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Cold-induced sweating syndrome 2(CISS2)

MedGen UID:
342816
Concept ID:
C1853198
Disease or Syndrome
Synonyms: CISS2; CLCF1-Related Cold-Induced Sweating Syndrome including Crisponi Syndrome
Modes of inheritance:
Autosomal recessive inheritance
MedGen UID:
141025
Concept ID:
C0441748
Intellectual Product
Autosomal recessive inheritance refers to genetic conditions that occur only when mutations are present in both copies of a given gene (i.e., the person is homozygous for a mutation, or carries two different mutations of the same gene, a state referred to as compound heterozygosity).
 
Gene: CLCF1
Cytogenetic location: 11q13.2
OMIM: 610313

Disease characteristics

Crisponi syndrome, the infantile presentation of cold-induced sweating syndrome (CISS), is characterized by dysmorphic features (distinctive facies, lower facial weakness, flexion deformity at the elbows, camptodactyly with fisted hands, misshapen feet, and overriding toes), poor suck reflex and severely impaired swallowing, temperature spikes not associated with infections, and increased risk for seizures and sudden death. During the first decade of life, children with CISS develop profuse sweating of the face, arms, and chest with ambient temperatures below 18º to 22º C and often with other stimuli including apprehension or ingestion of sweets. Affected individuals sweat very little in hot environments and may feel overheated. In the second decade, progressive thoracolumbar kyphoscoliosis requires intervention. [from GeneReviews]
Full text of GeneReview (by section):
Summary  |  Diagnosis  |  Clinical Description  |  Differential Diagnosis  |  Management  |  Genetic Counseling  |  Resources  |  Molecular Genetics  |  References  |  Chapter Notes
Authors:
Angelika F Hahn  |  Helge Boman   view full author information

Additional descriptions

From OMIM
Cold-induced sweating syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized in the neonatal period by orofacial weakness with impaired sucking and swallowing resulting in poor feeding necessitating medical intervention. Affected infants show a tendency to startle, with contractions of the facial muscles in response to tactile stimuli or during crying, trismus, abundant salivation, and opisthotonus. During the first year, most infants have spiking fevers. These features, referred to as 'Crisponi syndrome' in infancy, can result in early death without advanced care. After the first 2 years, the abnormal muscle contractions and fevers abate, and most patients show normal psychomotor development. From childhood onward, the most disabling symptoms stem from impaired thermoregulation and disabling abnormal sweating, which can be treated with clonidine. Patients have hyperhidrosis, mainly of the upper body, in response to cold temperatures, and sweat very little with heat. Other features include characteristic facial anomalies, such as round face, chubby cheeks, micrognathia, high-arched palate, low-set ears, and depressed nasal bridge, dental decay, camptodactyly, and progressive kyphoscoliosis (summary by Hahn et al., 2010). Cold-induced sweating syndrome-1 (CISS1; 272430), caused by mutation in the CRLF1 gene (604237), is a clinically indistinguishable disorder.  http://www.omim.org/entry/610313
From GHR
Cold-induced sweating syndrome is characterized by problems with regulating body temperature and other abnormalities affecting many parts of the body. In infancy, the features of this condition are often known as Crisponi syndrome. Researchers originally thought that cold-induced sweating syndrome and Crisponi syndrome were separate disorders, but it is now widely believed that they represent the same condition at different times during life. Infants with Crisponi syndrome have unusual facial features, including a flat nasal bridge, upturned nostrils, a long space between the nose and upper lip (philtrum), a high arched roof of the mouth (palate), a small chin (micrognathia), and low-set ears. The muscles in the lower part of the face are weak, leading to severe feeding difficulties, excessive drooling, and breathing problems. Other physical abnormalities associated with Crisponi syndrome include a scaly skin rash, an inability to fully extend the elbows, overlapping fingers and tightly fisted hands, and malformations of the feet and toes. Affected infants startle easily and often tense their facial muscles into a grimace-like expression. By six months of age, infants with Crisponi syndrome develop unexplained high fevers that increase the risk of seizures and sudden death. Many of the health problems associated with Crisponi syndrome improve with time, and affected individuals who survive the newborn period go on to develop other features of cold-induced sweating syndrome in early childhood. Within the first decade of life, affected individuals begin having episodes of profuse sweating (hyperhidrosis) and shivering involving the face, torso, and arms. The excessive sweating is usually triggered by exposure to temperatures below about 65 or 70 degrees Fahrenheit, but it can also be triggered by nervousness or eating sugary foods. Paradoxically, affected individuals tend not to sweat in warmer conditions, instead becoming flushed and overheated in hot environments. Adolescents with cold-induced sweating syndrome typically develop abnormal side-to-side and front-to-back curvature of the spine (scoliosis and kyphosis, often called kyphoscoliosis when they occur together). Although infants may develop life-threatening fevers, affected individuals who survive infancy have a normal life expectancy.  http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/cold-induced-sweating-syndrome

Clinical features

High palate
MedGen UID:
504397
Concept ID:
CN000211
Finding
Height of the palate more than 2 SD above the mean (objective) or palatal height at the level of the first permanent molar more than twice the height of the teeth (subjective).
Facial palsy
MedGen UID:
506391
Concept ID:
CN009454
Finding
Facial nerve palsy is a dysfunction of cranial nerve VII (the facial nerve) that results in inability to control facial muscles on the affected side with weakness of the muscles of facial expression and eye closure. This can either be present in unilateral or bilateral form.
Protruding ear
MedGen UID:
504438
Concept ID:
CN000384
Finding
Angle formed by the plane of the ear and the mastoid bone greater than the 97th centile for age (objective); or, outer edge of the helix more than 2 cm from the mastoid at the point of maximum distance (objective).
Facial palsy
MedGen UID:
506391
Concept ID:
CN009454
Finding
Facial nerve palsy is a dysfunction of cranial nerve VII (the facial nerve) that results in inability to control facial muscles on the affected side with weakness of the muscles of facial expression and eye closure. This can either be present in unilateral or bilateral form.
Abnormality of the foot
MedGen UID:
427893
Concept ID:
CN001600
Finding
An abnormality of the `skeleton of foot` (FMA:24222).
Lumbar hyperlordosis
MedGen UID:
505413
Concept ID:
CN002659
Finding
An abnormal accentuation of the inward curvature of the spine in the lumbar region.
Cubitus valgus
MedGen UID:
428322
Concept ID:
CN002685
Finding
Abnormal positioning in which the elbows are turned out.
Hyperhidrosis
MedGen UID:
5690
Concept ID:
C0020458
Finding
Excessive sweating. In the localized type, the most frequent sites are the palms, soles, axillae, inguinal folds, and the perineal area. Its chief cause is thought to be emotional. Generalized hyperhidrosis may be induced by a hot, humid environment, by fever, or by vigorous exercise.
Facial palsy
MedGen UID:
506391
Concept ID:
CN009454
Finding
Facial nerve palsy is a dysfunction of cranial nerve VII (the facial nerve) that results in inability to control facial muscles on the affected side with weakness of the muscles of facial expression and eye closure. This can either be present in unilateral or bilateral form.

Term Hierarchy

CClinical test,  RResearch test,  OOMIM,  GGeneReviews

Recent clinical studies

Diagnosis

González Fernández D, Lázaro Pérez M, Santillán Garzón S, Alvarez Martínez V, Encinas Madrazo A, Fernández Toral J, Pérez Oliva N
Dermatology 2013;227(2):126-9. Epub 2013 Aug 30 doi: 10.1159/000351880. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 24008591

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