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Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment

Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series, No. 35

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Rockville (MD): Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (US); .
Report No.: (SMA) 99-3354

This TIP, Enhancing Motivation for Change in Substance Abuse Treatment, embraces a fundamentally different way to conceptualize motivation. In this approach, motivation is viewed as a dynamic and changeable state rather than a static trait. This TIP shows how clinicians can influence this change process by developing a therapeutic relationship, one that respects and builds on the client's autonomy and, at the same time, makes the treatment counselor a participant in the change process. The TIP also describes different motivational interventions that can be used at all stages of change, from precontemplation and preparation to action and maintenance. The goal of this TIP is to make readers aware of the research, results, and promise of motivational interventions in the hope that they will be used more widely in clinical practice and treatment programs across the United States.

Contents

This publication is part of the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant technical assistance program. This publication was written under contract number 270-95-0013 with The CDM Group, Inc. (CDM). Sandra Clunies, MS, ICADC, served as theCSAT government project officer. Rose M Urban, LCSW, JD, CCAS, served as the CDM TIPs project director. Other CDM TIPs personnel included Raquel Ingraham, MS, project manager; Jonathan Max Gilbert, MA, managing editor; Y-Lang Nguyen, production editor; Janet G Humphrey, MA, editor/writer; Paddy Cook, freelance editor; Joanna Taylor, editor; Cara M Smith, editorial assistant; Paul A Seaman, former editorial assistant; and Kurt Olsson, former editor/writer.

The opinions expressed herein are the views of the Consensus Panel members and do not reflect the official position of CSAT, SAMHSA, or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). No official support or endorsement of CSAT, SAMHSA, or DHHS for these opinions or for particular instruments or software that may be described in this document is intended or should be inferred. The guidelines proffered in this document should not be considered as substitutes for individualized client care and treatment decisions.

Bookshelf ID: NBK64967PMID: 22514841
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