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Figure 4.6. Lymphedema arises in response to a variety of conditions that result in reduced lymph flow.

Figure 4.6

Lymphedema arises in response to a variety of conditions that result in reduced lymph flow. When lymphatic outflow (JL) is completely occluded, interstitial fluid volume initially increases because capillary filtration (JV) occurs until the interstitial Starling forces readjust to equal the Starling forces operating within the microvascular lumen. That is, because the occluded lymphatic represents the only pathway for net egress of extravasated plasma proteins from the tissue space, the decreased tissue washout of extravasated plasma proteins eventually results in dissipation of the diffusive gradient for protein flux from the blood to the tissue space and interstitial colloid osmotic pressure (πt) rises until it equals plasma oncotic pressure (πc). Likewise, continued capillary filtration in the absence of lymphatic outflow causes interstitial fluid pressure (Pt) to increase until it equals capillary pressure (Pc).

From: Chapter 4, Pathophysiology of Edema Formation

Cover of Capillary Fluid Exchange
Capillary Fluid Exchange: Regulation, Functions, and Pathology.
Scallan J, Huxley VH, Korthuis RJ.
San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2010.
Copyright © 2010 by Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences.

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