreased bone mineral density can also cause softening or thinning of the skull (craniotabes). Most affected individuals have impaired vision at birth or by early infancy and are blind by young adulthood. Vision problems are usually caused by one of several eye conditions, grouped together as pseudoglioma, that affect the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye (the retina), although other eye conditions have been identified in affected individuals. Pseudogliomas are so named because, on examination, the conditions resemble an eye tumor known as a retinal glioma. Rarely, people with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome have additional signs or symptoms such as mild intellectual disability, weak muscle tone (hypotonia), abnormally flexible joints, or seizures.
Muscle eye brain disease
MedGen UID:
105341
Concept ID:
C0457133
Congenital Abnormality
Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative mutations occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutations in POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SEPN1-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype.
Anophthalmos with limb anomalies
MedGen UID:
154638
Concept ID:
C0599973
Congenital Abnormality
Ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome is a condition that results in malformations of the eyes, hands, and feet. The features of this condition are present from birth. The eyes are often absent or severely underdeveloped (anophthalmia), or they may be abnormally small (microphthalmia). Usually both eyes are similarly affected in this condition, but if only one eye is small or missing, the other eye may have a defect such as a gap or split in its structures (coloboma). The most common hand and foot malformation seen in ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome is missing fingers or toes (oligodactyly). Other frequent malformations include fingers or toes that are fused together (syndactyly) or extra fingers or toes (polydactyly). These skeletal malformations are often described as acromelic, meaning that they occur in the bones that are away from the center of the body. Additional skeletal abnormalities involving the long bones of the arms and legs or the spinal bones (vertebrae) can also occur. Affected individuals may have distinctive facial features, an opening in the lip (cleft lip) with or without an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate), or intellectual disability.
Cockayne syndrome, type B
MedGen UID:
155487
Concept ID:
C0751038
Disease or Syndrome
Cockayne syndrome (referred to as CS in this GeneReview) spans a phenotypic spectrum that includes: CS type I, the "classic" or “moderate” form; CS type II, a more severe form with symptoms present at birth; this form overlaps with cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome (COFS) or Pena-Shokeir syndrome type II; CS type III, a milder form; Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS). CS type I (moderate CS) is characterized by normal prenatal growth with the onset of growth and developmental abnormalities in the first two years. By the time the disease has become fully manifest, height, weight, and head circumference are far below the fifth percentile. Progressive impairment of vision, hearing, and central and peripheral nervous system function leads to severe disability; death typically occurs in the first or second decade. CS type II (severe CS or early-onset CS) is characterized by growth failure at birth, with little or no postnatal neurologic development. Congenital cataracts or other structural anomalies of the eye may be present. Affected children have early postnatal contractures of the spine (kyphosis, scoliosis) and joints. Death usually occurs by age seven years. CS type III (mild CS or late-onset CS) is characterized by essentially normal growth and cognitive development or by late onset. Xeroderma pigmentosum-Cockayne syndrome (XP-CS) includes facial freckling and early skin cancers typical of XP and some features typical of CS, including intellectual disability, spasticity, short stature, and hypogonadism. XP-CS does not include skeletal involvement, the facial phenotype of CS, or CNS dysmyelination and calcifications.
11q partial monosomy syndrome
MedGen UID:
162878
Concept ID:
C0795841
Disease or Syndrome
Jacobsen syndrome is a condition caused by a loss of genetic material from chromosome 11. Because this deletion occurs at the end (terminus) of the long (q) arm of chromosome 11, Jacobsen syndrome is also known as 11q terminal deletion disorder. The signs and symptoms of Jacobsen syndrome vary considerably. Most affected individuals have delayed development, including the development of motor skills (such as sitting, standing, and walking) and speech. Most also have cognitive impairment and learning difficulties. Behavioral problems have been reported, including compulsive behavior (such as shredding paper), a short attention span, and easy distractibility. Many people with Jacobsen syndrome have been diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Jacobsen syndrome is also characterized by distinctive facial features. These include small and low-set ears, widely set eyes (hypertelorism) with droopy eyelids (ptosis), skin folds covering the inner corner of the eyes (epicanthal folds), a broad nasal bridge, downturned corners of the mouth, a thin upper lip, and a small lower jaw. Affected individuals often have a large head size (macrocephaly) and a skull abnormality called trigonocephaly, which gives the forehead a pointed appearance. More than 90 percent of people with Jacobsen syndrome have a bleeding disorder called Paris-Trousseau syndrome. This condition causes a lifelong risk of abnormal bleeding and easy bruising. Paris-Trousseau syndrome is a disorder of platelets, which are blood cell fragments that are necessary for blood clotting. Other features of Jacobsen syndrome can include heart defects, feeding difficulties in infancy, short stature, frequent ear and sinus infections, and skeletal abnormalities. The disorder can also affect the digestive system, kidneys, and genitalia. The life expectancy of people with Jacobsen syndrome is unknown, although affected individuals have lived into adulthood.
Craniofacial malformations, asymmetric, with polysyndactyly and abnormal skin and gut development
MedGen UID:
167083
Concept ID:
C0795915
Disease or Syndrome
A syndrome of unilateral coronal synostosis, plagiocephaly, craniofacial asymmetry, unilateral microphthalmia, iris coloboma, broad thumbs, syndactyly of the hands, polydactyly of the feet, erosive skin lesions, gastrointestinal abnormalities, and moderate developmental delay.
Subaortic stenosis short stature syndrome
MedGen UID:
167085
Concept ID:
C0795947
Disease or Syndrome
Mental and somatic retardation with Peters anomaly (defect of the Descemet membrane and deep stromal layers of the cornea), corneal clouding, hypoplastic facies, subvalvular aortic stenosis, and skeletal abnormalities.
Microcephaly, hiatal hernia and nephrotic syndrome
MedGen UID:
167086
Concept ID:
C0795949
Disease or Syndrome
Galloway-Mowat syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microcephaly and central nervous system abnormalities resulting in severe intellectual disability. Most patients also develop seizures and nephrotic syndrome later in childhood. Many affected children die in the first decade of life (summary by Colin et al., 2014).
Kapur Toriello syndrome
MedGen UID:
208654
Concept ID:
C0796005
Disease or Syndrome
Retarded mental and growth development with variable congenial defects, including heart abnormalities, intestinal malrotation, characteristic facies, and other anomalies.
Lenz microphthalmia syndrome
MedGen UID:
162898
Concept ID:
C0796016
Congenital Abnormality
Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and/or clinical anophthalmia with malformations of the ears, teeth, fingers, skeleton, and/or genitourinary system. Microphthalmia is often accompanied by microcornea and glaucoma. Coloboma is present in approximately 60% of microphthalmic eyes with severity ranging from isolated iris coloboma to coloboma of the ciliary body, choroid, and optic disk. Ears may be low set, anteverted, posteriorly rotated, simple, cup shaped, or abnormally modeled. Hearing loss has been observed. Dental findings include irregularly shaped, missing, or widely spaced teeth. Duplicated thumbs, syndactyly, clinodactyly, camptodactyly, and microcephaly are common, as are narrow/sloping shoulders, underdeveloped clavicles, kyphoscoliosis, exaggerated lumbar lordosis, long cylindric thorax, and webbed neck. Genitourinary anomalies include hypospadias, cryptorchidism, renal hypoplasia/aplasia, and hydroureter. Approximately 60% of affected males have mild-to-severe intellectual disability or developmental delay.
Marden-Walker syndrome
MedGen UID:
163206
Concept ID:
C0796033
Disease or Syndrome
A constellation of immobile facies, blepharophimosis, micrognathia, microcephaly, midfacial hypoplasia, multiple contractures, hypotonia, arachnodactyly, developmental delay, and other anomalies.
Microphthalmia, syndromic, 7
MedGen UID:
163210
Concept ID:
C0796070
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia with linear skin defects (MLS) syndrome is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microophthalmia and/or anophthalmia and linear skin defects, usually involving the face and neck, which are present at birth and heal with age, leaving minimal residual scarring. Other findings can include central nervous system involvement (e.g., structural anomalies, infantile seizures), developmental delay, heart defects (e.g., hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, oncocytic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias), short stature, diaphragmatic hernia, nail dystrophy, preauricular pits and hearing loss, and genitourinary malformations. Inter- and intrafamilial variability is considerable.
Myhre syndrome
MedGen UID:
167103
Concept ID:
C0796081
Disease or Syndrome
Myhre syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, including microcephaly, midface hypoplasia, prognathism, and blepharophimosis, as well as typical skeletal anomalies, including short stature, square body shape, broad ribs, iliac hypoplasia, brachydactyly, flattened vertebrae, and thickened calvaria. Other features, such as congenital heart disease, may also occur. All reported cases have been sporadic (summary by Bachmann-Gagescu et al., 2011).
Nance-Horan syndrome
MedGen UID:
208665
Concept ID:
C0796085
Disease or Syndrome
Nance-Horan syndrome is an X-linked disorder characterized by congenital cataracts, dental anomalies, dysmorphic features, and, in some cases, mental retardation (summary by Burdon et al., 2003).
Oculocerebrocutaneous syndrome
MedGen UID:
163214
Concept ID:
C0796092
Disease or Syndrome
Orbital cysts and other eye defects, multiple cerebral anomalies, and focal dermal defects are the principal characteristics of this syndrome.
Renpenning syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
208670
Concept ID:
C0796135
Disease or Syndrome
Renpenning syndrome is an X-linked mental retardation syndrome with clinically recognizable features. Affected individuals have microcephaly, short stature, small testes, and dysmorphic facies, including tall narrow face, upslanting palpebral fissures, abnormal nasal configuration, cupped ears, and short philtrum. The nose may appear long or bulbous, with overhanging columella. Less consistent manifestations include ocular colobomas, cardiac malformations, cleft palate, and anal anomalies. Stevenson et al. (2005) proposed that the various X-linked mental retardation syndromes due to PQBP1 mutations be combined under the name of Renpenning syndrome.
Oculodentodigital dysplasia
MedGen UID:
167236
Concept ID:
C0812437
Disease or Syndrome
Oculodentodigital syndrome is characterized by a typical facial appearance and variable involvement of the eyes, dentition, and fingers. Characteristic facial features include a narrow, pinched nose with hypoplastic alae nasi, prominent columella and thin anteverted nares together with a narrow nasal bridge, and prominent epicanthic folds giving the impression of hypertelorism. The teeth are usually small and carious. Typical eye findings include microphthalmia and microcornea. The characteristic digital malformation is complete syndactyly of the fourth and fifth fingers (syndactyly type III) but the third finger may be involved and associated camptodactyly is a common finding (summary by Judisch et al., 1979). Neurologic abnormalities are sometimes associated (Gutmann et al., 1991), and lymphedema has been reported in some patients with ODDD (Brice et al., 2013). See review by De Bock et al. (2013). Genetic Heterogeneity of Oculodentodigital Syndrome An autosomal recessive form of ODDD (257850) is also caused by mutation in the GJA1 gene, but the majority of cases are autosomal dominant.
Duane-radial ray syndrome
MedGen UID:
301647
Concept ID:
C1623209
Disease or Syndrome
SALL4-related disorders include Duane-radial ray syndrome (DRRS, Okihiro syndrome), acro-renal-ocular syndrome (AROS), and SALL4-related Holt-Oram syndrome (HOS), three phenotypes previously thought to be distinct entities: DRRS is characterized by uni- or bilateral Duane anomaly and radial ray malformation that can include thenar hypoplasia and/or hypoplasia or aplasia of the thumbs, hypoplasia or aplasia of the radii, shortening and radial deviation of the forearms, triphalangeal thumbs, and duplication of the thumb (preaxial polydactyly). AROS is characterized by radial ray malformations, renal abnormalities (mild malrotation, ectopia, horseshoe kidney, renal hypoplasia, vesico-ureteral reflux, bladder diverticula), ocular coloboma, and Duane anomaly. Rarely, pathogenic variants in SALL4 may cause clinically typical HOS (i.e., radial ray malformations and cardiac malformations without additional features).
Microphthalmia syndromic 8
MedGen UID:
330469
Concept ID:
C1832440
Disease or Syndrome
Anophthalmia plus syndrome
MedGen UID:
322166
Concept ID:
C1833339
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly 2
MedGen UID:
322517
Concept ID:
C1834877
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a structural anomaly of the brain in which there is failed or incomplete separation of the forebrain early in gestation. Classic HPE encompasses a continuum of brain malformations including (in order of decreasing severity): alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV) type HPE; a septopreoptic type has also been described. Other CNS abnormalities not specific to HPE may also occur. HPE is accompanied by a spectrum of characteristic craniofacial anomalies in approximately 80% of individuals with HPE. Developmental delay is present in virtually all individuals with the HPE spectrum of CNS anomalies. Seizures and pituitary dysfunction are common. Most affected fetuses do not survive; severely affected children typically do not survive beyond early infancy, while a significant proportion of more mildly affected children survive past 12 months. Mildly manifesting individuals without appreciable brain anomalies on conventional neuroimaging may be described as having “microform” HPE.
Microphthalmia, isolated, with corectopia
MedGen UID:
320474
Concept ID:
C1834918
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Cataract, congenital, with microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
320475
Concept ID:
C1834919
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Holoprosencephaly 9
MedGen UID:
324369
Concept ID:
C1835819
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a structural anomaly of the brain in which there is failed or incomplete separation of the forebrain early in gestation. Classic HPE encompasses a continuum of brain malformations including (in order of decreasing severity): alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV) type HPE; a septopreoptic type has also been described. Other CNS abnormalities not specific to HPE may also occur. HPE is accompanied by a spectrum of characteristic craniofacial anomalies in approximately 80% of individuals with HPE. Developmental delay is present in virtually all individuals with the HPE spectrum of CNS anomalies. Seizures and pituitary dysfunction are common. Most affected fetuses do not survive; severely affected children typically do not survive beyond early infancy, while a significant proportion of more mildly affected children survive past 12 months. Mildly manifesting individuals without appreciable brain anomalies on conventional neuroimaging may be described as having “microform” HPE.
Nanophthalmos 2
MedGen UID:
372177
Concept ID:
C1836006
Disease or Syndrome
Foveal hypoplasia and anterior segment dysgenesis
MedGen UID:
324554
Concept ID:
C1836603
Disease or Syndrome
Foveal hypoplasia is defined as the lack of foveal depression with continuity of all neurosensory retinal layers in the presumed foveal area. Foveal hypoplasia as an isolated entity is a rare phenomenon; it is usually described in association with other ocular disorders, such as aniridia (106210), microphthalmia (see 251600), albinism (see 203100), or achromatopsia (see 216900). All reported cases of foveal hypoplasia have been accompanied by decreased visual acuity and nystagmus (summary by Perez et al., 2014). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of foveal hypoplasia, see FVH1 (136520).
Fanconi anemia, complementation group J
MedGen UID:
323015
Concept ID:
C1836860
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%.
Atrioventricular septal defect with blepharophimosis and anal and radial defects
MedGen UID:
374010
Concept ID:
C1838606
Disease or Syndrome
Warburg micro syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
333142
Concept ID:
C1838625
Disease or Syndrome
Single upper central incisor
MedGen UID:
326686
Concept ID:
C1840235
Disease or Syndrome
Joubert syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
334114
Concept ID:
C1842577
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS) . Hypotonia. Developmental delays . Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Brain small vessel disease with hemorrhage
MedGen UID:
375217
Concept ID:
C1843512
Disease or Syndrome
The spectrum of COL4A1-related disorders includes: small-vessel brain disease of varying severity variably associated with porencephaly, cerebral aneurysms, eye defects (retinal arterial tortuosity, Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly, cataract) and systemic findings (kidney involvement, muscle cramps, Raynaud phenomenon, and cardiac arrhythmia). On imaging studies, small-vessel brain disease is manifest as diffuse periventricular leukoencephalopathy, lacunar infarcts, microhemorrhage, dilated perivascular spaces, and deep intracerebral hemorrhages. Clinically, small-vessel brain disease manifests as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, single or recurrent hemorrhagic stroke, ischemic stroke, and isolated migraine with aura. Porencephaly (fluid-filled cavities in the brain detected by CT or MRI) is typically manifest as infantile hemiparesis, seizures, and intellectual disability; however, on occasion it can be an incidental finding. Hereditary angiopathy with nephropathy, aneurysms, and muscle cramps (HANAC) syndrome usually associates asymptomatic small-vessel brain disease, cerebral large vessel involvement (i.e., aneurysms), and systemic findings involving the kidney, muscle, and small vessels of the eye.
Microphthalmia, Isolated, with Cataract 3
MedGen UID:
336811
Concept ID:
C1844908
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Microphthalmia syndromic 4
MedGen UID:
337127
Concept ID:
C1844948
Disease or Syndrome
Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and/or clinical anophthalmia with malformations of the ears, teeth, fingers, skeleton, and/or genitourinary system. Microphthalmia is often accompanied by microcornea and glaucoma. Coloboma is present in approximately 60% of microphthalmic eyes with severity ranging from isolated iris coloboma to coloboma of the ciliary body, choroid, and optic disk. Ears may be low set, anteverted, posteriorly rotated, simple, cup shaped, or abnormally modeled. Hearing loss has been observed. Dental findings include irregularly shaped, missing, or widely spaced teeth. Duplicated thumbs, syndactyly, clinodactyly, camptodactyly, and microcephaly are common, as are narrow/sloping shoulders, underdeveloped clavicles, kyphoscoliosis, exaggerated lumbar lordosis, long cylindric thorax, and webbed neck. Genitourinary anomalies include hypospadias, cryptorchidism, renal hypoplasia/aplasia, and hydroureter. Approximately 60% of affected males have mild-to-severe intellectual disability or developmental delay.
Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome
MedGen UID:
337547
Concept ID:
C1846265
Disease or Syndrome
Lenz microphthalmia syndrome (LMS) is characterized by unilateral or bilateral microphthalmia and/or clinical anophthalmia with malformations of the ears, teeth, fingers, skeleton, and/or genitourinary system. Microphthalmia is often accompanied by microcornea and glaucoma. Coloboma is present in approximately 60% of microphthalmic eyes with severity ranging from isolated iris coloboma to coloboma of the ciliary body, choroid, and optic disk. Ears may be low set, anteverted, posteriorly rotated, simple, cup shaped, or abnormally modeled. Hearing loss has been observed. Dental findings include irregularly shaped, missing, or widely spaced teeth. Duplicated thumbs, syndactyly, clinodactyly, camptodactyly, and microcephaly are common, as are narrow/sloping shoulders, underdeveloped clavicles, kyphoscoliosis, exaggerated lumbar lordosis, long cylindric thorax, and webbed neck. Genitourinary anomalies include hypospadias, cryptorchidism, renal hypoplasia/aplasia, and hydroureter. Approximately 60% of affected males have mild-to-severe intellectual disability or developmental delay.
Seckel syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
338264
Concept ID:
C1847572
Disease or Syndrome
Seckel syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by growth retardation, microcephaly with mental retardation, and a characteristic facial appearance (Borglum et al., 2001). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Seckel syndrome, see SCKL1 (210600).
PHACE syndrome
MedGen UID:
376231
Concept ID:
C1847874
Disease or Syndrome
PHACE is an acronym for a neurocutaneous syndrome encompassing the following features: posterior fossa brain malformations, hemangiomas of the face (large or complex), arterial anomalies, cardiac anomalies, and eye abnormalities. The association is referred to as PHACES when ventral developmental defects, such as sternal clefting or supraumbilical raphe, are present (summary by Bracken et al., 2011).
Rodrigues blindness
MedGen UID:
340297
Concept ID:
C1849332
Disease or Syndrome
Retinal degeneration with nanophthalmos, cystic macular degeneration, and angle closure glaucoma
MedGen UID:
336593
Concept ID:
C1849408
Disease or Syndrome
Pseudotrisomy 13 syndrome
MedGen UID:
340382
Concept ID:
C1849649
Disease or Syndrome
Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a structural anomaly of the brain in which there is failed or incomplete separation of the forebrain early in gestation. Classic HPE encompasses a continuum of brain malformations including (in order of decreasing severity): alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV) type HPE; a septopreoptic type has also been described. Other CNS abnormalities not specific to HPE may also occur. HPE is accompanied by a spectrum of characteristic craniofacial anomalies in approximately 80% of individuals with HPE. Developmental delay is present in virtually all individuals with the HPE spectrum of CNS anomalies. Seizures and pituitary dysfunction are common. Most affected fetuses do not survive; severely affected children typically do not survive beyond early infancy, while a significant proportion of more mildly affected children survive past 12 months. Mildly manifesting individuals without appreciable brain anomalies on conventional neuroimaging may be described as having “microform” HPE.
Popliteal pterygium syndrome lethal type
MedGen UID:
337894
Concept ID:
C1849718
Disease or Syndrome
Bartsocas-Papas syndrome (lethal popliteal pterygium syndrome) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by multiple popliteal pterygia, ankyloblepharon, filiform bands between the jaws, cleft lip and palate, and syndactyly. Early lethality is common, although survival into childhood and beyond has been reported (summary by Mitchell et al., 2012). A less severe form of popliteal pterygium syndrome (119500) is caused by mutation in the IRF6 gene (607199).
Cousin syndrome
MedGen UID:
342400
Concept ID:
C1850040
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopalatocerebral syndrome
MedGen UID:
338025
Concept ID:
C1850338
Disease or Syndrome
Oculopalatocerebral syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by low birth weight, microcephaly, persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, microphthalmia, large ears, small hands and feet, cleft palate, joint hypermobility, developmental delay, and cerebral atrophy (summary by Pellegrino et al., 2001).
Cryptophthalmos, unilateral or bilateral, isolated
MedGen UID:
342242
Concept ID:
C1852453
Disease or Syndrome
Cryptophthalmos is a condition of eyelid malformation with an underlying malformed eye. Complete, incomplete, and symblepharon varieties exist. The skin in complete cryptophthalmos extends uninterrupted from the forehead to the cheek. In the incomplete form, there is medial eyelid fusion, but coincident intact lateral structures. The symblepharon variety presents with fusion of the upper eyelid skin to the superior aspect of the globe. The complete variety is the most common form (summary by Egier et al., 2005).
Coloboma, uveal, with cleft lip and palate and mental retardation
MedGen UID:
342303
Concept ID:
C1852750
Disease or Syndrome
Renal coloboma syndrome
MedGen UID:
339002
Concept ID:
C1852759
Disease or Syndrome
Renal coloboma (papillorenal syndrome) is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by renal hypodysplasia and abnormalities of the optic nerve. Abnormal renal structure or function is noted in 92% of affected individuals; ophthalmologic abnormalities are noted in 77% of affected individuals who have pathogenic variants in PAX2. Renal abnormalities can be clinically silent in rare individuals. In most individuals, clinically significant renal insufficiency/renal failure is reported. End-stage renal disease requiring renal transplant is not uncommon. Ophthalmologic abnormalities are typically described as optic nerve coloboma or dysplasia. Iris colobomas have not been reported in any individual with a PAX2 pathogenic variant. Ophthalmologic abnormalities may significantly impair vision in some individuals, while others have subtle changes only noted after detailed ophthalmologic examination. Additional clinical findings include hearing loss, which is noted in 7% of individuals with identified pathogenic variants in PAX2.
Cerebrooculofacioskeletal syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
342799
Concept ID:
C1853102
Disease or Syndrome
Aphakia, congenital primary
MedGen UID:
339935
Concept ID:
C1853230
Disease or Syndrome
Sclerocornea, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
344000
Concept ID:
C1853235
Disease or Syndrome
In sclerocornea there is congenital, nonprogressive corneal opacification that may be peripheral, sectoral, or central in location. Visual prognosis is related to the central corneal involvement. The cornea has a flat curvature. The majority of cases are bilateral (summary by Smith and Traboulsi, 2012). Isolated sclerocornea is caused by displacement of the limbal arcades and may be associated with cornea plana; in this condition, the anterior chamber is visible and the eye is not microphthalmic. In complex sclerocornea, however, corneal opacification is associated with microphthalmia, cataract, and/or infantile glaucoma. The central cornea is usually relatively clear, but the thickness is normal or increased, never reduced (summary by Nischal, 2007).
Microphthalmia, isolated 1
MedGen UID:
381546
Concept ID:
C1855052
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia designates a heterogeneous group of ocular malformations with a more or less evident reduction in the size of the eyeball. Additional features include high hypermetropia and a short axial length. The size of the anterior chamber and the cornea may also be reduced, whereas the lens is normal or thicker than usual for age (summary by Fuchs et al., 2005). Genetic Heterogeneity of Isolated Microphthalmia MCOP2 (610093) is caused by mutation in the CHX10 gene (142993) on chromosome 14q24. MCOP3 (611038) is caused by mutation in the RAX gene (601881) on chromosome 18q21.3. MCOP4 (613094) is caused by mutation in the GDF6 gene (601147) on chromosome 8q22.1. MCOP5 (611040) is caused by mutation in the MFRP gene (606227) on chromosome 11q23. MCOP6 (613517) is caused by mutation in the PRSS56 gene (613858) on chromosome 2q37.1. MCOP7 (613704) is caused by mutation in the GDF3 gene (606522) on chromosome 12p13.1. MCOP8 (615113) is caused by mutation in the ALDH1A3 gene (600463) on chromosome 15q26.
Microphthalmia, isolated, with coloboma 4
MedGen UID:
344410
Concept ID:
C1855053
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly with chorioretinopathy, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
343252
Concept ID:
C1855056
Disease or Syndrome
Microcephaly and chorioretinopathy is an autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by delayed psychomotor development and visual impairment, often accompanied by short stature (summary by Martin et al., 2014). Genetic Heterogeneity of Microcephaly and Chorioretinopathy See also MCCRP2 (616171), caused by mutation in the PLK4 gene (605031) on chromosome 4q27, and MCCRP3 (616335), caused by mutation in the TUBGCP4 gene (609610) on chromosome 15q15. An autosomal dominant form of microcephaly with or without chorioretinopathy, lymphedema, or mental retardation is caused by heterozygous mutation in the KIF11 gene (148760) on chromosome 10q23.33. See also Mirhosseini-Holmes-Walton syndrome (autosomal recessive pigmentary retinopathy and mental retardation; 268050), which has been mapped to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1
Marles Greenberg Persaud syndrome
MedGen UID:
383680
Concept ID:
C1855425
Disease or Syndrome
Manitoba oculotrichoanal (MOTA) syndrome is characterized by an aberrant hairline (unilateral or bilateral wedge-shaped extension of the anterior hairline from the temple region to the ipsilateral eye) and anomalies of the eyes (ocular hypertelorism, anophthalmia/microphthalmia, cryptophthalmos, colobomas of the upper eyelid and corneopalpebral synechiae), nose (bifid or wide with a notched tip), abdominal wall (omphalocele or umbilical hernia), and anus (stenosis and/or anterior displacement of the anal opening). The manifestations and degree of severity vary even among affected members of the same family. Growth and psychomotor development are normal.
Macrosomia with lethal microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
340874
Concept ID:
C1855467
Disease or Syndrome
Hydrolethalus syndrome 1
MedGen UID:
343455
Concept ID:
C1856016
Disease or Syndrome
GOMBO syndrome
MedGen UID:
343515
Concept ID:
C1856274
Disease or Syndrome
Frontofacionasal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
341599
Concept ID:
C1856687
Disease or Syndrome
The features of frontofacionasal dysplasia include blepharophimosis, lower lid lagophthalmos, primary telecanthus, S-shaped palpebral fissues, facial hypoplasia, eyelid coloboma, widow's peak, cranium bifidum occultum, frontal lipoma, nasal hypoplasia, deformed nostrils, bifid nose, and cleft of lip, premaxilla, palate, and uvula (White et al., 1991). Also see frontonasal dysplasia (136760).
Faciothoracogenital syndrome
MedGen UID:
341639
Concept ID:
C1856881
Disease or Syndrome
Dextrocardia with unusual facies and microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
346559
Concept ID:
C1857298
Disease or Syndrome
Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
341740
Concept ID:
C1857299
Congenital Abnormality
Persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), also termed 'persistent fetal vasculature,' is a developmental malformation of the eye in which the primary vitreous fails to regress in utero, resulting in the presence of a retrolental fibrovascular membrane with persistence of the posterior portion of the tunica vasculosa lentis and hyaloid artery. This abnormality is usually unilateral and associated with microphthalmia, cataract, glaucoma, and congenital retinal nonattachment (see Haddad et al., 1978; Khaliq et al., 2001; Prasov et al., 2012). PHPV shares phenotypic overlap with Norrie disease (310600). Genetic Heterogeneity of Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous A dominant form of PHPV has been described (PHPVAD; 611308).
Craniotelencephalic dysplasia
MedGen UID:
347462
Concept ID:
C1857471
Disease or Syndrome
Cataract, autosomal dominant
MedGen UID:
347693
Concept ID:
C1858679
Disease or Syndrome
Mutations in the CRYAA gene have been found to cause multiple types of cataract, which have been described as nuclear, zonular central nuclear, laminar, lamellar, anterior polar, posterior polar, cortical, embryonal, anterior subcapsular, fan-shaped, and total. Cataract associated with microcornea, sometimes called the cataract-microcornea syndrome, is also caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene. Both autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive modes of inheritance have been reported. The symbol CATC1 was formerly used for the autosomal recessive form of cataract caused by mutation in the CRYAA gene.
Cataract, microphthalmia and nystagmus
MedGen UID:
349139
Concept ID:
C1859311
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Microphthalmia syndromic 3
MedGen UID:
347232
Concept ID:
C1859773
Disease or Syndrome
SOX2-related eye disorders are characterized by anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia that is usually bilateral, severe, and apparent at birth or by prenatal ultrasound examination. Other common findings include brain malformations, esophageal atresia, cryptorchidism and/or micropenis in males, and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and/or pituitary hypoplasia. Postnatal growth failure, delayed motor development, and learning disability are common.
Vitreoretinochoroidopathy dominant
MedGen UID:
348098
Concept ID:
C1860406
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC) is a disorder that affects several parts of the eyes, including the clear gel that fills the eye (the vitreous), the light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye (the retina), and the network of blood vessels within the retina (the choroid). The eye abnormalities in ADVIRC can lead to varying degrees of vision impairment, from mild reduction to complete loss, although some people with the condition have normal vision. The signs and symptoms of ADVIRC vary, even among members of the same family. Many affected individuals have microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. The area behind the cornea can also be abnormally small, which is described as a shallow anterior chamber. Individuals with ADVIRC can develop increased pressure in the eyes (glaucoma) or clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract). In addition, some people have breakdown (degeneration) of the vitreous or the choroid. A characteristic feature of ADVIRC, visible with a special eye exam, is a circular band of excess coloring (hyperpigmentation) in the retina. This feature can help physicians diagnose the disorder. Affected individuals may also have white spots on the retina.
Arhinia choanal atresia microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
355084
Concept ID:
C1863878
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome type 2
MedGen UID:
351059
Concept ID:
C1864148
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive lethal condition characterized by an occipital meningoencephalocele, enlarged kidneys with multicystic dysplasia and fibrotic changes in the portal area of the liver and with ductal proliferation, and postaxial polydactyly. For a more complete phenotypic description and information on genetic heterogeneity, see MKS1 (249000).
Microphthalmia syndromic 6
MedGen UID:
355268
Concept ID:
C1864689
Disease or Syndrome
Anophthalmia refers to complete absence of the globe in the presence of ocular adnexa (eyelids, conjunctiva, and lacrimal apparatus). Microphthalmia is defined as a globe with a total axial length (TAL) that is at least two standard deviations below the mean for age. Classification of microphthalmia is according to the anatomic appearance of the globe and severity of axial length reduction. Severe microphthalmia refers to a globe with a corneal diameter less than 4 mm and a TAL less than 10 mm at birth or less than 12 mm after age one year. Simple microphthalmia refers to an eye that is anatomically intact except for its short TAL. Complex microphthalmia refers to an eye with anterior segment dysgenesis and/or posterior segment dysgenesis. Anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M) can be unilateral or bilateral. A/M is a heterogenous condition with various etiologies. It can be isolated or can occur with other anomalies or as part of a well-defined syndrome. One-third of individuals with A/M have associated malformations. Heritable causes of A/M include chromosome abnormalities and syndromic or nonsyndromic single gene disorders.
Microphthalmia syndromic 5
MedGen UID:
350491
Concept ID:
C1864690
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia, isolated 2
MedGen UID:
351204
Concept ID:
C1864720
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Microphthalmia, isolated, with coloboma 3
MedGen UID:
400598
Concept ID:
C1864721
Disease or Syndrome
Brachydactyly, coloboma, and anterior segment dysgenesis
MedGen UID:
355321
Concept ID:
C1864901
Disease or Syndrome
Brachyphalangy, polydactyly, and tibial aplasia/hypoplasia
MedGen UID:
355340
Concept ID:
C1864965
Disease or Syndrome
Megalencephaly cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita
MedGen UID:
355421
Concept ID:
C1865285
Disease or Syndrome
Megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria syndrome (MCAP) is characterized by a spectrum of anomalies including primary megalencephaly, prenatal overgrowth, brain and body asymmetry, cutaneous vascular malformations, digital anomalies consisting of syndactyly with or without postaxial polydactyly, connective tissue dysplasia involving the skin, subcutaneous tissue, and joints, and cortical brain malformations, most distinctively polymicrogyria (summary by Mirzaa et al., 2012). This disorder is also known as the macrocephaly-capillary malformation (MCM) syndrome (Conway et al., 2007). Mirzaa et al. (2012) suggested use of the term MCAP rather than MCM to reflect the very large brain size, rather than simply large head size, that characterizes this syndrome, and the importance and high frequency of perisylvian polymicrogyria.
Gracile bone dysplasia
MedGen UID:
356331
Concept ID:
C1865639
Disease or Syndrome
Gracile bone dysplasia is a perinatally lethal condition characterized by gracile bones with thin diaphyses, premature closure of basal cranial sutures, and microphthalmia (summary by Unger et al., 2013).
Coloboma-obesity-hypogenitalism-mental retardation syndrome
MedGen UID:
400954
Concept ID:
C1866256
Disease or Syndrome
Steinfeld syndrome
MedGen UID:
401047
Concept ID:
C1866649
Disease or Syndrome
Pelvis-shoulder dysplasia
MedGen UID:
356991
Concept ID:
C1868508
Disease or Syndrome
KENNY-CAFFEY SYNDROME, TYPE 2
MedGen UID:
406287
Concept ID:
C1876180
Congenital Abnormality
Frontonasal dysplasia
MedGen UID:
406292
Concept ID:
C1876203
Congenital Abnormality
The term frontonasal dysplasia was coined by Sedano et al. (1970) to describe a constellation of findings limited to the face and head. The disorder is defined as 2 or more of the following: (1) true ocular hypertelorism; (2) broadening of the nasal root; (3) median facial cleft affecting the nose and/or upper lip and palate; (4) unilateral or bilateral clefting of the alae nasi; (5) lack of formation of the nasal tip; (6) anterior cranium bifidum occultum (see 168500); and (7) a V-shaped or widow's peak frontal hairline (Sedano and Gorlin, 1988). Most reported cases are sporadic, but a few familial cases have been reported. Twigg et al. (2009) characterized frontonasal malformation (FNM) as a 'very heterogeneous group of disorders' and summarized clinical features. Also see acromelic frontonasal dysplasia (AFND; 603671), frontofacionasal dysplasia (FFND; 229400), oculoauriculofrontonasal syndrome (OAFNS; 601452), the acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis syndromes (201180, 239710), and craniofrontonasal syndrome (304110). Genetic Heterogeneity of Frontonasal Dysplasia Frontonasal dysplasia-2 (FND2; 613451) is caused by mutation in the ALX4 gene (605420) on chromosome 11p11.2. Frontonasal dysplasia-3 (FND3; 613456) is caused by mutation in the ALX1 gene (601527) on chromosome 12q21.
Microphthalmia with hyperopia, retinal degeneration, macrophakia, and dental anomalies
MedGen UID:
368490
Concept ID:
C1968637
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia, isolated, with coloboma 5
MedGen UID:
369356
Concept ID:
C1968843
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome type 5
MedGen UID:
409740
Concept ID:
C1969052
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome is a disorder with severe signs and symptoms that affect many parts of the body. The most common features are enlarged kidneys with numerous fluid-filled cysts; an occipital encephalocele, which is a sac-like protrusion of the brain through an opening at the back of the skull; and the presence of extra fingers and toes (polydactyly). Most affected individuals also have a buildup of scar tissue (fibrosis) in the liver. Other signs and symptoms of Meckel syndrome vary widely among affected individuals. Numerous abnormalities of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system) have been reported in people with Meckel syndrome, including a group of birth defects known as neural tube defects. These defects occur when a structure called the neural tube, a layer of cells that ultimately develops into the brain and spinal cord, fails to close completely during the first few weeks of embryonic development. Meckel syndrome can also cause problems with development of the eyes and other facial features, heart, bones, urinary system, and genitalia. Because of their serious health problems, most individuals with Meckel syndrome die before or shortly after birth. Most often, affected infants die of respiratory problems or kidney failure.
Aplasia Cutis Congenita, Congenital Heart Defect, And Frontonasal Cysts
MedGen UID:
370187
Concept ID:
C1970140
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome type 4
MedGen UID:
410003
Concept ID:
C1970161
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome is an autosomal recessive pre- or perinatal lethal disorder characterized by a combination of renal cysts and variably associated features including developmental anomalies of the central nervous system (typically occipital encephalocele), hepatic ductal dysplasia and cysts, and postaxial polydactyly (summary by Baala et al., 2007). For a more complete phenotypic description and information on genetic heterogeneity of Meckel syndrome, see MKS1 (249000).
Microphthalmia, isolated 5
MedGen UID:
410021
Concept ID:
C1970236
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Microphthalmia, isolated 3
MedGen UID:
370863
Concept ID:
C1970237
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group b
MedGen UID:
373493
Concept ID:
C1970808
Disease or Syndrome
Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by: Sun sensitivity (severe sunburn with blistering, persistent erythema on minimal sun exposure in ~60% of affected individuals, and marked freckle-like pigmentation of the face before age 2 years in most affected individuals); Ocular involvement (photophobia, keratitis, atrophy of the skin of the lids); and Greatly increased risk of cutaneous neoplasms (basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma). Approximately 25% of affected individuals have neurologic manifestations (acquired microcephaly, diminished or absent deep tendon stretch reflexes, progressive sensorineural hearing loss, and progressive cognitive impairment). The most common causes of death are skin cancer, neurologic degeneration, and internal cancer. The median age at death in persons with XP with neurodegeneration (29 years) was found to be younger than that in persons with XP without neurodegeneration (37 years).
Holoprosencephaly 10
MedGen UID:
382704
Concept ID:
C2675857
Disease or Syndrome
Nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly is an abnormality of brain development that also affects the head and face. Normally, the brain divides into two halves (hemispheres) during early development. Holoprosencephaly occurs when the brain fails to divide properly into the right and left hemispheres. This condition is called nonsyndromic to distinguish it from other types of holoprosencephaly caused by genetic syndromes, chromosome abnormalities, or substances that cause birth defects (teratogens). The severity of nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly varies widely among affected individuals, even within the same family. Nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly can be grouped into four types according to the degree of brain division. From most to least severe, the types are known as alobar, semi-lobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIHV). In the most severe forms of nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly, the brain does not divide at all. These affected individuals have one central eye (cyclopia) and a tubular nasal structure (proboscis) located above the eye. Most babies with severe nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly die before birth or soon after. In the less severe forms, the brain is partially divided and the eyes are usually set close together (hypotelorism). The life expectancy of these affected individuals varies depending on the severity of symptoms. People with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly often have a small head (microcephaly), although they can develop a buildup of fluid in the brain (hydrocephalus) that causes increased head size (macrocephaly). Other features may include an opening in the roof of the mouth (cleft palate) with or without a split in the upper lip (cleft lip), one front tooth (a single maxillary central incisor) instead of two, and a flat nasal bridge. The eyeballs may be abnormally small (microphthalmia) or absent (anophthalmia). Some individuals with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly have a distinctive pattern of facial features, including a narrowing of the head at the temples, outside corners of the eyes that point upward (upslanting palpebral fissures), large ears, a short nose with upturned nostrils, and a broad and deep space between the nose and mouth (philtrum). In general, the severity of facial features is directly related to the severity of the brain abnormalities. However, individuals with mildly affected facial features can have severe brain abnormalities. Some people do not have apparent structural brain abnormalities but have some of the facial features associated with this condition. These individuals are considered to have a form of the disorder known as microform holoprosencephaly and are typically identified after the birth of a severely affected family member. Most people with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly have developmental delay and intellectual disability. Affected individuals also frequently have a malfunctioning pituitary gland, which is a gland located at the base of the brain that produces several hormones. Because pituitary dysfunction leads to the partial or complete absence of these hormones, it can cause a variety of disorders. Most commonly, people with nonsyndromic holoprosencephaly and pituitary dysfunction develop diabetes insipidus, a condition that disrupts the balance between fluid intake and urine excretion. Dysfunction in other parts of the brain can cause seizures, feeding difficulties, and problems regulating body temperature, heart rate, and breathing. The sense of smell may be diminished (hyposmia) or completely absent (anosmia) if the part of the brain that processes smells is underdeveloped or missing.
Oculoauricular syndrome
MedGen UID:
393758
Concept ID:
C2677500
Disease or Syndrome
Stevenson-Carey syndrome
MedGen UID:
383183
Concept ID:
C2677763
Disease or Syndrome
Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency
MedGen UID:
404073
Concept ID:
C2720286
Disease or Syndrome
Dihyropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency shows large phenotypic variability, ranging from no symptoms to a convulsive disorder with motor and mental retardation in homozygous patients. In addition, homozygous and heterozygous mutation carriers can develop severe toxicity after the administration of the antineoplastic drug 5-fluorouracil (5FU), which is also catabolized by the DPYD enzyme. This is an example of a pharmacogenetic disorder (Van Kuilenburg et al., 1999). Since there is no correlation between genotype and phenotype in DPD deficiency, it appears that the deficiency is a necessary, but not sufficient, prerequisite for the development of clinical abnormalities (Van Kuilenburg et al., 1999; Enns et al., 2004).
Tetraamelia, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
411798
Concept ID:
C2749279
Disease or Syndrome
Tetra-amelia syndrome is characterized by the (complete) absence of all four limbs and anomalies involving the cranium and the face (cleft lip/cleft palate, micrognathia, microtia, single naris, choanal atresia, absence of nose); eyes (microphthalmia, microcornea, cataract, coloboma, palpebral fusion); urogenital system (renal agenesis, persistence of cloaca, absence of external genitalia, atresia of vagina); anus (atresia); heart; lungs (hypoplasia/aplasia), skeleton (hypoplasia/absence of pelvic bones, absence of ribs, absence of vertebrae), and central nervous system (agenesis of olfactory nerves, agenesis of optic nerves, agenesis of corpus callosum, hydrocephalus). Affected infants are often stillborn or die shortly after birth.
Oculodentodigital dysplasia, autosomal recessive
MedGen UID:
412708
Concept ID:
C2749477
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia, isolated 4
MedGen UID:
414346
Concept ID:
C2751307
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies, type A2
MedGen UID:
461761
Concept ID:
C3150411
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. Muscle weakness typically presents from birth to early infancy. Affected infants typically appear "floppy" with low muscle tone and poor spontaneous movements. Affected children may present with delay or arrest of gross motor development together with joint and/or spinal rigidity. Muscle weakness may improve, worsen, or stabilize in the short term; however, with time progressive weakness and joint contractures, spinal deformities, and respiratory compromise may affect quality of life and life span. The main CMD subtypes, grouped by involved protein function and gene in which causative mutations occur, are laminin alpha-2 (merosin) deficiency (MDC1A), collagen VI-deficient CMD, the dystroglycanopathies (caused by mutations in POMT1, POMT2, FKTN, FKRP, LARGE, POMGNT1, and ISPD), SEPN1-related CMD (previously known as rigid spine syndrome, RSMD1) and LMNA-related CMD (L-CMD). Several less known CMD subtypes have been reported in a limited number of individuals. Cognitive impairment ranging from intellectual disability to mild cognitive delay, structural brain and/or eye abnormalities, and seizures are found almost exclusively in the dystroglycanopathies while white matter abnormalities without major cognitive involvement tend to be seen in the laminin alpha-2-deficient subtype.
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies type A5
MedGen UID:
461763
Concept ID:
C3150413
Disease or Syndrome
Congenital muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy with brain and eye anomalies (type A), which includes both the more severe Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) and the slightly less severe muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), is an autosomal recessive disorder with characteristic brain and eye malformations, profound mental retardation, congenital muscular dystrophy, and death usually in the first years of life. It represents the most severe end of a phenotypic spectrum of similar disorders resulting from defective glycosylation of DAG1 (128239), collectively known as 'dystroglycanopathies' (Beltran-Valero de Bernabe et al., 2004). For a general phenotypic description and a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of muscular dystrophy-dystroglycanopathy type A, see MDDGA1 (236670).
15q24 deletion syndrome
MedGen UID:
462024
Concept ID:
C3150674
Disease or Syndrome
The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome is characterized by global developmental delay; mild to severe (usually at least moderate) intellectual disability; facial dysmorphisms; congenital malformations of the hands and feet, eye, and genitalia; joint laxity; and growth retardation and failure to thrive. Less common findings include: seizures; conductive and sensorineural hearing loss; hypospadias and/ or micropenis. Males and females are affected equally.
Frontonasal dysplasia 3
MedGen UID:
462056
Concept ID:
C3150706
Disease or Syndrome
Frontonasal dysplasia is a condition that results from abnormal development of the head and face before birth. People with frontonasal dysplasia have at least two of the following features: widely spaced eyes (ocular hypertelorism); a broad nose; a slit (cleft) in one or both sides of the nose; no nasal tip; a central cleft involving the nose, upper lip, or roof of the mouth (palate); incomplete formation of the front of the skull with skin covering the head where bone should be (anterior cranium bifidum occultum); or a widow's peak hairline. Other features of frontonasal dysplasia can include additional facial malformations, absence or malformation of the tissue that connects the left and right halves of the brain (the corpus callosum), and intellectual disability. There are at least three types of frontonasal dysplasia that are distinguished by their genetic causes and their signs and symptoms. In addition to the features previously described, each type of frontonasal dysplasia is associated with other distinctive features. Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 1 typically have abnormalities of the nose, a long area between the nose and upper lip (philtrum), and droopy upper eyelids (ptosis). Individuals with frontonasal dysplasia type 2 can have hair loss (alopecia) and an enlarged opening in the two bones that make up much of the top and sides of the skull (enlarged parietal foramina). Males with this form of the condition often have genital abnormalities. Features of frontonasal dysplasia type 3 include eyes that are missing (anophthalmia) or very small (microphthalmia) and low-set ears that are rotated backward. Frontonasal dysplasia type 3 is typically associated with the most severe facial abnormalities, but the severity of the condition varies widely, even among individuals with the same type. Life expectancy of affected individuals depends on the severity of the malformations and whether or not surgical intervention can improve associated health problems, such as breathing and feeding problems caused by the facial clefts.
Microphthalmia, isolated 6
MedGen UID:
462107
Concept ID:
C3150757
Disease or Syndrome
Autosomal recessive isolated posterior microphthalmos defines a rare distinct phenotype restricted to the posterior segment of the eye. In adults, it is clinically characterized by extreme hyperopia (from +7.5 to +21 diopters) due to short axial length (14 mm to 20 mm; normal is greater than 21 mm). Other features include an essentially normal anterior segment, steep corneal curvatures, shallow anterior chamber, thick lenses, and thickened scleral wall. The palpebral fissures appear narrow because of relatively deep-set eyes, visual acuity is mildly to moderately reduced, and anisometropic or strabismic amblyopia is common. The fundus of the eye shows crowded optical discs, tortuous vessels, and an abnormal foveal avascular zone; in addition, papillomacular folds are often reported. Morphometric features of the small eyes predispose to complications such as narrow-angle glaucoma and uveal effusion (summary by Gal et al., 2011).
Microphthalmia, isolated 7
MedGen UID:
462319
Concept ID:
C3150969
Disease or Syndrome
Microphthalmia is an eye abnormality that arises before birth. In this condition, one or both eyeballs are abnormally small. In some affected individuals, the eyeball may appear to be completely missing; however, even in these cases some remaining eye tissue is generally present. Such severe microphthalmia should be distinguished from another condition called anophthalmia, in which no eyeball forms at all. However, the terms anophthalmia and severe microphthalmia are often used interchangeably. Microphthalmia may or may not result in significant vision loss. People with microphthalmia may also have a condition called coloboma. Colobomas are missing pieces of tissue in structures that form the eye. They may appear as notches or gaps in the colored part of the eye called the iris; the retina, which is the specialized light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye; the blood vessel layer under the retina called the choroid; or in the optic nerves, which carry information from the eyes to the brain. Colobomas may be present in one or both eyes and, depending on their size and location, can affect a person's vision. People with microphthalmia may also have other eye abnormalities, including clouding of the lens of the eye (cataract) and a narrowed opening of the eye (narrowed palpebral fissure). Additionally, affected individuals may have an abnormality called microcornea, in which the clear front covering of the eye (cornea) is small and abnormally curved. Between one-third and one-half of affected individuals have microphthalmia as part of a syndrome that affects other organs and tissues in the body. These forms of the condition are described as syndromic. When microphthalmia occurs by itself, it is described as nonsyndromic or isolated.
Fanconi anemia, complementation group D2
MedGen UID:
463627
Concept ID:
C3160738
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%.
Fanconi anemia, complementation group E
MedGen UID:
463628
Concept ID:
C3160739
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%.
Chondrodysplasia with platyspondyly, distinctive brachydactyly, hydrocephaly, and microphthalmia
MedGen UID:
477107
Concept ID:
C3275476
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481812
Concept ID:
C3280182
Disease or Syndrome
Adams-Oliver syndrome-2 is an autosomal recessive multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by aplasia cutis congenita and terminal transverse limb defects, in association with variable involvement of the brain, eyes, and cardiovascular systems (summary by Shaheen et al., 2011). For a discussion of genetic heterogeneity of Adams-Oliver syndrome, see AOS1 (100300).
Warburg micro syndrome 3
MedGen UID:
481833
Concept ID:
C3280203
Disease or Syndrome
Warburg micro syndrome 2
MedGen UID:
481844
Concept ID:
C3280214
Disease or Syndrome
Joubert syndrome 14
MedGen UID:
482396
Concept ID:
C3280766
Disease or Syndrome
Classic Joubert syndrome is characterized by three primary findings: A distinctive cerebellar and brain stem malformation called the molar tooth sign (MTS) . Hypotonia. Developmental delays . Often these findings are accompanied by episodic tachypnea or apnea and/or atypical eye movements. In general, the breathing abnormalities improve with age, truncal ataxia develops over time, and acquisition of gross motor milestones is delayed. Cognitive abilities are variable, ranging from severe intellectual disability to normal. The designation Joubert syndrome and related disorders (JSRD) is used to describe individuals with JS who have additional findings including retinal dystrophy, renal disease, ocular colobomas, occipital encephalocele, hepatic fibrosis, polydactyly, oral hamartomas, and endocrine abnormalities. Both intra- and interfamilial variation are seen.
Microphthalmia, isolated, with coloboma 7
MedGen UID:
482657
Concept ID:
C3281027
Disease or Syndrome
Chromosome 17q12 duplication syndrome
MedGen UID:
482767
Concept ID:
C3281137
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia, complementation group C
MedGen UID:
483324
Concept ID:
C3468041
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%.
Fanconi anemia, complementation group A
MedGen UID:
483333
Concept ID:
C3469521
Disease or Syndrome
Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized by physical abnormalities, bone marrow failure, and increased risk of malignancy. Physical abnormalities, present in 60%-75% of affected individuals, include one or more of the following: short stature; abnormal skin pigmentation; malformations of the thumbs, forearms, skeletal system, eyes, kidneys and urinary tract, ears (and decreased hearing), heart, gastrointestinal system, central nervous system; hypogonadism; and developmental delay. Progressive bone marrow failure with pancytopenia typically presents in the first decade, often initially with thrombocytopenia or leukopenia. By age 40 to 50 years, the estimated cumulative incidence of bone marrow failure is 90%; the incidence of hematologic malignancies (primarily acute myeloid leukemia) 10%-30%; and of nonhematologic malignancies (solid tumors, particularly of the head and neck, skin, GI tract, and genital tract) 25%-30%.
MICROPHTHALMIA, SYNDROMIC 11
MedGen UID:
765991
Concept ID:
C3553077
Disease or Syndrome
MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY-DYSTROGLYCANOPATHY (CONGENITAL WITH BRAIN AND EYE ANOMALIES), TYPE A, 7
MedGen UID:
766244
Concept ID:
C3553330
Disease or Syndrome
MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY-DYSTROGLYCANOPATHY (CONGENITAL WITH BRAIN AND EYE ANOMALIES), TYPE A, 8
MedGen UID:
766727
Concept ID:
C3553813
Disease or Syndrome
MICROPHTHALMIA, ISOLATED 8
MedGen UID:
767438
Concept ID:
C3554524
Disease or Syndrome
MICROPHTHALMIA, ISOLATED, WITH COLOBOMA 9
MedGen UID:
767506
Concept ID:
C3554592
Disease or Syndrome
MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY-DYSTROGLYCANOPATHY (CONGENITAL WITH BRAIN AND EYE ANOMALIES), TYPE A, 11
MedGen UID:
767552
Concept ID:
C3554638
Disease or Syndrome
Meckel syndrome type 1
MedGen UID:
811346
Concept ID:
C3714506
Disease or Syndrome
MICROPHTHALMIA, SYNDROMIC 13
MedGen UID:
813072
Concept ID:
C3806742
Disease or Syndrome
MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY-DYSTROGLYCANOPATHY (CONGENITAL WITH BRAIN AND EYE ANOMALIES), TYPE A, 12
MedGen UID:
815294
Concept ID:
C3808964
Disease or Syndrome
MICROPHTHALMIA, SYNDROMIC 12
MedGen UID:
816133
Concept ID:
C3809803
Disease or Syndrome
WARBURG MICRO SYNDROME 4
MedGen UID:
816595
Concept ID:
C3810265
Disease or Syndrome
JOUBERT SYNDROME 22
MedGen UID:
816608
Concept ID:
C3810278
Disease or Syndrome
Cataract, juvenile, with microcornea and glucosuria
MedGen UID:
383143
Concept ID:
C2677587
Disease or Syndrome

Recent clinical studies

Etiology

Yu S, Gao Y, Liang X, Huang Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2014 May 11;14:65. doi: 10.1186/1471-2415-14-65. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24884506Free PMC Article
Hou Z, Korn BS, Ding J, Li D
JAMA Ophthalmol 2014 Jun;132(6):753-5. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.148. PMID: 24699722
Nowilaty SR, Mousa A, Ghazi NG
Ophthalmology 2013 Aug;120(8):1656-64. Epub 2013 May 19 doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2013.01.026. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 23697957
Nowilaty SR, Khan AO, Aldahmesh MA, Tabbara KF, Al-Amri A, Alkuraya FS
Am J Ophthalmol 2013 Feb;155(2):361-372.e7. Epub 2012 Nov 3 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2012.08.016. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 23127749
Jung KI, Yang JW, Lee YC, Kim SY
Am J Ophthalmol 2012 Jun;153(6):1161-8.e1. Epub 2012 Feb 24 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2011.12.006. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22365256

Diagnosis

Yu S, Gao Y, Liang X, Huang Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2014 May 11;14:65. doi: 10.1186/1471-2415-14-65. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24884506Free PMC Article
Alkin Z, Ozkaya A, Karakucuk Y, Demirok A
Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol 2014 Apr-Jun;21(2):186-8. doi: 10.4103/0974-9233.129774. PMID: 24791113Free PMC Article
Hou Z, Korn BS, Ding J, Li D
JAMA Ophthalmol 2014 Jun;132(6):753-5. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.148. PMID: 24699722
Takkar B, Bhatia I, Chandra P, Ganguly A, Azad R
Semin Ophthalmol 2014 May;29(3):169-71. Epub 2013 Aug 15 doi: 10.3109/08820538.2013.807848. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 23947423
Nowilaty SR, Khan AO, Aldahmesh MA, Tabbara KF, Al-Amri A, Alkuraya FS
Am J Ophthalmol 2013 Feb;155(2):361-372.e7. Epub 2012 Nov 3 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2012.08.016. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 23127749

Therapy

Golan S, Kurtz S
J Glaucoma 2015 Feb;24(2):127-9. doi: 10.1097/IJG.0b013e31829da1ba. PMID: 23807357
Carifi G, Safa F, Aiello F, Baumann C, Maurino V
Br J Ophthalmol 2014 Sep;98(9):1261-5. Epub 2014 Apr 23 doi: 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2013-304579. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24759875
Kara N, Baz O, Altinkaynak H, Altan C, Demirok A
Curr Eye Res 2013 May;38(5):563-8. Epub 2013 Mar 7 doi: 10.3109/02713683.2013.774025. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 23470044
Schittkowski MP, Guthoff RF
Br J Ophthalmol 2007 Dec;91(12):1624-6. Epub 2007 Jun 13 doi: 10.1136/bjo.2007.120121. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 17567663Free PMC Article
Auffarth GU, Blum M, Faller U, Tetz MR, Völcker HE
Ophthalmology 2000 Aug;107(8):1555-60. PMID: 10919907

Prognosis

Yu S, Gao Y, Liang X, Huang Y
BMC Ophthalmol 2014 May 11;14:65. doi: 10.1186/1471-2415-14-65. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24884506Free PMC Article
Hou Z, Korn BS, Ding J, Li D
JAMA Ophthalmol 2014 Jun;132(6):753-5. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.148. PMID: 24699722
Day AC, MacLaren RE, Bunce C, Stevens JD, Foster PJ
J Cataract Refract Surg 2013 Jan;39(1):87-96. doi: 10.1016/j.jcrs.2012.08.057. PMID: 23245362
Jung KI, Yang JW, Lee YC, Kim SY
Am J Ophthalmol 2012 Jun;153(6):1161-8.e1. Epub 2012 Feb 24 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2011.12.006. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22365256
Gal A, Rau I, El Matri L, Kreienkamp HJ, Fehr S, Baklouti K, Chouchane I, Li Y, Rehbein M, Fuchs J, Fledelius HC, Vilhelmsen K, Schorderet DF, Munier FL, Ostergaard E, Thompson DA, Rosenberg T
Am J Hum Genet 2011 Mar 11;88(3):382-90. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.02.006. PMID: 21397065Free PMC Article

Clinical prediction guides

Carifi G, Safa F, Aiello F, Baumann C, Maurino V
Br J Ophthalmol 2014 Sep;98(9):1261-5. Epub 2014 Apr 23 doi: 10.1136/bjophthalmol-2013-304579. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24759875
Hou Z, Korn BS, Ding J, Li D
JAMA Ophthalmol 2014 Jun;132(6):753-5. doi: 10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2014.148. PMID: 24699722
Jung KI, Yang JW, Lee YC, Kim SY
Am J Ophthalmol 2012 Jun;153(6):1161-8.e1. Epub 2012 Feb 24 doi: 10.1016/j.ajo.2011.12.006. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22365256
Shah SP, Taylor AE, Sowden JC, Ragge N, Russell-Eggitt I, Rahi JS, Gilbert CE; Surveillance of Eye Anomalies Special Interest Group
Ophthalmology 2012 Feb;119(2):362-8. Epub 2011 Nov 4 doi: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2011.07.039. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 22054996
Gal A, Rau I, El Matri L, Kreienkamp HJ, Fehr S, Baklouti K, Chouchane I, Li Y, Rehbein M, Fuchs J, Fledelius HC, Vilhelmsen K, Schorderet DF, Munier FL, Ostergaard E, Thompson DA, Rosenberg T
Am J Hum Genet 2011 Mar 11;88(3):382-90. doi: 10.1016/j.ajhg.2011.02.006. PMID: 21397065Free PMC Article

Recent systematic reviews

Léonard A, Bernard P, Hiel AL, Hubinont C
Fetal Diagn Ther 2009;26(2):61-7. Epub 2009 Sep 11 doi: 10.1159/000238117. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 19752522
Ogata T, Wakui K, Muroya K, Ohashi H, Matsuo N, Brown DM, Ishii T, Fukushima Y
Hum Genet 1998 Jul;103(1):51-6. PMID: 9737776

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