Cover of Guidelines on HIV and Infant Feeding 2010

Guidelines on HIV and Infant Feeding 2010

Principles and Recommendations for Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV and a Summary of Evidence
Geneva: World Health Organization; .
ISBN-13: 978-92-4-159953-5
Copyright © World Health Organization 2010.
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Overview

Significant programmatic experience and research evidence regarding HIV and infant feeding have accumulated since WHO's recommendations on infant feeding in the context of HIV were last revised in 2006. In particular, evidence has been reported that antiretroviral (ARV) interventions to either the HIV-infected mother or HIV-exposed infant can significantly reduce the risk of postnatal transmission of HIV through breastfeeding. This evidence has major implications for how women living with HIV might feed their infants, and how health workers should counsel these mothers. Together, breastfeeding and ARV intervention have the potential to significantly improve infants' chances of surviving while remaining HIV uninfected.

While the 2010 recommendations are generally consistent with the previous guidance, they recognize the important impact of ARVs during the breastfeeding period, and recommend that national authorities in each country decide which infant feeding practice, i.e. breastfeeding with an ARV intervention to reduce transmission or avoidance of all breastfeeding, should be promoted and supported by their Maternal and Child Health services. This differs from the previous recommendations in which health workers were expected to individually counsel all HIV-infected mothers about the various infant feeding options, and it was then for mothers to decide between them.

Where national authorities promote breastfeeding and ARVs, mothers known to be HIV-infected are now recommended to breastfeed their infants until at least 12 months of age. The recommendation that replacement feeding should not be used unless it is acceptable, feasible, affordable, sustainable and safe (AFASS) remains, but the acronym is replaced by more common, everyday language and terms. Recognizing that ARVs will not be rolled out everywhere immediately, guidance is given on what to do in their absence.

The designations employed and the presentation of the material in this publication do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the World Health Organization concerning the legal status of any country, territory, city or area or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers or boundaries. Dotted lines on maps represent approximate border lines for which there may not yet be full agreement.

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Copyright © World Health Organization 2010.

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Bookshelf ID: NBK180149PMID: 24501786