FIGURE 12.6. Importance of sniffing in shaping response patterns in the olfactory bulb and the piriform cortex.

FIGURE 12.6

Importance of sniffing in shaping response patterns in the olfactory bulb and the piriform cortex. (A): In an awake, freely moving rat, a mitral/tufted cell shows firing rate increases locked to sniffing at low frequencies, but loses temporal patterning during high-frequency sniffing. Top, spike raster; middle trace, smoothed spike rate; lower trace, local field potential (LFP) recorded from the OB, indicating sniffing behavior. (B): Dynamics of population activity patterns of neurons in the piriform cortex relative to inhalation. Neuronal response patterns become distinct from one another (i.e., show odorant-specific activity) within 200 ms after inhalation of odorant, and reach peak divergence within the first cycle. These dynamics are similar to those seen at the level of receptor input to the OB (see Figure 12.3). ([A]: From Kay, L.M. and Laurent, G., Nat Neurosci., 2, 1003–9, 1999; Rennaker, R.L. et al. J. Neurosci. 27, 1534–42, 2007. [B]: From Rennaker, R.L. et al. J. Neurosci. 27, 1534–42, 2007.)

From: Chapter 12, Active Sensing in Olfaction

Cover of The Neurobiology of Olfaction
The Neurobiology of Olfaction.
Menini A, editor.
Boca Raton (FL): CRC Press; 2010.
Copyright © 2010 by Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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