GTR Home > Conditions/Phenotypes > Polycystic kidney disease, autosomal dominant

Summary

Excerpted from the GeneReview: Polycystic Kidney Disease, Autosomal Dominant
Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is generally a late-onset multisystem disorder characterized by: bilateral renal cysts; cysts in other organs including the liver, seminal vesicles, pancreas, and arachnoid membrane; vascular abnormalities including intracranial aneurysms, dilatation of the aortic root, and dissection of the thoracic aorta; mitral valve prolapse; and abdominal wall hernias. Renal manifestations include hypertension, renal pain, and renal insufficiency. Approximately 50% of individuals with ADPKD have end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by age 60 years. The prevalence of liver cysts, the most common extrarenal manifestation of ADPKD, increases with age and may have been underestimated by ultrasound studies. The prevalence of intracranial aneurysms is higher in those with a positive family history of aneurysms or subarachnoid hemorrhage (22%) than in those without such a family history (6%). Mitral valve prolapse, the most common valvular abnormality, occurs in up to 25% of affected individuals. Substantial variability in severity of renal disease and other extrarenal manifestations occurs even within the same family.

Available tests

12 tests are in the database for this condition.

Check Related conditions for additional relevant tests.

Clinical resources

Practice guidelines

  • AHA/ASA, 2014
    Guidelines for the primary prevention of stroke: a statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.
  • Spanish WG, 2014
    Spanish guidelines for the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

Consumer resources

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