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Figure 1.3. Schematic of fluid and marker cell movement during vessel occlusion in the two cases of filtration (top panel) and reabsorption (bottom panel).

Figure 1.3

Schematic of fluid and marker cell movement during vessel occlusion in the two cases of filtration (top panel) and reabsorption (bottom panel). In the case of filtration, following occlusion of the vessel segment with a glass rod (1 to 2) the net pressure from retained colloids and the hydrostatic pressure in the perfusion pipette exceed the colloid oncotic and tissue pressures resulting in movement of fluid across the barrier. As this fluid leaves the vessel segment new fluid enters the segment from the pipette carrying with it marker red blood cells (or any other suitably sized flow marker). In the lower panel, if the gradient is reversed (more colloids inside the vessel than out, for example), fluid will move from the tissue space into the vessel carrying the marker cells away from the occluding rod, into the perfusion pipette.

From: Chapter 1, Fluid Movement Across the Endothelial Barrier

Cover of Capillary Fluid Exchange
Capillary Fluid Exchange: Regulation, Functions, and Pathology.
Scallan J, Huxley VH, Korthuis RJ.
San Rafael (CA): Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences; 2010.
Copyright © 2010 by Morgan & Claypool Life Sciences.

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