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Cover of Comparative Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Treatments for Patients With Depression

Comparative Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Treatments for Patients With Depression

A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Evidence

Evidence-based Synthesis Program

Investigators: , PhD, MPH, , MD, MHSc, , PhD, , PhD, and , MD, MHSc.

Washington (DC): Department of Veterans Affairs; .

Excerpt

Smoking is disproportionately higher among persons with depression (45% versus 22%). Furthermore, smokers with depression may experience more challenges when trying to make and maintain a quit attempt, such as greater negative mood symptoms from withdrawal, higher nicotine dependence, and greater likelihood of relapse, than smokers without depression. Despite the complex relationship between tobacco use and depression, smokers with depression are motivated to quit smoking and should be offered cessation services. Several evidence-based smoking cessation treatments are effective for the general population of smokers. Yet the comparative effectiveness of these strategies in smokers with depression is uncertain. Also, it is uncertain if factors that may facilitate targeted interventions, such as depression status, gender, and treatment sequencing (i.e., concurrent versus sequential) for mood and smoking cessation, differentially impact the effectiveness of smoking cessation interventions.

Contents

Medical Editor: Liz Wing, MA

Prepared for: Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Health Services Research & Development Service, Washington, DC 20420. Prepared by: Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) Center, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, John Williams, Jr, MD, MHSc, Director

Suggested citation:

Gierisch JM, Bastian LA, Calhoun PS, McDuffie JR, Williams JW Jr. Comparative Effectiveness of Smoking Cessation Treatments for Patients With Depression: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Evidence. VA-ESP Project #09-010; 2010

This report is based on research conducted by the Evidence-based Synthesis Program (ESP) Center located at the Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, Health Services Research and Development. The findings and conclusions in this document are those of the author(s) who are responsible for its contents; the findings and conclusions do not necessarily represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States government. Therefore, no statement in this article should be construed as an official position of the Department of Veterans Affairs. No investigators have any affiliations or financial involvement (e.g., employment, consultancies, honoraria, stock ownership or options, expert testimony, grants or patents received or pending, or royalties) that conflict with material presented in the report.

Bookshelf ID: NBK51226PMID: 21290640
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