Figure A. This figure depicts how the intervention, public reporting of health care quality data, may impact two populations: 1. Individuals and organizations that deliver care and 2. Patients, their representatives and organizations that purchase care. The figure shows public reporting ultimately having an impact on quality of care through actions of either population. Public reporting may result in improvements in the quality of health care (Key Question 1) harms (Key Question 2) directly or through intermediate outcomes that precede, but may ultimately contribute to improvements in the quality of health care. These intermediate outcomes include changes in structures and processes by those that deliver care (Key Question 3) and changes in patients’ or purchasers’ related behavior (Key Question 4). The figure also represents the possibility that the characteristics of the public reports may affect the impact of public reports on the quality of care and intermediate outcomes (Key Question 5). Finally the figure illustrates that contextual factors may influence the impact of public reporting on the intermediate outcomes or the quality of care (Key Question 6).

Figure AAnalytic framework

Note: Dotted lines indicate relationships between intermediate outcomes and ultimate improvement in the quality of care. KQ = Key Question; QI = quality improvement.

From: Executive Summary

Cover of Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science (Vol. 5: Public Reporting as a Quality Improvement Strategy)
Closing the Quality Gap: Revisiting the State of the Science (Vol. 5: Public Reporting as a Quality Improvement Strategy).
Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 208.5.
Totten AM, Wagner J, Tiwari A, et al.

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