Table 11

Results of studies on CHI applications impacting intermediate outcomes in diabetes (N=6).

Target conditionNAuthor, yearInterventionsPrimary outcomes measuredEffect of CHI applications*
Diabetes6Glasgow, 200397Tailored self-managementKristal Fat and Fiber Behavior scale
Homko, 200792TelemedicineSelf-efficacy (Diabetes Empowerment Scale (DES))+
Satisfaction and readiness to change+
McKay, 200195Internet-based physical activity interventionModerate-to-vigorous exercise0
Walking0
Richardson, 200739Computerized feedback mechanismTotal Step+
Bout Steps+
Satisfaction+
Usefulness+
Adherence (Likelihood of wearing a pedometer)+
Adherence (Mean hours of wearing a pedometer)+
Wangberg, 200693Low self-efficacy

High self-efficacy
Summary of Diabetes Self Care Activities+
Perceived competence scale
Minutes activity per day0
Wise, 198694Interactive computer assessmentKnowledge score+
Diabetes with with heart disease and chronic lung disease1Lorig, 200696Online interventionChange in health distress (0–5)+
Change in self-reported global health(0–5)0
Change in illness intrusiveness0
Change in self-efficacy0
*

(+) positive impact of the CHI application on outcome; (−) negative impact of the CHI application on outcome; (0) no impact or not a significant of the CHI application on outcome

study compares CHI targeting low self-efficacy items with CHI targeting high self-efficacy items: (+) indicates that there was an increase in self efficacy in both groups; (−) indicates a decrease in both groups

study measures the use of a personal monitoring device with tailored self –management compared with no tailored self-management

(+) positive impact of the CHI application on outcome; (−) negative impact of the CHI application on outcome; (0) no impact or not a significant of the CHI application on outcome

study compares CHI targeting low self-efficacy items with CHI targeting high self-efficacy items: (+) indicates that there was an increase in self efficacy in both groups; (−) indicates a decrease in both groups

study measures the use of a personal monitoring device with tailored self –management compared with no tailored self-management

From: 3, Results

Cover of Impact of Consumer Health Informatics Applications
Impact of Consumer Health Informatics Applications.
Evidence Reports/Technology Assessments, No. 188.
Gibbons MC, Wilson RF, Samal L, et al.

NCBI Bookshelf. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health.