Figure 7-53. The seven stripes of the protein encoded by the even-skipped (eve) gene in a developing Drosophila embryo.

Figure 7-53The seven stripes of the protein encoded by the even-skipped (eve) gene in a developing Drosophila embryo

Two and one-half hours after fertilization, the egg was fixed and stained with antibodies that recognize the Eve protein (green) and antibodies that recognize the Giant protein (red). Where Eve and Giant proteins are both present, the staining appears yellow. At this stage in development, the egg contains approximately 4000 nuclei. The Eve and Giant proteins are both located in the nuclei, and the Eve stripes are about four nuclei wide. The staining pattern of the Giant protein is also shown in Figure 7-52. (Courtesy of Michael Levine.)

From: How Genetic Switches Work

Cover of Molecular Biology of the Cell
Molecular Biology of the Cell. 4th edition.
Alberts B, Johnson A, Lewis J, et al.
New York: Garland Science; 2002.
Copyright © 2002, Bruce Alberts, Alexander Johnson, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, and Peter Walter; Copyright © 1983, 1989, 1994, Bruce Alberts, Dennis Bray, Julian Lewis, Martin Raff, Keith Roberts, and James D. Watson .

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