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Figure 15 is a forest plot diagram depicting the relative risk of clinical outcomes after duloxetine in race subgroups. The data came from individual RCT, DESIRE (Duloxetine Efficacy and Safety for Incontinence in Racial and Ethnic Populations), that examined clinical outcomes in different race groups. The plot has two columns. The left-hand column lists race groups of the subjects taking duloxetine and clinical outcomes including improvement in UI and adverse effects. The study compared the rates of clinical outcomes in African-American vs. Caucasian and in Hispanics vs. Caucasian women. The right-hand column is a plot of relative risk of clinical outcomes after duloxetine compared to race subgroups. Each estimate is presented with 95% CI. Mean relative risk is presented by a black dot incorporating confidence intervals represented by horizontal lines. The figure demonstrates that weekly UI episodes were reduced compared to baseline in all race groups, by 65.7% in African Americans, by 73% in Hispanics, and by 75% in Caucasian women. Clinical outcomes rarely differed among racial subgroups. African American women reported improvement in UI more often than Caucasian women. Hispanic women experienced a reduction in UI by more than 50% less often than Caucasian women. Several adverse effects, including dizziness, headache, and somnolence, were less common among African American women and more common among Hispanic women than among Caucasian women.

Figure 15Clinical outcomes with duloxetine in racial subgroups of women with stress UI, DESIRE (Duloxetine Efficacy and Safety for Incontinence in Racial and Ethnic populations)388

From: Results

Cover of Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women: Diagnosis and Comparative Effectiveness
Nonsurgical Treatments for Urinary Incontinence in Adult Women: Diagnosis and Comparative Effectiveness [Internet].
Comparative Effectiveness Reviews, No. 36.
Shamliyan T, Wyman J, Kane RL.

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