Table D-3RCTs identified in the present technical brief

First Author
UI
Country
year
Study ObjectiveComparisonsSettingPopulation (N)
Mean age, yrs
Males (%)
Race
Cancer type
Type of Outcome, Followup durationOutcome, Adverse events
Photography
Del Mar CB138
7888887
Australia
1995
To evaluate excision rate of benign melanocytic neviGeneral practitioners (GPs) with a camera vs. GPs with no cameraPrimary care108 GPs (5784 pts with suspicious nevus)
28.2 years (pt level)
43.4% male (pt level)
No data on race (study conducted in Australia)
Melanoma
Intermediate outcomes
Followup = 2 years
Outcomes: Excision rates of benign melanocytic nevi

No adverse events reported
Hanrahan PF139, 140
11215011
12370325
Australia
2000;2002
To assess the utility of photographs for skin cancer managementPatient received photographs vs. patients with no photographsPrimary care973 male > 50 years agreed to participate
62.0 years
100.0% male
No data on race (study conducted in New South Wales)
Melanoma
Test accuracy
Intermediate outcomes
Followup = 2 years
Outcomes: Diagnostic accuracy between those using and not using photography
Effect of photography on management of lesion (leave lesion for followup, cryotherapy)
Cost savings of photography

No adverse events reported
English DR141
12919990
Australia
2003
To evaluate the ratio of benign to malignant excisionGPs with a camera and algorithm vs. GPs with no cameraPrimary care setting468 GPs(223 practices)
No data on age
No data on race
Melanoma
Intermediate outcomes
Followup duration
unclear
Outcome:
Ratio of benign to malignant melanoma excised.

No adverse events reported
Oliveria SA142
14751328
USA
2004
To assess the impact of nurse-delivered intervention with digital photographs to increase patient adherence to skin self examinationTeaching intervention with photo-book vs. teaching intervention alonePrimary care setting100 high-risk patients
Control age:38 years
Control male%:33.3
Dysplastic/atypical nevi
Intermediate outcomes
Followup = 4 months
Outcomes: Adherence to skin self examination.
No adverse events reported.
Chiu V28
16844506
USA
2006
To examine the accuracy of skin self examinationMole mapping vs. no mole mapping.Primary care setting88 patients
Control age:>50 yrs, 57% males in mole mapping group
Control males: 52%
Suspicious skin lesions
Intermediate outcomes
Followup = 2 weeks
Outcome:
Percentage of patients that gave accurate assessment of lesions
Bowns IR143
17049140
2006
UK
To compare tele-dermatology with face to face consultationTele-consultation vs. face to face consultation evaluating diagnostic concordance between physiciansSpecialist setting (dermatology)208 patients
46.3 years
37.4% male
No data on race
Any malignancy
Test accuracy
Process outcomes
Followup duration: NA
Outcomes: Diagnostic concordance between physicians—Sn, Sp Number of followup visits Patients' satisfaction with care
Adverse events: not reported
Dermoscopy
Carli P56
15097950
Italy
2004
To assess the impact of dermoscopy on lesion managementNaked eye and dermoscopy vs. naked eye alonePigmented lesion clinic (dermatology)913 patients
36 years
43% male
No data on race
Melanoma
Intermediate outcomes
Followup = 6 months
Outcomes:
Percentage of patients referred for surgery Number of melanoma excised
Adverse events: not reported
Argenziano G55
16622262
Barcelona, Spain, Naples, Italy
2006
To evaluate the effect of dermoscopy on the diagnostic accuracy of primary care practitionersDermoscopy evaluation vs. naked eye evaluationPrimary care setting73 PCPs
2522 patients
40.5 years
38% male
No data on race
Any malignancy
Test accuracy
Followup = 16 months
Outcomes:
Sn, Sp, NPV, PPV

Adverse events: not reported
Zalaudek I59
18427045
2008
Austria
To determine the time required to complete skin examination with or without dermoscopySkin exam and dermoscopy vs. skin exam alonePigmented lesion clinic (dermatology)1359 patients
39.5 years
45.9% male
No data on race
Any malignancy
Process outcomes
Followup duration: NA
Outcome: Median time required for complete skin examination
Adverse events: not reported
Photodynamic diagnosis
Ericson MB144
12633984
2003
Sweden
To evaluate tolerance threshold of photo-diagnosis by evaluating ratio of fluorescence intensity between ALA treated tumor tissue and normal skin4 groups with varying ALA application time, from 1 to 4 hrsdermatologist40 patients
Age: nd
No data on % male
No data on race
Basal cell carcinoma
Other outcomes
Followup duration: NA
Outcomes:
Ratio of fluorescence intensity between ALA treated tumor tissue and normal skin
Fluorescence intensity variation in ALA-treated normal skin Adverse events: not reported

ALA = 5-aminolevulinic acid, GPs = general practitioners, nd = no data, NPV = negative predictive value, PCPs = primary care physicians, PPV = positive predictive value; Sn = sensitivity; Sp =specificity.

From: Appendix D, Evidence Maps and Outcome Measures

Cover of Noninvasive Diagnostic Techniques for the Detection of Skin Cancers
Noninvasive Diagnostic Techniques for the Detection of Skin Cancers [Internet].
Comparative Effectiveness Technical Briefs, No. 11.
Parsons SK, Chan JA, Yu WWet al., authors; Sen S, editor.

NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.