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Progress toward global measles control and elimination, 1990-1996.

Authors

Journal

MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep. 1997 Sep 26;46(38):893-7.

Affiliation

Abstract

In 1989, the World Health Assembly resolved to reduce measles morbidity by 90% and measles mortality by 95% by 1995, compared with disease burden during the prevaccine era. By 1996, the estimated incidence and death rates for measles worldwide were reduced by 78% and 88%, respectively. In 1990, the World Summit for Children adopted a goal of vaccinating 90% of children against measles by 2000. However, routine measles vaccination coverage has remained relatively stable since 1990, and an estimated 1 million children continue to die from this preventable disease each year. During the 1990s, the widespread use of innovative measles-control strategies in the Region of the Americas and countries such as Mongolia, South Africa, and the United Kingdom demonstrated that high-level measles control and even interruption of transmission is feasible over large geographic areas. This report updates the status of measles control and elimination worldwide and includes disease surveillance and vaccination coverage data received by the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, as of August 29, 1997. These findings indicate that, in some regions, substantial progress has been made to control and interrupt measles transmission; in others, measles continues to cause high morbidity and mortality because of failure to implement measles-control strategies.

PIP:

The World Health Assembly in 1989 resolved to reduce the levels of measles morbidity and mortality by 90% and 95%, respectively, by 1995. By 1996, the estimated incidence and death rates for measles worldwide had been reduced by 78% and 88%, respectively. In 1990, the World Summit for Children adopted the goal to vaccinate 90% of children against measles by 2000, but routine measles vaccination coverage has remained relatively stable since that year. Disease surveillance and vaccination coverage data received by the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters as of August 29, 1997, indicate that in some regions, substantial progress has been made to control and interrupt measles transmission, while in others, measles continues to cause high morbidity and mortality because of failure to implement control strategies. The stages of measles control and progress toward implementing strategies are discussed. During 1980-96, the number of reported measles cases worldwide declined from 4.4 million to approximately 0.8 million. However, since measles reporting is incomplete, the actual burden from measles is estimated at 36.5 million cases and 1 million deaths. In 1996, 62% (445,949) of the measles cases worldwide were reported from the Africa Region. Of the 6 WHO regions, disease burden in 1996 was lowest in the Americas with only 2109 cases, of which 488 were reported from the US.

PMID

9315780 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
CDC - Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report: Free full text
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