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Catlett C, Perl T, Jenckes MW, et al. Training of Clinicians for Public Health Events Relevant to Bioterrorism Preparedness. Rockville (MD): Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US); 2002 Jan. (Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 51.)

  • This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date.

This publication is provided for historical reference only and the information may be out of date.

Cover of Training of Clinicians for Public Health Events Relevant to Bioterrorism Preparedness

Training of Clinicians for Public Health Events Relevant to Bioterrorism Preparedness.

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Appendix K. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases Bioterrorism Training Courses

MCMR-UIZ 28 SEP 01
INFORMATION PAPER  

Subject

Historical Information on The Management of Chemical and Biological Casualties In-house Course and Satellite Broadcasts.

1. In-house Course

The Medical Management of Chemical and Biological Casualties Course (MCBC) is conducted by the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Disease (USAMRIID) and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense (USAMRICD). It is held four times a year with up to 150 students in each course. This 6 ½ -day course is designed primarily for physicians, nurses, dentists, physician assistants, MSC officers with the PhD degree, and other professionals. Students spend half of the week at each institute. At USAMRIID students learn the latest information on defense against biological warfare agents, including toxins such as ricin and botulinum toxin and infectious agents including anthrax, plague, smallpox, and viral hemorrhagic fevers such as Ebola virus. At USAMRICD they learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of poisoning with chemical agents, including nerve agents like sarin, mustard, cyanides, and pulmonary intoxicants; become familiar with chemical field gear through a realistic field training exercise; and rescue poisoned animals with antidotes in a live animal laboratory exercise. Since 1992 a total of over 2800 personnel have received this training.

2. Satellite Distance Learning Course

Over the past four years, USAMRIID's Operational Medicine Division (OPMED) has annually conducted distance learning courses to train military and civilian healthcare providers to recognize and treat biological casualties. USAMRIID's 2000 satellite broadcast, "Biological Warfare and Terrorism: The Military and Public Health Response," trained more than 13,500 healthcare professionals at over 700 downlink sites, both domestic and overseas, for a total of over 56,000 personnel trained over the four years of the program. The fully accredited program, which was funded by the U.S. Army Office of the Surgeon General and co-sponsored by the CDC, featured instructors from USAMRIID, CDC, and the public health community. Attendees included medical care providers in DoD (Army, Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps), the Public Health Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Agriculture, search and rescue teams, medical centers, universities, and colleges. The program reached personnel in nine other countries (Canada, Australia, Greece, Saudi Arabia, Italy, Iceland, Guam, Japan, and Germany). This live interactive educational experience provided information needed to prevent, diagnose, and treat biological casualties in both military warfare and civilian bioterrorism scenarios at a program cost of $4.29 per continuing medical education (CME) credit hour, compared to classroom teaching methods with a cost per student of approximately $1,000.

3. Testing and Accreditation

Both the MCBC and Satellite Broadcast are accredited for the awarding of continuing education credits for physicians, nurses, and physician assistants. MCBC carries numbered course designation through the AMEDD Center & School at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Multiple-choice examinations are reviewed at the end of the course to allow students to measure knowledge learned. Examinations for the Satellite Broadcast are either completed on-line or mailed to USAMRIID for evaluation and certificates of completion are returned to the students.

4. Summary

This paper provides historical information on the in-house and satellite distance learning courses.

(Paper prepared for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, September 2001.)

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